We can learn from Harry Potter, monk tells academics
#1
I hope Voris gets hold of this story.

"POLITICS has failed us, economics has failed us and the weather has failed us.

Now one of the country's leading monks has said we should look to Harry Potter and his magic for something better.

Academics gathered from across the world yesterday at the University of Limerick (UL) for the country's first conference exploring the cultural influence of the Potter books and films.

The keynote address of the two day event -- entitled 'Magic is Might 2012' -- was given by the abbot of Glenstal Abbey in Limerick, Mark Patrick Hederman.

Lessons

The Benedictine monk, who has a doctorate degree from UCD in the philosophy of education, said lessons from Harry Potter could benefit the country -- specifically in education.

He admitted he was "not necessarily" a big 'Harry Potter' fan, but had read all seven of JK Rowling's books.

"I am a great believer that Harry Potter is one of the most important cultural influences on all our children during the beginning of this century," he said.

"I think Joanne K Rowling is one of the most important influences on our world today.

"She is in connection with 480 million children in a way that every one of us should be envious of, especially if we are in education. She is doing more for imagination than any other single force in our thoroughly bleak and business-like century."

Asked could Ireland learn lessons from 'Harry Potter', the abbot replied "very definitely".

http://www.independent.ie/lifestyle/educ...79766.html
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#2
Having never read the books, I can't comment too intelligently on their content, but going by the movies those little wizards are better role models than almost any other secular influence I've seen on TV in the last few years. Not good enough for Catholic education (we have the saints), to my mind, but rarely objectionable.

The name of the conference troubles me, but with really no specifics on the content of his lectures, I'll give a monk the benefit of the doubt. It might be problematic given the crisis today, but I won't assume from this fluff piece. Very likely, the monk says something like, "See how Harry decides he'd rather die than abandon his friends? Let's turn to John 15:13..."
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#3
The moral relativism of Potter is particularity good for the young 'uns. Fits in nicely with Post Vat 2 "theology"
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#4
Essentially, Harry Potter is a FAIRYTALE. That's what it was meant to be, just a fun read. Though...some children don't know the difference, and it's possible a child could gain an interest in the occult from reading them. I know my first cousin did, though she grew out of it, but still, the danger is there.

Now, if the child KNEW the difference, that occult is bad and Harry Potter is just a work of fiction, then....that's another matter.

However, who am I to say that the books wouldn't help education-wise?
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#5
It's typical of the state of education, read teaching, as wrought by the Vile "Educators". It's another area where we need to wipe the slate clean and start over.

tim
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#6
One can learn from such a novel, I would say. The only danger would be that of the occult. This is why parents have to work with their kids and not give them free reign.
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#7
(07-25-2012, 01:02 PM)Crusader_Philly Wrote: One can learn from such a novel, I would say. The only danger would be that of the occult. This is why parents have to work with their kids and not give them free reign.

I agree. I never read the novels but I've seen the films, and with a little moral guidance (as with just about anything), I think good lessons can be taught.

Just make sure to be honest about the occult and how dangerous it is for people to be playing with, and to emphasize that Harry Potter is just a fairytale.
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#8
(07-25-2012, 01:09 PM)Varokhâr Wrote:
(07-25-2012, 01:02 PM)Crusader_Philly Wrote: One can learn from such a novel, I would say. The only danger would be that of the occult. This is why parents have to work with their kids and not give them free reign.

I agree. I never read the novels but I've seen the films, and with a little moral guidance (as with just about anything), I think good lessons can be taught.

Just make sure to be honest about the occult and how dangerous it is for people to be playing with, and to emphasize that Harry Potter is just a fairytale.

A fine example of cognitive dissonance going on here. On one hand Harry Potter is steeped in the occult and can lead to an unhealthy interest in this area yet on the other hand there are good lessons to be learned.   :shrug:

You only need to put a few drops of poison in the well to make all the water undrinkable.
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#9
(07-25-2012, 01:15 PM)Habitual_Ritual Wrote: A fine example of cognitive dissonance going on here. On one hand Harry Potter is steeped in the occult and can lead to an unhealthy interest in this area yet on the other hand there are good lessons to be learned.   :shrug:

You only need to put a few drops of poison in the well to make all the water undrinkable.

Modern day sports can be condemned as materialistic, atheistic, freemasonic glorifications of man, to only serve as man's bread and circus and a means to be indoctrinated via ads.

Our Faith can withstand Harry Potter, if I can withstand being surrounded by atheists, marxists, and pagans every day.
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#10
(07-25-2012, 01:20 PM)Crusader_Philly Wrote: Our Faith can withstand Harry Potter, if I can withstand being surrounded by atheists, marxists, and pagans every day.

No one is saying we can't withstand Potter but here in the OP we have a monk pointing to Potter as a moral compass and cultural marker for society. I wonder when he last spoke about the salvivic nature of Christ's life and sacrifice or the 10 commandments  as it pertains to the reality of living a good life?
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