We can learn from Harry Potter, monk tells academics
#21
Habitual_Ritual Wrote:Then your position is one of an illogical duality .

Fair enough.  It probably is illogical to believe that art can be good if it's not wholly good.  I'll definitely concede that.
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#22
(07-25-2012, 03:22 PM)ophelia Wrote:
Habitual_Ritual Wrote:Then your position is one of an illogical duality .

Fair enough.  It probably is illogical to believe that art can be good if it's not wholly good.  I'll definitely concede that.

Come on then,lets have some examples of partially good,worthy "art " that glamorizes witchcraft and moral relativism simultaneously.

Thou shalt not suffer a witch to live,” (Exodus 22:18).

Galatians 5:19-21. “Now the works of the flesh are manifest, which are these; Adultery, fornication, uncleanness, lasciviousness, idolatry, witchcraft, hatred, discord, jealousy, fits of rage, selfish ambition, dissensions, factions and envy, drunkenness, orgies, and the like.  I warn you, as I did before that those who live like this will not inherit the kingdom of God.”

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#23
Pope Leo XIII, Officiorum ac Munerum, 25 January 1897:

Quote:12.  It is forbidden to publish, read, or keep books in which sorcery, divination, magic, the evocation of spirits, and other superstitions of this kind are taught or commended.

http://www.users.qwest.net/~slrorer/Censorship.htm

Is this prohibition too old-fashioned?  Do you think it can be justly applied to Harry Potter?
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#24
(07-25-2012, 03:43 PM)SouthpawLink Wrote: Pope Leo XIII, Officiorum ac Munerum, 25 January 1897:

Quote:12.  It is forbidden to publish, read, or keep books in which sorcery, divination, magic, the evocation of spirits, and other superstitions of this kind are taught or commended.

http://www.users.qwest.net/~slrorer/Censorship.htm

Is this prohibition too old-fashioned?  Do you think it can be justly applied to Harry Potter?

for some round here it would seem so.
Not to mention the writing in Harry Potter is appalling. I'm not sure what the bigger sin is.  Grin
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#25
HR, I believe you misunderstand me; I was agreeing with you.  Your point about glamorizing witchcraft and the occult is a good one.  I am conceding that point, despite the fact that I liked the books otherwise.  I am admitting that that is irrational of me.  Peace?
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#26
(07-25-2012, 02:48 PM)Habitual_Ritual Wrote:
(07-25-2012, 02:19 PM)newyorkcatholic Wrote: Do you have any evidence to back up the suggestion that the monk in question hasn't recently spoken about Christ's life or sacrifice, or the 10 commandments?

Because if you don't have any evidence, your use of that suggestion to support criticizing him is pretty darn unfair and it would be reasonable for me to dismiss you.

Maybe this guy is a silly liberal, but maybe he's a serious Catholic who sees some value in Harry Potter ... from what you've posted, I really don't know which.

A : It is not unreasonable,given the current climate,that a cleric pointing to Harry Potter as a model of morality and sound education for today's society is bound to be cut from the liberal cloth.
Your ability to dismiss me (and therefore his pathetic pronouncement) due to potential lack of perceived  fair play in this regard makes you sound like a modernist pussy incidentally.

B: The evidence:
   

"That said, like many places, Glenstal Abbey benefited financially during the boom. “We’ve had some extremely generous donors, which allowed us to build a new library, the guest house and the new reception area.” There are plans to build three or four eco-friendly “God pods” near the abbey’s 17th-century walled garden. “That’s what is needed now: spaces where people can have as much silence and solitude as they want and yet be connected to the church.” Another plan in gestation is a farm where children can come to interact with animals and nature and then express themselves through workshops led by artists. “This will give children, especially those from feud-scarred areas of Limerick, a chance to express themselves artistically, which is the most enriching thing.” [no mention of the power of the sacraments]...

....After secondary school Hederman went to study philosophy and literature at University College Dublin, but within a year he returned to Glenstal to join the monastery, at the age of 19. When he was 21 he went to Paris to study philosophy and theology. The three years he spent there, which included the student revolution of 1968, made a lasting impression. “It was a wonderful liberation to think that every single structure of civilisation could be removed...

....In the 1990s, a year lecturing at Boston University followed by three years in Nigeria allowed him to further nurture these interests. “I was in Nigeria between 1992 and 1995, which was at a point in its history when writers who were so proficient in English were producing the most extraordinary literature and drama.” He mentions Wole Soyinka, who won the Nobel Prize in Literature for his plays based on Yoruba religious rites.

NOT WITHOUT HIS critics, Hederman has at times created controversy, both by his outspoken views on a self-serving patriarchy within the Catholic Church and, more locally, with his personal flamboyancy...

...His commissioning of the repainting of the church’s interior in vibrant colours in the late 1970s shocked many of the monks.

Similarly, when he spoke publicly about his use of tarot cards as a tool in Christian meditation, protesters came to the gates of the monastery with placards. He has no qualms about either issue.

Tarot cards were created in Europe in the 1500s, when everyone was a Christian. People have a false belief, as with other things, such as reiki, that they are evil.”

Lately he has written vociferously about psychology, spirituality and the growing links between the two...

...“We’ve all become so educated that we rely on our minds and have become so dependent on our understanding of what’s going on. Yet, psychologically, we are becoming more aware of the distance between the head and the heart. It’s heart work that is needed now, not head work, and psychology knows that it needs spirituality as the last step on its journey as it leads us to a place where religion has always been trying to approach..."

http://clericalwhispers.blogspot.com/201...-were.html


So the man is clearly a raging liberal with a penchant for the occult and pagan religions.
Like we I was going to discover otherwise!
It certainly puts the OP in a whole new light now.
No indeed NYCatholic. When you get to my level of awareness you can sniff these types coming a mile off.

I missed this stuff if any of it was in the original post.  This, I agree, is concerning.
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#27
(07-25-2012, 04:19 PM)newyorkcatholic Wrote: I missed this stuff if any of it was in the original post.  This, I agree, is concerning.

Nope,non of this stuff was mentioned in the OP but here's the thing...My Sensus Fidei is honed to such a degree now that I can sniff the underlying agenda and the liberal Cleric from under the bed at 5000 yards.I knew this guy was rotten by virtue of the headline and that there would be more to his story. A lot more it turns out.This guy has a clear esoteric, ideological agenda going on.Harry Potter,by virtue of its popularity is a useful tool for the modernists in their quest for moral and religious relativism. A relativism necessary for a New Religious Order that this guy clearly promotes in his writings.
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#28
(07-25-2012, 03:45 PM)Habitual_Ritual Wrote:
(07-25-2012, 03:43 PM)SouthpawLink Wrote: Pope Leo XIII, Officiorum ac Munerum, 25 January 1897:

Quote:12.  It is forbidden to publish, read, or keep books in which sorcery, divination, magic, the evocation of spirits, and other superstitions of this kind are taught or commended.

http://www.users.qwest.net/~slrorer/Censorship.htm

Is this prohibition too old-fashioned?  Do you think it can be justly applied to Harry Potter?

for some round here it would seem so.
Not to mention the writing in Harry Potter is appalling. I'm not sure what the bigger sin is.   Grin

Thank you for this, SPL.

I don't know. Do any of the books or movie teach or commend magic? If so, the qualifications on what teaching and commending magic are so loose that, essentially, we cannot watch any sci fi or fantasy film.

Do the Harry Potter books teach or commend sorcery like a book on malefica?
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#29
(07-25-2012, 04:33 PM)Crusader_Philly Wrote: Do any of the books or movie teach or commend magic?

Are you serious?
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#30
(07-25-2012, 04:34 PM)Habitual_Ritual Wrote:
(07-25-2012, 04:33 PM)Crusader_Philly Wrote: Do any of the books or movie teach or commend magic?

Are you serious?

It's a good question.  I know the books depict magic, but that is obviously not the same thing as teaching or commending it.  The Holy Scriptures depict all sorts of evils without teaching or commending them.
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