We can learn from Harry Potter, monk tells academics
#31
(07-25-2012, 04:36 PM)newyorkcatholic Wrote:
(07-25-2012, 04:34 PM)Habitual_Ritual Wrote:
(07-25-2012, 04:33 PM)Crusader_Philly Wrote: Do any of the books or movie teach or commend magic?

Are you serious?

It's a good question.  I know the books depict magic, but that is obviously not the same thing as teaching or commending it.  The Holy Scriptures depict all sorts of evils without teaching or commending them.

Thank you.
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#32
(07-25-2012, 04:36 PM)newyorkcatholic Wrote: It's a good question.  I know the books depict magic, but that is obviously not the same thing as teaching or commending it.  The Holy Scriptures depict all sorts of evils without teaching or commending them.

Magic is but one aspect of the books .Whats worse is the glamorization of witchcraft and wizardry.No one can deny that these are attractively portrayed throughout the stories.And the emphasis of course is on the training of child witches and wizards versus say the old sage and mystery qualities of a Gandalf  type character.
In the LOTR series the was no relativism between good and evil spells etc.That delineation was made perfectly clear.Not so in Potter.The end justifies the means
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#33
(07-25-2012, 04:49 PM)Habitual_Ritual Wrote:
(07-25-2012, 04:36 PM)newyorkcatholic Wrote: It's a good question.  I know the books depict magic, but that is obviously not the same thing as teaching or commending it.  The Holy Scriptures depict all sorts of evils without teaching or commending them.

Magic is but one aspect of the books .Whats worse is the glamorization of witchcraft and wizardry.No one can deny that these are attractively portrayed throughout the stories.

Okay, but I thought we were addressing the St Pius X document? Let's not switch up.
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#34
Do pseudo-Latin magic words and the waving of sticks filled with phoenix feathers, unicorn hair, and dragon heartstring constitute "teaching witchcraft?" Meanwhile, the less popular Bartimaeus Trilogy by Jonathan Shroud, which actually discusses summoning circles and the binding of spirits, didn't even raise an eighth of the hackles the HP books did. IMHO, the controversy over Harry Potter exists because the books are so popular that people feel like they have to weigh in with some sort of opinion, regardless of whether the series deserves hubbub. Children are fascinated by magic, just as they are fascinated with the idea of being able to fly or having super-strength. When I was younger, even Grimm's fairytales and Norse mythology led me to read up on witchcraft and fortune-telling -- that was just my inclination. Harry Potter (...or LOTR...or even the Wizard of Oz) is to witchcraft what alcohol is to alcoholism.
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