question about how to deal with a situation morally
#31
You could always take up smoking... they're only what, 18 bucks a pack in NYC?
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#32
(08-06-2012, 08:38 PM)CrusaderKing Wrote:
(08-06-2012, 10:32 AM)newyorkcatholic Wrote: To clarify, in NYC it's against the law to smoke in the common area of residences.  But she's in her apt, with her door propped open.  So she's not in a common area. The landlord could convert that apt to smoke-free, but they are not interested in that and it takes many months and old tenants are grandfathered in the old rules anyway.

I could sue, but I don't want money from her (and she would just keep her door open for the months it took to sue her, I think).

Not to make light of this, but maybe you should contact Mayor Mike (aka Super Nanny) Bloomberg's office about this. (Anyone who lives in NYC or the surrounding area knows what I'm talking about). If he doesn't take action a little bad publicity in the form of letters to the editors of the major newspapers in NYC, namely the NY Times, the NY Daily News, and the NY Post might embarrass him enough to do something.

I second the idea of calling the mayor's office, they may have similar complaints so they just may want to tighten things some more. And it looks as if they are already thinking about it: "Mayor Bloomberg is pitching a plan that would clarify where New Yorkers can smoke inside residential buildings.

The bill, which must still win approval from the City Council, would expand the city's no-smoking campaign into citizens' homes. But the mayor said that he has no intention of barring people from smoking.

"This does not prohibit anything. It just gives people the right to know before they sign a lease," said Bloomberg, who warned that potential tenants and homeowners could have reason to be concerned. "Because of air circulation in buildings, if you smoke in one apartment, other people in the building do get some of that smoke," he said.

http://www.nbcnewyork.com/news/local/Blo...97775.html

C.
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#33
(08-06-2012, 09:42 PM)newyorkcatholic Wrote: Not sure what the problem is wih signatures.

In principle, nothing, but you're not looking to have a law repealed or a referendum on something.

The whole idea of going for signatures sounds extremely formalistic and confrontational. If you show up at her door with a paper full of signatures, it's probably not going to do you any good, and it will just make it look to her like you're trying to get others on "your side" against her. It's another way of making the situation more confrontational than before.

If you take a petition to the landlord, he's going to look at it in a similar vein -- you're turning a small matter (a lady being rude and inconsiderate in leaving her door open) into grounds for a building-wide petition.

If instead you got the same people to talk to her or call the landlord, you'd be more effective and less confrontational ... and she might get the hint, since she'll have to deal with other people (who she won't suspect are prompted by you). If they instead call the landloard, likely he'll realize there's a problem because it's coming from several people, not just one. It's easy to call one guy crazy, but when several agree, there's reason to re-examine the matter.

(08-06-2012, 09:42 PM)newyorkcatholic Wrote: Smoke alarm in the hall is a good idea.

I'd object for the same reason as the stink bomb. The hallway is common property, not your property. It's not your place to police this common property. The problem is not that smoke is getting into the common area, but that an unreasonable amount of smoke is getting into your private property. It is the landlords place to police the common area, or if he's not willing to do anything, then perhaps a contingent of tenants could do so.

Doing anything to the public area is just aping her. You're trying to solve her polluting the common area by polluting the common area (with smell or noise).

When she gets annoyed with the alarm and takes it down, are you going to make a stink about it? (Pardon the pun). If you have the "right" to put it up, then she has the "right" to take it down. The area is equally yours and hers and every other tenant's.

And again, trying to talk again and ask why she can't close the door may give you and idea of how to solve the problem. Above, I suggested that perhaps she wants cooler air, or a breeze. Perhaps with the same money you would spend on trying to annoy her, you could actually fix the problem. Perhaps finding a used box fan for her window (which is probably less than a smoke detector) and an extension cord would make her happy enough to close the door and perhaps be more friendly.

Then there's always the risk of having the landlord (who should be on your side), start looking at you as the annoyance for spraying a foul smell in the hallway or installing devices without his permission.

Fighting this fire with fire isn't going to help. You have to be smarter (and nobler) than her.
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#34
(08-07-2012, 12:10 PM)MagisterMusicae Wrote: you're turning a small matter (a lady being rude and inconsiderate in leaving her door open) into grounds for a building-wide petition.

If the original post is an accurate account of the situation, its not a small matter.

NewYorkCatholic I feel for you here, I will pray to the Holy Mother of God for a resolution.

Two small possibilities: (i) Is there an health and safety department that you can contact?
                                            (ii) It might be a matter of fire prevention. If theres a fire in her patch the open door would enable it to spread through 
                                                the whole building easier. Obviously its allowed to leave your door open from time to time, but perhaps  its a fire hazard if its open continuously. This might be an silly thing to say, but its worth a thought.


Oh, and finally, if i knew for sure that it would do the trick, would I stink her out? For sure. I don't think it would do any good though. Perhaps you could find out which animals she doesn't like and let a pack of them into the hallway a cupla times, go all Dr Doolitle on her.
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#35
Is it only ex cops that can muster facial expressions designed to "intimidate and motivate"?  Just give "the look" while muttering "close. the. door." and let her imagination (think Dexter) do the rest....

Non violent. Legal. Effective.
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#36
(08-07-2012, 03:30 PM)LiberaNosIesu Wrote:
(08-07-2012, 12:10 PM)MagisterMusicae Wrote: you're turning a small matter (a lady being rude and inconsiderate in leaving her door open) into grounds for a building-wide petition.

If the original post is an accurate account of the situation, its not a small matter.

Of course the situation is not a pittance. Not in reality. However, if you read my comment carefully before retorting, you'd see that I was referring to the impression he would give the landlord by collecting signatures.

A landlord who is as hands-off as he seems to be here is going to think a list of signatures from a guy who wants a lady to shut her door is making a mountain out of a molehill.

He might respond to lots of people complaining. That is because it will appear there is a general consensus that there is a problem -- it's not just one man collecting signatures, but many people seeing a common problem, and thus perhaps there is a real problem.
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#37
Have you considered an air filtration system in your apartment?  A good filter can negate all kinds of noxious fumes and make breathing much, much easier.  We have one in our house and it made a huge difference for our daughter during the recent wild fires (she has smoke and ash induced asthma).  It would be nice to think that a woman who is filling the hall with second hand smoke would listen to reason and restrain herself.  But, you do live in New York and people in New York are not the most polite individuals on the planet.  It seems to me that instead of expecting others to be responsible, it may be easier to find solutions for your family and leave idiots who want to kill themselves with cigarettes to themselves.
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#38
(08-07-2012, 04:38 PM)MagisterMusicae Wrote:
(08-07-2012, 03:30 PM)LiberaNosIesu Wrote:
(08-07-2012, 12:10 PM)MagisterMusicae Wrote: you're turning a small matter (a lady being rude and inconsiderate in leaving her door open) into grounds for a building-wide petition.

If the original post is an accurate account of the situation, its not a small matter.

Of course the situation is not a pittance. Not in reality. However, if you read my comment carefully before retorting, you'd see that I was referring to the impression he would give the landlord by collecting signatures.

A landlord who is as hands-off as he seems to be here is going to think a list of signatures from a guy who wants a lady to shut her door is making a mountain out of a molehill.

He might respond to lots of people complaining. That is because it will appear there is a general consensus that there is a problem -- it's not just one man collecting signatures, but many people seeing a common problem, and thus perhaps there is a real problem.

Okay, I understand. I apologise for in my rashness and having misunderstood. I assumed that the parenthesis described 'the small matter'. Pax.
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#39
My suggestion about the smoke alarm was to check and see if there wasn't one in the hallway already, if not tell the landlord and if he doesn't have one then call the fire dept. to get him to comply. I don't think a tenant should put one in the hallway on their own initiative.

C.
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#40
(08-07-2012, 06:46 PM)Cetil Wrote: My suggestion about the smoke alarm was to check and see if there wasn't one in the hallway already, if not tell the landlord and if he doesn't have one then call the fire dept. to get him to comply. I don't think a tenant should put one in the hallway on their own initiative.

C.

That's how I understood you, and that's what I thought was a good idea.
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