Cooking Rice
#11
Rice cookers are great if you eat rice every day or even every meal -- lots of families just make it every morning and have the rice for all day (sort of like how many Americans make their coffee in the drip coffee maker daily).

We have moved away from that a bit - we make coffee in a French press, and rice in a pot with water.  It requires more attention but doesn't take long, and I rather like it.

Even brown rice doesn't take me an hour though.

So Rosarium, how often would you eat only rice as a meal?  Aren't you concerned about not getting enough varied nutrients (even in good brown rice) without eating some vegetables in the meal?  And what about protein?
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#12
I use a rice cooker.  We don't have rice every day, though.  My husband -- he's Filipino -- loves rice but I tire of it easily.
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#13
(08-08-2012, 09:02 AM)Habitual_Ritual Wrote: Rice is great SHTF food also.It will store almost indefinitely if you keep it dry and away from the critters.

No it is not.

Brown rice, rice that will not lead to beriberi if used as the bulk of the diet, will spoil in not too long a time.

Of course, nutritionally vacant white rice can be kept longer, but that is hardly useful.

I think a renewable source of food is necessary for a "SHTF" situation.
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#14
(08-08-2012, 05:49 PM)OCLittleFlower Wrote: I use a rice cooker.  We don't have rice every day, though.  My husband -- he's Filipino -- loves rice but I tire of it easily.

How sad...
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#15
(08-08-2012, 10:00 AM)newyorkcatholic Wrote: So Rosarium, how often would you eat only rice as a meal?  Aren't you concerned about not getting enough varied nutrients (even in good brown rice) without eating some vegetables in the meal?  And what about protein?

I do not know. I generally eat a single food often for a time, and switch it as I feel to.

I could potentially eat it everyday for a week or not at all for over a month.

I am not concerned about anything. By saying rice is the meal I meant that the rice dish is the meal. That is to say, it is not a small bowl to the side of the plate.

I generally cook rice with lentils and this is very good. I did not do this yesterday, as I wanted to try out the rice cooker with the basic operation of cooking rice.

"Protein" is a a species specific, function specific, chain of amino acids. Vegetables have all the amino acids humans need.

But that is all theory really. If I had a deficiency, I'd have signs of it. I do not. Therefore, the way I eat is sufficient regardless of why.
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#16
(08-07-2012, 09:13 PM)moneil Wrote: I’m surprised your rice is taking an hour; whether I stove top cook or use the rice cooker it’s usually 20 minutes.  However I use white rice.  I mostly buy rice from bulk bins at my local food co-op or a warehouse grocery store and usually rotate between basmati and jasmine.  Perhaps the brown and wild rice take longer.
I estimated that the cooking time, "kept warm" time, and the time it took for me to start eating it would be around an hour. Actual cooking time was about 40 minutes I think.

White rice is very different from a whole grain. One uses a lot more water and has to cook it much longer. The white version of the rice I was eating uses about half the amount of water and time for cooking.

Quote:While I eat more potatoes (reds usually) and pasta than rice, it’s a nice diversion.  If there is left over rice I never throw it away.  The next day I’ll toss it into a stir fry with vegetables, or stir fry it with chopped onions and put two fried eggs (soft yolk) on top ~ standard breakfast fare from my Peace Corps days in Colombia.  It can be tossed into just about any soup also.

Potatoes are great. I eat them by the pound. I eat russet potatoes usually. I like to eat cabbage or kale with them.

I eat some pasta too. I like ptitim or penne with broccoli. I usually avoid eating too much wheat though.
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#17
(08-08-2012, 10:00 AM)newyorkcatholic Wrote: Rice cookers are great if you eat rice every day or even every meal –

I agree if one is talking about those large ones.  In my former town and parish there was a sizable Pilipino community which did block rosaries every evening of every day of October, with a pot luck afterwards.  There would be a half dozen of those big rice cookers going.

Mine is small (holds 3 cups water max), with a vegetable steamer basket that can be set on top.  I like it for my occasional use because I can start it and go work outside or go to the store or whatever and not have to watch it.  When it is finished it shuts off automatically.

(08-08-2012, 10:00 AM)newyorkcatholic Wrote: We have moved away from that a bit - we make coffee in a French press, and rice in a pot with water.  It requires more attention but doesn't take long, and I rather like it.

I love my French press, the only way I make coffee (except at work where a drip machine is more practical when the thermos runs out).

(08-08-2012, 08:32 PM)Crusader_Philly Wrote:
(08-08-2012, 05:49 PM)OCLittleFlower Wrote: I use a rice cooker.  We don't have rice every day, though.  My husband -- he's Filipino -- loves rice but I tire of it easily.

How sad...

Well, that would be a matter of perspective  :grin:

Being Irish, having done my Peace Corps service in Colombia (the potato is native to the Andes), and living on the ID / WA boarder (#1 [21.2%] and #2 [19.1%]) ranked states in potato production respectively), I LOVE my potatoes, cooked just about any way they can be cooked.  I have an uncle who jests “A meal without potatoes is hardly worth saying grace over”.

What is sad to an extent is that the Russet Burbank variety in the U.S. has been so hyper bred for maximum crop production (and for specialty applications like frozen french fries and hash browns and instant mashed potatoes) that a lot of the flavor has been lost.  When I was in Colombia, and traveling in Ecuador and Peru, I experienced the heirloom native varieties and now look for those seasonally at Farmer’s Markets and Food Co-op’s.

When I lived in Colombia (1973 – 1976) it was not uncommon to be served rice and potatoes in the same meal.
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#18
(08-07-2012, 08:21 PM)Crusader_Philly Wrote:
(08-07-2012, 08:20 PM)Rosarium Wrote:
Quote: It's a filipino thing.
Also Mexican, Dominican, Puerto Rican, Indian, Bengali, Chinese, Vietnamese, Korean, Japanese, etc.  :P

Not the Mexicans or Latinos I know. For the other Asians, yes.

It is a staple.  Then again, depending on from which part of Mexico you (or anyone for that matter) come, the diet will be different.
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#19
(08-08-2012, 11:30 PM)The Curt Jester Wrote:
(08-07-2012, 08:21 PM)Crusader_Philly Wrote:
(08-07-2012, 08:20 PM)Rosarium Wrote:
Quote: It's a filipino thing.
Also Mexican, Dominican, Puerto Rican, Indian, Bengali, Chinese, Vietnamese, Korean, Japanese, etc.  :P

Not the Mexicans or Latinos I know. For the other Asians, yes.

It is a staple.  Then again, depending on from which part of Mexico you (or anyone for that matter) come, the diet will be different.

Maybe el Bajío is different. That's all I can point to.
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#20
Rice is life!  At least, that 's what they say here in the Philippines. 
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