Altar Girls
#51
Though this doesn't concern the Roman Rite, it is historically interesting to note that St. Ephrem is known to have trained women's choirs for singing in the church.  They sometimes sang one half of certain dialogue hymns (a peculiarly Syriac genre), with a men's choir singing the other.  Sometimes they sang both halves.  The madrashe, or "teaching hymns," which were hymns sung by a choir with a congregational antiphon (much like the Roman Invitatory) and the genre for which St. Ephrem is chiefly known, were certainly sung by women choirs.
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#52
First they came for the choirs... and I didn't speak up because I'm tone deaf
and then they came for the altar boys, and I didn't speak up because I have a lisp and can't speak Latin well
and then they came for the lectors, and I didn't speak up because I'm afraid to read in public
and then they came for the priests...

and now we have no Mass.
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