Confession Question
#11
Not sure if you do this already, but you should always puncuate your confession with "for these and all my sins I am sorry." This covers you for things you may not have remembered to confess. It demonstrates your contrition and intention to confess all mortal sins you are aware of.
Reply
#12
(08-16-2012, 10:18 AM)MRose Wrote:
(08-16-2012, 10:06 AM)MagisterMusicae Wrote: If you can find a good confessor, remember, you don't need mortal sins go to confession. In fact, confession can be a remedy to help prevent mortal sin, and gain sacramental grace to avoid falling into sin, as well as washing the soul of past sins.

This is good advice!

Just to clarify, mortal sins are not necessary for Confession, but venial sins are - you must have some actual sins to confess, otherwise there will be no matter for the Sacrament.

I think you can confess venial sins that you may have committed but are not sure about.  I understand that most people commit at least involuntary venial sins (or have imperfections, even if not sin) more than they realize.  You can also confess past sins.  Just tell the priest what you are confessing or unsure about.

HOWEVER a priest may tell you that you are being scrupulous for going to confession too often.  But don't assume that is the case.  Confession gives great sacramental grace even when you express your sorrow over small imperfections or past sins.
Reply
#13
Thanks, everyone. Actually, the only part of the "Confession" that happened was the absolution. I didn't get to say anything except the sins that he elicited through questions. I thought that we were just chatting the whole time, that he was just getting to know me, and that a proper Confession was reserved until the end of the meeting.

I didn't get to mention all of my sins. He wouldn't even let me unfold my list. I kept on bringing it up, but he won't let me. That and he did say that I should confess to him no more frequent than every six months if I want to stay in his parish--since I'd be confessing the same sins anyway.

During our conversation, I also brought up the issue of my being torn between staying with my family (my folks doesn't want to me to leave) and going abroad to teach. I said that I really want to travel, but I also want to stay to help my family, stay close to them, and follow the wish of my parents. He advised me to make plans behind my parents' back, and just leave within a week's notice.

The entire experience left me disturbed and anxious. Since I'm in a state where my I'm trying to build a healthy relationship with my family, overcoming my vices and addictions, AND trying really hard to be a good Catholic, hearing from a priest that my mom was "manipulating" me so I'll stay home, and that I don't need to stay very close to the Church was like being poisoned, to be quite honest. I did not feel any peace nor feel any consolation after the meeting. I was truly, deeply disturbed.

I, too, am scared that this priest will say the same thing to others... how do I go about reporting him? Or do I speak with him first?

Oh, and I'll be going to Confession this Saturday.
Reply
#14
Do you repent of your sins? If so God is faithful and merciful to forgive them.


The sacrifices of God are a broken spirit: a broken and a contrite heart, O God, thou wilt not despise.


That little voice in your head telling you that you may not be forgiven is the devil trying to steal your peace and cause you to despair. He is a liar. Don't listen to him.

Reply
#15
(08-16-2012, 10:18 AM)MRose Wrote:
(08-16-2012, 10:06 AM)MagisterMusicae Wrote: If you can find a good confessor, remember, you don't need mortal sins go to confession. In fact, confession can be a remedy to help prevent mortal sin, and gain sacramental grace to avoid falling into sin, as well as washing the soul of past sins.

This is good advice!

Just to clarify, mortal sins are not necessary for Confession, but venial sins are - you must have some actual sins to confess, otherwise there will be no matter for the Sacrament.

You are wrong if you mean that you must be presently guilty of sin for there to be a valid confession. The matter of the sacrament of penance consists of the acts of the penitent: contrition, confession, and satisfaction. Hence, general confessions are possible, because contrition, the only part of the matter that deals with sin itself, is not exclusive to present sins. St. Thomas Aquinas says as much (concerning whether contrition can be for past sins, that is) in the second question of the supplement to the Summa Theologica.

Now, if one was not guilty of any sins at all at the time of confession, there would be  no sacramental effect--namely, the forgiveness of sins, as there is nothing to forgive. But there would probably be other, non-sacramental effects, and for this reason Saint Ignatius of Loyola and Saint Francis de Sales can recommend general confessions.
Reply




Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)