Did you know Franz Liszt was in the minor orders?
#11
Liszt was unmatched as a transcriber of other composer's materials.  Aside from the Beethoven symphonies various Wagner transcriptions of Overtures, he did thousands of other works.

Among the many Schubert song transcriptions is this one.  A very good recording by Jorge Bolet of "Auf dem Wasser zu Singen."




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#12
Frederic Lamond was one of Liszt's last pupils. (Liszt died in 1886)

In 1945 Lamond recorded his recollections of Liszt.

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#13
In those days classical music was the music everyone listened to , today it has a small following and opera and orchestra's are only kept functioning in most cities by rich people or the arts council funding them, they don't sell many tickets or sell many Cd's
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#14
Yes! I actually heard Listz's story told from the pulpit just the other day. Good stuff.
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#15
(08-20-2012, 08:12 AM)The_Harlequin_King Wrote: Despite having probably slept with every other princess or noblewoman in Europe before ordination (one illegitimate daughter who resulted from a tryst with a countess ended up marrying Richard Wagner), the Catholic Encyclopedia says he took his duties as a cleric quite seriously.

An interesting perspective is gained from reading Liszt's own thoughts on these matters from his later years.  I'm up to the point where he's 21 in his biography by Walker and the affairs are becoming an issue.  His mother was working feverishly to get him married in order to "calm his nerves."  In most cases it was a situation where he was brought in to play the piano and was introduced to the various countesses who Alan Walker describes as "young, beautiful and often neglected by elderly rich husbands."  And from there the gossipy noblewomen of the salons would tell their "war stories" to each other and then provoke each other into throwing themselves at Liszt at every opportunity. 

The fact that Liszt survived, kept his faith and repented despite his weakness is a good testament to God's grace.  The temptations were extraordinary, the sins were grave and the grace was present to enable Liszt to carry through and repent and deal with the consequences of his sins as best he could.  His mother is at least superficially a St. Monica type of character in that she helped him by practically raising his 3 children that he had with Marie D'Agoult. 

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#16
(08-22-2012, 09:53 AM)Gerard Wrote: An interesting perspective is gained from reading Liszt's own thoughts on these matters from his later years.  I'm up to the point where he's 21 in his biography by Walker and the affairs are becoming an issue.  His mother was working feverishly to get him married in order to "calm his nerves."  In most cases it was a situation where he was brought in to play the piano and was introduced to the various countesses who Alan Walker describes as "young, beautiful and often neglected by elderly rich husbands."  And from there the gossipy noblewomen of the salons would tell their "war stories" to each other and then provoke each other into throwing themselves at Liszt at every opportunity. 

Interesting. Thanks. That sounds like the plot of every other dirty period romance novel out there.
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#17
Yes, I read about him becoming an "abbé" and didn't look any further into it. I knew about the mania too. I mentioned on the rock thread to show it isn't only rock music that has had a "mania" phenomenon. I pray he's in heaven! Nice music there then.  :)
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#18
Wasn't Chopin a repentant Catholic as well? I'll have to read the Liszt biography whenever I find the time.
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#19
Yes. A revert on his deathbed. Definately a story worth reading!
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#20
(08-22-2012, 09:57 AM)The_Harlequin_King Wrote:
(08-22-2012, 09:53 AM)Gerard Wrote: An interesting perspective is gained from reading Liszt's own thoughts on these matters from his later years.  I'm up to the point where he's 21 in his biography by Walker and the affairs are becoming an issue.  His mother was working feverishly to get him married in order to "calm his nerves."  In most cases it was a situation where he was brought in to play the piano and was introduced to the various countesses who Alan Walker describes as "young, beautiful and often neglected by elderly rich husbands."  And from there the gossipy noblewomen of the salons would tell their "war stories" to each other and then provoke each other into throwing themselves at Liszt at every opportunity. 

Interesting. Thanks. That sounds like the plot of every other dirty period romance novel out there.
...except for the repentence part.
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