Digital Bible pops up in more pews, pulpits. Only in the NO....
#11
I think if I brought my iPad to church my parish priest would throw me and the iPad out the window. He hates technology other than the phone and his beeping watch. He'd rather horse and buggy than car, but we're not Amish for goodness sake.
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#12
There is absolutely nothing wrong with the faithful using an iPad or smartphone as a substitute for a missal or, in the case of a schola, as an emergency Liber. However, I would certainly oppose it becoming a substitute for written texts used in liturgical ceremonies.
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#13
I hate the idea. Greatly. I think I'll follow St. Pius X's lead and reject it. It's one thing to use technology at home, it's another for a priest to use it at Mass.
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#14
(08-21-2012, 06:36 PM)TraditionalistThomas Wrote: I hate the idea. Greatly. I think I'll follow St. Pius X's lead and reject it. It's one thing to use technology at home, it's another for a priest to use it at Mass.

Does your church have electric lights, or candles only? If it has restrooms, do they have modern plumbing, or is it just a pit toilet? If the priest has less than perfect vision, does he wear glasses? Technology isn't necessarily evil.
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#15
Nice title, and yet the only reference to the NO in the article comes from the Arch of Detroit and the idea of using digital texts is soundly rejected.  Huh.

I know a lot of trads have trouble with reading comprehension, whether in digital or paper mediums, but good grief.  I'm left to conclude that misrepresenting something so grievously generally makes one a flying doucebag, but since it's done in the name of tearing down the NO, it's all good. 

Damn those facts.  Always ruining a good anti-NO bitchfest.  :bronxcheer:
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#16
(08-21-2012, 06:40 PM)Grasshopper Wrote:
(08-21-2012, 06:36 PM)TraditionalistThomas Wrote: I hate the idea. Greatly. I think I'll follow St. Pius X's lead and reject it. It's one thing to use technology at home, it's another for a priest to use it at Mass.

Does your church have electric lights, or candles only? If it has restrooms, do they have modern plumbing, or is it just a pit toilet? If the priest has less than perfect vision, does he wear glasses? Technology isn't necessarily evil.

Candles are technology too. So where do we draw the line? Maybe back at the Garden of Eden with the animal skins God gave Adam and Eve? That would be for the Trads, I guess. We might then see some NO folk going for the fig leaf in order to be immodest.
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#17

He who has eyes can see that digital Bibles are not being used "Only in the NO"; your constant anger at a form of the Mass approved by the Pope and celebrated by the Pope is hardly becoming behavior for a Catholic and does not contribute to peace in the tank.  I believe that Vox has said that discussion of the Ordinary Form or Novus Ordo should be confined to the Extraordinary Form (Diocesan) "vs." SSPX Discussion Forum.  

For me, the Kindle is a medical device essential to my well-being.  I cannot hold a book or turn the pages without pain since I have systemic lupus erythematosus and rheumatoid arthritis which cause a lot of joint pain, especially in my hands and wrists.  Those who love to read can imagine what a trial this has been for me.  Before the Kindle, I had to have the spines cut off my books and read them a page at a time.

On my Kindle I have the Douai-Rheims Bible, and an interlinear Latin/English Vulgate.  My Kindle also has the complete Summa Theologica of St. Thomas Aquinas and his On Prayer and the Meditative Life; St. Augustine's City of God and his Confessions; St. Teresa of Avila's Life, the Way of Perfection, Interior Castle; St. Catherine of Siena's Dialogue and her Letters; Thomas a Kempis' the Imitation of Christ; St. Therese of Lisieux's The Story of a Soul; the Catechism of St. Pius X; the Baltimore Catechism; Alban Butler's The Lives of the Fathers, Martyrs, and Principal Saints; Fr. Candide Chalippe's The Life and Legends of Saint Francis of Assisi; John Henry Cardinal Newman's Loss and Gain, the Story of a Convert; the Didache; several devotional books, and almost everything G.K. Chesterton and Robert Hugh Benson ever wrote.  For all of those books, I don't think I've paid more than $5-6 total since most are free, being out of copyright.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         
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#18
(08-21-2012, 10:31 PM)Revixit Wrote: On my Kindle I have the Douai-Rheims Bible, and an interlinear Latin/English Vulgate.  My Kindle also has the complete Summa Theologica of St. Thomas Aquinas and his On Prayer and the Meditative Life; St. Augustine's City of God and his Confessions; St. Teresa of Avila's Life, the Way of Perfection, Interior Castle; St. Catherine of Siena's Dialogue and her Letters; Thomas a Kempis' the Imitation of Christ; St. Therese of Lisieux's The Story of a Soul; the Catechism of St. Pius X; the Baltimore Catechism; Alban Butler's The Lives of the Fathers, Martyrs, and Principal Saints; Fr. Candide Chalippe's The Life and Legends of Saint Francis of Assisi; John Henry Cardinal Newman's Loss and Gain, the Story of a Convert; the Didache; several devotional books, and almost everything G.K. Chesterton and Robert Hugh Benson ever wrote.  For all of those books, I don't think I've paid more than $5-6 total since most are free, being out of copyright.

This alone is a good advertisement for the Kindle (or a similar device). I have about half of the books mentioned, all as physical books, and have paid several hundred dollars for them. The two Bibles alone were well over a hundred dollars. Even when you add in the price of the Kindle itself, Revixit is still ahead. And most of the greatest books ever written (secular as well as religious) are out of copyright (and therefore available cheaply in digital form). I am jealous.
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#19
(08-21-2012, 06:36 PM)TraditionalistThomas Wrote: I hate the idea. Greatly. I think I'll follow St. Pius X's lead and reject it.

St. Pius X addressed the used of iPads? ...  ???
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#20
(08-21-2012, 10:50 PM)Grasshopper Wrote:
(08-21-2012, 10:31 PM)Revixit Wrote: On my Kindle I have the Douai-Rheims Bible, and an interlinear Latin/English Vulgate.  My Kindle also has the complete Summa Theologica of St. Thomas Aquinas and his On Prayer and the Meditative Life; St. Augustine's City of God and his Confessions; St. Teresa of Avila's Life, the Way of Perfection, Interior Castle; St. Catherine of Siena's Dialogue and her Letters; Thomas a Kempis' the Imitation of Christ; St. Therese of Lisieux's The Story of a Soul; the Catechism of St. Pius X; the Baltimore Catechism; Alban Butler's The Lives of the Fathers, Martyrs, and Principal Saints; Fr. Candide Chalippe's The Life and Legends of Saint Francis of Assisi; John Henry Cardinal Newman's Loss and Gain, the Story of a Convert; the Didache; several devotional books, and almost everything G.K. Chesterton and Robert Hugh Benson ever wrote.  For all of those books, I don't think I've paid more than $5-6 total since most are free, being out of copyright.

This alone is a good advertisement for the Kindle (or a similar device). I have about half of the books mentioned, all as physical books, and have paid several hundred dollars for them. The two Bibles alone were well over a hundred dollars. Even when you add in the price of the Kindle itself, Revixit is still ahead. And most of the greatest books ever written (secular as well as religious) are out of copyright (and therefore available cheaply in digital form). I am jealous.

And I don't seem to have mentioned that I have another 250-350 books on my Kindle besides the ones I listed, and got most of them free, too!  I don't know exactly how many because I had to start setting up "Collections" to sort them when I got up around 200 books.  Before I separated them, the device kept count of how many books I had.  There may be a way to get a count within collections; Kindle users are always figuring out new things you can do, putting together an e-book and giving it away or selling it for 99¢. There are many 99¢
books as well as free ones (and $1.99, $2.99, etc.) A well-known Fishie sells a Clementine Vulgate for 99¢.

Other books I have include classics like the Iliad and the Odyssey, Canterbury Tales, all of Shakespeare's plays in one volume, Thomas Hardy, Dickens, Balzac, Hawthorne, etc.  I discovered some Victorian authors who were widely read back in the day, then forgotten.  Hugh Benson was one of them, though I found that some well-read Fishies already knew of him.  Almost all of his books are free on Kindle.  I don't know how publishers are getting away with selling books out of copyright but some are doing it and they have one or two of Benson's -- and no free version is available.  Once I saw that, I started grabbing every free book I could get in case more publishers started doing this.  I don't know if they pay to extend copyright or what.  It's not as if the authors and their heirs are being deprived of money when a book has been out of print for 72 years.

You can get new books free, too.  Often they're by new authors and it's obviously a good way for them to get readers to buy their next book.  Some are really good, others are so-so, but so far I've only met one or two I gave up on.  Some books by well-known authors are free on Tuesdays (thru Wednesdays, I think; I usually forget to look).  I got a Harry Bosch mystery by Michael Connelly free, have paid for a number of his books in paperback.  Most new Kindle books are $9.99; some start higher and I wait to see if the price will come down, which it usually does.

Another great thing about the Kindle is that if your Kindle is stolen or just "dies,"
Amazon will send you new 'copies' of every Kindle book you ever bought!!!

Of course you'd have to buy a new Kindle for them to send the books to but getting the books back is a great deal, especially the ones you paid for.  I have bought a good many Kindle books but I buy fewer books than I used to since I have so many classics on hand.

I don't know whether other e-readers have that guarantee about replacing books but I'd sure find out before buying one!

You can delete books from Kindle if you don't think you'll read them again and if you change your mind, they'll send a 'replacement' to you.  I had discarded a book and then wanted to look up something in it so I got a replacement, which also served to prove that they really do replace books.

Usual disclaimer:  I do not work for Amazon; am just a satisfied customer.



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