Rebuilding Christendom Conference This Weekend in DC
#31
(08-23-2012, 09:37 PM)DrBombay Wrote:
(08-23-2012, 03:16 PM)The_Harlequin_King Wrote:
(08-23-2012, 10:47 AM)FHM310 Wrote: (And, totally off-topic, but does anyone else miss the *relatively* more innocent version of  Batman from back then, compared to the new versions? )

Nope. The campy Adam West Batman was a post-Vatican II monstrosity aimed to attract wider audiences... much like the Novus Ordo Mass. Frank Miller (author of The Dark Knight Returns in 1986, which brought Batman back to his darker roots) was like the Archbishop Lefebvre of the Batman continuity.

That's my opinion as well.  It's really comparing apples and oranges.  The 60s teevee series was an entirely different animal than the movies. 

That's interesting; I didn't know that Batman had dark roots.  Not very familiar with any of them, really (including the original comic); it's just that the newer movies look so completely dark and unappealing to me in every way, they make the old campy series look more appealing, by comparison, than it ever was. 

Anyway, back to to topic....
Reply
#32
A little more off topic, I don't remember the Batman comics being as dark as portrayed today. I used to rush to get him, Superman, Superboy, Supergirl, Green Lantern, and more than I can remember now. Me and my pals would rush in the summer to the Elevated train station at the edge of Uptown because it always had the comics and Galaxy magazine first. We'd each buy one and a bottle of 16 oz. RC cola, and sit under the train tracks in the shade and rubbish and switch 'em until we read and imagined all kinds of things from 'em all. RC cola was 10 cents plus 2 cents deposit on the bottle, and when you returned it you could get 4 bullseyes or Maryjanes for the 2 cents. What a morning when you're an eleven year old boy.

back to your discussion,

tim
Reply
#33
(08-24-2012, 09:51 AM)Tim Wrote: A little more off topic, I don't remember the Batman comics being as dark as portrayed today. I used to rush to get him, Superman, Superboy, Supergirl, Green Lantern, and more than I can remember now. Me and my pals would rush in the summer to the Elevated train station at the edge of Uptown because it always had the comics and Galaxy magazine first. We'd each buy one and a bottle of 16 oz. RC cola, and sit under the train tracks in the shade and rubbish and switch 'em until we read and imagined all kinds of things from 'em all. RC cola was 10 cents plus 2 cents deposit on the bottle, and when you returned it you could get 4 bullseyes or Maryjanes for the 2 cents. What a morning when you're an eleven year old boy.

back to your discussion,

tim

Tim, have you seen the latest Captain America movie? It could have been better (CA didn't actually fight a Nazi during the whole movie, what gives?) but your story reminds me of a scene at the end of the movie where a bunch of boys with sticks are playing soldiers in NYC right after the war and one has a trashcan lid painted like Captain's shield. Did you ever play like that?
Reply
#34
(08-24-2012, 09:20 AM)FHM310 Wrote: That's interesting; I didn't know that Batman had dark roots.  Not very familiar with any of them, really (including the original comic); it's just that the newer movies look so completely dark and unappealing to me in every way, they make the old campy series look more appealing, by comparison, than it ever was. 

Batman has a long history of changing with different generations. When he first came out (before World War II), he actually used guns. But in 1940, the editors at DC Comics had him disarmed because it was considered inappropriate at that time for vigilantes (private citizens) to be seen brandishing guns against criminals.

[Image: batman-2.jpg]


Now, that being said, Batman's hatred of guns has been such a staple of his character since then that it would be bizarre if future writers ever tried to depict him going to town on criminals with an assault rifle.

I believe the new movies are brilliant adaptations for this generation. They're thoroughly retro in their own way, even though it doesn't appear so on the surface. I can't think of anything I'd do differently if I were the director, except recast the female leads. Read
Reply
#35
Richard, we played WWII all the time or Chicago soft ball in the street with the sewer covers for bases. If you've seen movie reels from Brooklyn in those days it was simiiar to their stick ball. My father bought me and my brother replica M-1 rifles made from wood and steel, and he'd also buy us war surplus stuff to play with and give us the straight skinny on it's real purposes. We were the only two with real WWII helmets. It was grand pretending to kill nazis.

tim
Reply




Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)