The old church ladies strike again: Spanish fresco ruined
#21
(08-22-2012, 07:27 PM)Crusader_Philly Wrote:
(08-22-2012, 05:12 PM)Mithrandylan Wrote: Draw and quarter her maybe?

I don't think women were ever hanged, drawn, and quartered. HK would know for sure.

St. Margaret of Clitherow was crushed under a door piled with stones.
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#22
This is symbolic to what elderly women have done to NO parishes through the years.
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#23
Is that Jesus or Mr. Kotter?

(08-22-2012, 02:01 PM)The_Harlequin_King Wrote: [Image: _62428391_frescopic.gif][Image: capuchin.jpg]
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#24
(08-22-2012, 07:40 PM)piabee Wrote:
(08-22-2012, 07:27 PM)Crusader_Philly Wrote:
(08-22-2012, 05:12 PM)Mithrandylan Wrote: Draw and quarter her maybe?

I don't think women were ever hanged, drawn, and quartered. HK would know for sure.

St. Margaret of Clitherow was crushed under a door piled with stones.

'Pressing' as it was known was used in the case of an individual who refused to plead to the charge.

From Wikipedia:
Quote:Peine forte et dure (Law French for "hard and forceful punishment") was a method of torture formerly used in the common law legal system, in which a defendant who refused to plead ("stood mute") would be subjected to having heavier and heavier stones placed upon his or her chest until a plea was entered, or as the weight of the stones on the chest became too great for the condemned to breathe, fatal suffocation would occur.

The most famous case in the United Kingdom was that of Roman Catholic martyr St Margaret Clitherow, who (in order to avoid a trial in which her own children would be obliged to give evidence) was pressed to death on March 25, 1586, after refusing to plead to the charge of having harboured Catholic (then outlawed) priests in her house. She died within fifteen minutes under a weight of at least 700 pounds (320 kg).
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#25
What a horrific way to die.
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#26
(08-22-2012, 07:50 PM)Neo-Floriano Wrote: This is symbolic to what elderly women have done to NO parishes through the years.

To be fair this “phenomena” existed prior to the Novus Ordo.  My mind seems to recall some examples stretching back to even medieval times, but I don’t have time to look up details.

A couple of more recent examples though …

A Jesuit pastor in Seattle (now deceased) on the occasion of his 50th anniversary (of profession or ordination, I don’t remember) was asked in an interview to comment on “decision making” in a parish pre and post VII.  He reflected that today there are Parish Councils, Finance Committees (which are canonically mandated) and a host of other consultative bodies that can be called upon to advise a pastor.   In the “old day” he followed a different process.  Every morning after Mass he would return to the rectory and the housekeeper would serve him breakfast in the dinning room.  In addition to the morning papers there would be a telephone on the dinning room table.  If Father was wondering what reaction there might be to a decision he might make he would pick up the phone and make an “faux call” explaining his decision to an imaginary person, knowing full well that the housekeeper would have her ear glued to the kitchen door, listening to everything he said.  After breakfast Father would go to his office and the housekeeper would get on the phone, calling her “circle” informing them of everything Father had said.  Shortly after the phone in Father’s office would start ringing, and he would have his feedback.

Another priest I once knew was a Sulpacian who had been on the faculty of St. Thomas Seminary in Kenmore, WA (Archdiocese of Seattle) which most seminarians from the Diocese of Spokane, WA attended.  This priest told of one of the finest seminarians he had known (and this person was also one of the holiest priests I’ve known), and the bizarre circumstance he found himself in at his first assignment after ordination (sometime in the late 1950’s).  In a large parish in Spokane (I do not know which, I might have been able to track it all down if I tried, but it never seemed worth the time) there had been a very, shall we say, “domineering” nun who had been the school principal and the superior of the convent for a considerable time.  When her order proposed to reassign her she left religious life and talked the pastor into hiring her as the rectory housekeeper.  From that position she continued exert an influence (perhaps “control” would be a better word, based on the context of the story, as it was relayed to me) over all aspects of parish life, just has she had while she was the school principal.  This included setting a curfew on the newly ordained assistant pastor.
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#27
Ah, the old staple of the rectory housekeeper/mistress. At least wayward priests back then were more interested in women than boys.
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#28
She should open up a professional restoration service:

[Image: 540175_454667441234406_536747292_n.jpg]
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#29
(08-24-2012, 04:18 PM)EcceQuamBonum Wrote: She should open up a professional restoration service:

[Image: 540175_454667441234406_536747292_n.jpg]

LOL.
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#30
Here's her ANGRY response! hahahahahah

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