Serving Mass as an altar boy in the 1970's..
#1
I served Mass as an altar boy steadily from 1972-1980.

Has anyone else served Mass fairly soon after the NO was implemented like I did?

And what were your experiences?

Mine where both good [mostly] and some funny.
Reply
#2
Please post, this is something which I believe can shed a light like a laser beam on those terrible times. While the sixties were a lead up, in my mind, the seventies is where the serious destruction took place. I know for certain that's the decade where it occured in society. It's too bad film makers really never captured the war torn look of the big cities then. Those pictures would be a window in to the cynical destruction that was perpetrated from the top down.I think they both went hand in hand.

tim
Reply
#3
I grew up and served in a relatively rural parish in Long Island, NY, Diocese of Rockville Centre, and we had some good priests who were real men.

Our Pastor Father William Flaherty had been an Army Colonel and had been ordained in the 1930's.
We had a Lithuanian Curate named Father Klimas, who had been prisoner in a Soviet Gulag in the '40s and 50's and had been scalped by the commies.

So we had some solid priests I served for, even though they believed they had to implement the NO to be obedient.

We still had 40 Hours Devotion every August with 20-30 priests in choir and all the altar boys.

We still had the old marble atar rails in the 1970's and the Pastor refused to implement Communion in the Hand when the diocese made it "legal" in 75-76.

We also had a yearly Novena given by a great Vincentian named Fr Frederic Gehring who had been a war hero on Guadalcanal:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frederic_Gehring

So our parish had its "1970's" in the 1980's
Kind of.
Reply
#4
I served at Mass from 1963 to about 1970 my junior year in high school. I served at my oldest sisters wedding in 1966. It wasn't until recently that I looked at her wedding album. There were several pictures taken with one of the entire wedding party at the front of the sanctuary. There was my sister and her husband, my sister the brides maid, my other sister (now deceased) and my brother an usher.The altar was still in place and the cranmer table was now in use but the communion rail was in use since CITH hadn't been foisted upon the laity yet. I think the Mass was still in Latin at this point but I'm not quite sure.
Reply
#5
(08-23-2012, 11:04 AM)fatiam13 Wrote: I served at Mass from 1963 to about 1970 my junior year in high school. I served at my oldest sisters wedding in 1966. It wasn't until recently that I looked at her wedding album. There were several pictures taken with one of the entire wedding party at the front of the sanctuary. There was my sister and her husband, my sister the brides maid, my other sister (now deceased) and my brother an usher.The altar was still in place and the cranmer table was now in use but the communion rail was in use since CITH hadn't been foisted upon the laity yet. I think the Mass was still in Latin at this point but I'm not quite sure.
fatiam13

So you obviously had to learn to make the responses in Latin.
How long before you could do it from memory? (where off the card)
Thank you.
Reply
#6
In the Netherlands times were horrible. Not only in the seventies. In my country in most parishes the revolution began even before the ink of Sacrosanctum Concilium had dried.

I did my first communion in 1973 and although I remember nothing special about it, my parents were so shocked, that they took my younger brother from the preperation class the following year, and he did his first communion in one of the few chapels that preserved the Tridentine Mass. My parents were of the happy few who saw very clearly that the 'happy meal-Mass' was not what we believe.

However. In my country the officially approved Missal in translation was not published before 1979 (!) which meant that every parish tried his own experiments. The Latin disappeared, every Mass was in the vernacular... We used in the first years a mix between the old and new texts. I remember very clearly that we made the change from the old confiteor to the new one. I remember that, even when I was so small, because I missed St. Michael and the saints... and we prayed every evening the St. Michael prayer, so... those are things you remember...

Soon I wanted to be an altar boy of course, but... my parents decided that I could only serve at a weekday Mass at wednesday where an old assisting priest celebrated "ad orientem" (*cough*, the church was a new building, not orientated...) ad the side altar. The sunday Mass had every week a 'new theme'. We had a 'liturgist', a priest who later left priesthood for the female director of the parish choir, and he had a group of 'creativity', they made every week a small booklet with new 'liturgy'. When we saw the altar boys standing at the door with those booklets, my father used to take my hand and said: "let's go" and sometimes we went to another church, sometimes not because it was all the same rubbish. I was not allowed to be an accomplice in the booklet-show, and so no altar serving at sundays. Because the revolutionaries never attended Mass on weekdays, we had our 'own' Mass at wednesdays, and we had a rosary group which was not supported by the parish priest (he called it old-fashioned, my mother told me that later) but we were allowed to pray it before Mass. And so I served sometimes at weekdays, but, all I remember was the special smell in the sacristy and the vestments, and of course the bells. :) Oh, before I forgot: we were happy with one weekday Mass, in our parish it was only sundays, saturday evening and wednesday. All the other days the priests didn't celebrate Mass, which is still the same in a lot of parishes here btw.

Later, it was about 1975, we moved from that parish to the chapel of the hospital, where we coincidently discovered that there was also a good Mass. NO of course, the Tridentine Mass I mentioned was in a town 40 kms from our house and soon stopped after that... (I remember the wonderful neogothic atmosphere very well, later I went back and discovered that the fathers of the monastry where it was, stripped everything...  :crazy:) In the Netherlands it was about 1975 not the question whether to find a TLM, but to find a valid NO Mass... And so we went to that hospital chapel and I became altar server there until I went to the seminary 1984. It was in the first years far from perfect, there was no official vernacular liturgy, but the priest used the same texts that were approved later, I thing he used the Flemish Missal, which was earlier. I was a boy of 13 when the Missal came, so what do you know at that age? I just did what they told me to do. There were nuns in the hospital and I loved the atmosphere and there was every day a weekday Mass which I attended and served if I was not in school at that time. We were with a peer group of kids from families who believed the same, we had private lessons on catechism, went to the same chapel, and the boys served Mass there.
When I went for confirmation, 1978, we did it privately prepared in a monastry in an other diocese, where an emeritus-bishop resided. I was 12 at that time. I don't remember a word about it. It was in Latin (that's sure, I know the monastry is still singing in Latin) and the group there was very traditional, and maybe that old bishop used the TLM? Weird maybe, but at 12 I had no clue what that could be. The only thing I remembered from the confirmation lessons at school was, that it was boring and the theme was 'hands'. My parents decided that it was rubbish and so we found private solutions. In exile...

What soon stopped in the hospital chapel where we regulary went to, was the abuse that the congregation prayed parts of the eucharistic prayer with the priest. In a lot of churches, we had the weird habit, that sometimes only the consecration words and a couple of other parts were read by the priest, and the rest all together. Even now we have to fight everywhere we come, that the people are not praying the 'per ipsum' doxology with me, just 'automatically'. Even now!!! Back in time about 1980, we had the good luck that the priest in the hospital discovered more and more that all those revolutions were destructive, and he took op the Roman Collar for himself, better liturgy, Latin sung Mass, and serving was in 1982 already what it is officially in the NO Mass now, with incence, candles, everything. We were so happy with that! However, that priest was persecuted by all the other priests, but because he was in the hospital, he could be more independant.

So. We were sometimes like in exile and it was during those years hard to find a good place for Mass... I simply wasn't allowed to serve idiotic Masses, and my parents were so critical that the protected me from that. It was only later, shortly before I went to the seminary, that I realised things like valid Masses or whatever could go wrong. I was a kid! I do realize however, that in those revolution years, everyone who did not make those choices to be critical, gradually lost their faith. My other relatives did. My friends. Only those who wanted to fight for it, travel, go away from the own parish, survived. I had good luck.
Reply
#7
i was the early 80's just after everything changed at my church... hell i wore regular street clothes when i served (they did make us wear pants though - kinda of strict weren't they)
Reply
#8
Father,
It sounded like you had great and loving parents.
How blessed you were!

Fr., did you have to use the Dutch Catechism at all?
I have heard horrible things about it.
Reply
#9
(08-23-2012, 11:04 AM)fatiam13 Wrote: I served at Mass from 1963 to about 1970 my junior year in high school. I served at my oldest sisters wedding in 1966. It wasn't until recently that I looked at her wedding album. There were several pictures taken with one of the entire wedding party at the front of the sanctuary. There was my sister and her husband, my sister the brides maid, my other sister (now deceased) and my brother an usher.The altar was still in place and the cranmer table was now in use but the communion rail was in use since CITH hadn't been foisted upon the laity yet. I think the Mass was still in Latin at this point but I'm not quite sure.

So you must've served both the Mass of John XXIII, and Paul VI.  Not a big amount of difference looking back now but then it was shocking. Which also means you had to respond in Latin, both those were in Latin. Very interesting.

tim
Reply
#10
(08-23-2012, 11:38 AM)Old Salt Wrote: Father,
It sounded like you had great and loving parents.
How blessed you were!

Fr., did you have to use the Dutch Catechism at all?
I have heard horrible things about it.

NOOOOO!!  :O

We never used that horrible thing! We had a translation of a more Classic one, written by A. Schraner, of course a private translation from a private publisher. Was great and really catholic! :)

Indeed, the infamous Dutch Catechism was a modernist monster. Meanwhile it's all over, nobody reads it anymore. We now have the translated official Catechism of course.

It was a continuous fight agaist all the modernistic priests and bishops in the Netherlands.
When I discoverd my vocation, the local bishop did advice me not to do it (!) and first study theology at a university.
Pfffft  there all the vocations lost their faith! And so I went to a seminary in another diocese.
Reply




Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)