Why Vatican II avoided Communism
#11
(10-04-2012, 08:31 PM)Crusading Philologist Wrote: Something to consider is that Vatican II, or at least its "spirit," was at least partly an attempt to bring the Church closer to liberal humanism. A stronger condemnation of communism would have made it seem as if the Church were throwing in completely with the liberal democracies of the West. I think this is a problem that continues to plague the Church.

I'm surprised nobody has attacked you as a "schismatic" for saying this.
Reply
#12
A condemnation of Communism would be like beating a dead horse. It had already been condemned and in the larger picture sometimes it might be better to make a prudential decision in order to effect a better result. 
Reply
#13
(10-04-2012, 03:14 AM)Geremia Wrote: The real question then is: Why did Pope John XXIII care that much to have Orthodox at a Catholic council?

My thoughts exactly.
Reply
#14
(10-05-2012, 10:04 AM)Richard C Wrote:
(10-04-2012, 03:14 AM)Geremia Wrote: The real question then is: Why did Pope John XXIII care that much to have Orthodox at a Catholic council?

My thoughts exactly.

I think his vision of ecumenism was focused on the Orthodox primarily. He worked in Bulgaria and Greece and I think he had a strong affection for them. Perhaps he realized they are the closest to us, and that reunion was much more realistic a venture with them.
Reply
#15
(10-04-2012, 08:31 PM)Crusading Philologist Wrote: Something to consider is that Vatican II, or at least its "spirit," was at least partly an attempt to bring the Church closer to liberal humanism. A stronger condemnation of communism would have made it seem as if the Church were throwing in completely with the liberal democracies of the West. I think this is a problem that continues to plague the Church.

And communism isn't the epitome of liberal humanism?
Reply
#16
No, communism isn't liberal. It was also far less destructive than liberalism, but that's another question.
Reply
#17
(10-05-2012, 02:50 PM)Crusading Philologist Wrote: No, communism isn't liberal. It was also far less destructive than liberalism, but that's another question.

Uhhh, what? So socialism isn't liberal, either? Dialectical materialism seeks to uproot the natural order and replace it with a materialist utopia. How is that not liberal?

Am I crazy, or does anyone else find CP's statement very strange and WRONG?
Reply
#18
(10-05-2012, 02:50 PM)Crusading Philologist Wrote: No, communism isn't liberal. It was also far less destructive than liberalism, but that's another question.

Lol
Reply
#19
I'm starting to wonder if CP is a communist. That would explain his love for authoritarian governments and hatred for private property.
Reply
#20
(10-05-2012, 02:50 PM)Crusading Philologist Wrote: No, communism isn't liberal. It was also far less destructive than liberalism, but that's another question.

How is this even possible. Isn't the count up to 100,000,000 people being slaughter in the name of communism over the last century ? Not only that, the Blessed Mother specifically mentioned communism by name, as something to be on guard about corrupting the entire world.

Liberals want to make us slaves to the state. They want to control every aspect of our lives under the guise of knowing better then us.They think that the government is the answer to everything. -How is that not part of the communist mentality?
Reply




Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)