The Individual, The Family, and Catholic Corporate Society - Dr. John Rao
#51
(10-13-2012, 07:08 PM)obscurus Wrote:
(10-13-2012, 02:53 PM)PeterII Wrote:
obscurus Wrote:The questions proposed in 1-5 are precisely the questions Archbishop Lefebvre asked. I think an application of the social teachings of the Church can help tremendously in the mess we find ourselves in at the present moment. What did the Popes know anyway? I don't think they are mere platitudes but reflect the crux of the problem with the political situation as judged according to Catholic principles. To dismss them as mere platitudes is actually rather horrifying. Is Quas Primas irrelevant?

Question 6: sure those may help but fundamentally men must change their hearts and minds and not put blind trust in economics divorced from morality. More later...

What are the teachings of the Church in regards to Keynesian economics, fiat money versus free money/gold standard, business cycle theory, austerity measures etc.?  You keep mentioning Church teaching, but aren't teaching us anything. 

And you keep dodging my questions.

Your questions are irrelevant because you are asking me personal questions about my Faith that have nothing to do with the argument.  I'm not a prelate.  If libertarian principles contradict Church teaching, you should be able to point that out without resorting to ad hominems. 
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#52
One cannot be atomistic nor an isolated individualist; anarchism and anarcho-libertarianism are utopian and contrary to Catholic notions of governanance and properly ordered-society.
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#53
(10-13-2012, 09:22 PM)Virgil the Roman Wrote: One cannot be atomistic nor an isolated individualist; anarchism and anarcho-libertarianism are utopian and contrary to Catholic notions of governanance and properly ordered-society.

Anarchists are against the coercive State, not against interaction with others.  But even so, how do hermits fit into your utopian vision of a properly ordered society?  Are you not condemning the desert fathers and other strict orders? 
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#54
Anarchism is utopian, chaotic, and a pie-in-the-sky mentality. It like Marxism deserves a classless society free of 'coercion and government'.  However, this unattainable as it ignores Original Sin and that man requires a governmental structure to ensure and enforce order, justice, peace, and true lawfulness. There is always going to be some sort of person that desires power and will utilise weapons, men, money, gold, to manipulate and dominate his fellow man. One cannot 'trust the market' alone to this. This in a way deifies the market, as if it could protect a man or be the end-all or be-all of an individual.  Anarchists offer no real solution other than they are free against 'coercion' and 'government'/'statism'.  Yet, such a society is unjust and unsustainable. Inevitably a tyranny or rule of some sort will rise. 

The question is: How bad do things have to bode before libertarians will admit that governance and a government is needed?
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