Full Prostration during mass?
#21
(10-16-2012, 02:09 AM)TS Aquinas Wrote:
(10-16-2012, 01:31 AM)Geremia Wrote:
(10-15-2012, 01:49 PM)The_Harlequin_King Wrote: The priest also extends his arms outward after the consecration in Sarum.
You mean cruciform at the Unde et memores? The Dominican rite does that, too.

Where did this tradition stem from? Premonstratensians (they still do it today) from where Dominicans branched from or the Sarum Rite?
I don't know.
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#22
(10-15-2012, 12:22 AM)DoktorDespot Wrote: Several weeks ago I was privileged to attend a mass in the Dominican Rite at the Dominican House of Studies in Washington D.C.

Aside from the usual customs particular to the Dominican mass, one thing in particular stood out to me. At the "Ecce Agnus Dei" before communion, some of the friars went into the nave and did a full prostration of the style I have only seen in ordinations. It was quite dramatic, they each had an arm extended out towards the altar and their face buried in the ground. Here is a picture (not my own) from the mass.
[Image: DSC00650_zps1f83658c.jpg]

I tried researching it, but I found nothing about this custom. Is it part of the Dominican rite? Has anyone seen anything like this or know the history/ significance of this gesture within the context of mass? I emailed the priest who celebrated the mass with this question, but have not received a response yet.

Thanks
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#23
OP, I'm so jealous that you got to attend this.  It was a historic day for sure.  Was anyone turned away because the chapel was full?
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#24
This web page might be useful.

http://dominican-liturgy.blogspot.sg/200...pular.html

The friars are making the "venia".

From the page above: the venia is made "By the communicants (not the ministers) at the recitation of the Confiteor before Communion in the Dominican Rite Solemn Mass up to 1959, when this Confiteor was dropped to conform to changes in the Roman Rite."

Hope that helps!
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#25
(10-16-2012, 05:08 AM)Walty Wrote: OP, I'm so jealous that you got to attend this.  It was a historic day for sure.  Was anyone turned away because the chapel was full?

Honestly, I was sitting in the choir stalls, so I couldn't really see the main public seating area that well. They had a large number of individual chairs (the type with the kneelers built in,) but there were also a ton of people standing. I would say that just about every bit of space was filled up. There was also a gallery of sorts overlooking the chapel that was also full.

All in all though it was an absolutely beautiful mass. It was a Missa Cantata, and the mass celebrated was the votive mass of the blessed sacrament. The celebrant Fr. Pius gave a very good homily on the real presence and explained some of the history of the Dominican rite.  Apparently this was the first Sung mass in the Dominican  rite publicly celebrated by an American priest outside of the Western province since 1969. I spoke to Father after the mass, and he said that they wanted to have more Dominican rite masses (on special feast days probably,) in the near future. Apparently they have been working pretty hard to learn the rite, so future ones should be easier on their part.
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#26
(10-16-2012, 11:44 AM)DoktorDespot Wrote:
(10-16-2012, 05:08 AM)Walty Wrote: OP, I'm so jealous that you got to attend this.  It was a historic day for sure.  Was anyone turned away because the chapel was full?

Honestly, I was sitting in the choir stalls, so I couldn't really see the main public seating area that well. They had a large number of individual chairs (the type with the kneelers built in,) but there were also a ton of people standing. I would say that just about every bit of space was filled up. There was also a gallery of sorts overlooking the chapel that was also full.

All in all though it was an absolutely beautiful mass. It was a Missa Cantata, and the mass celebrated was the votive mass of the blessed sacrament. The celebrant Fr. Pius gave a very good homily on the real presence and explained some of the history of the Dominican rite.  Apparently this was the first Sung mass in the Dominican  rite publicly celebrated by an American priest outside of the Western province since 1969. I spoke to Father after the mass, and he said that they wanted to have more Dominican rite masses (on special feast days probably,) in the near future. Apparently they have been working pretty hard to learn the rite, so future ones should be easier on their part.

Awesome.  It seems that some very good things are happening with the east coast Dominicans and the Dominican House of Studies specifically.
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#27
(10-16-2012, 05:08 AM)Walty Wrote: OP, I'm so jealous that you got to attend this.  It was a historic day for sure.  Was anyone turned away because the chapel was full?

I got to see a Dominican Rite Mass at St. Vincent Ferrer in Manhattan (last year I think), and that was pretty historic too.

You should be jealous of both of us  :P :grin:
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#28
This thread is very interesting, especially the comparisons being drawn between Sarum and Dominican rites.

Not much to add, but I want to follow updates and thank you for posting.
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#29
(10-16-2012, 11:49 AM)newyorkcatholic Wrote:
(10-16-2012, 05:08 AM)Walty Wrote: OP, I'm so jealous that you got to attend this.  It was a historic day for sure.  Was anyone turned away because the chapel was full?

I got to see a Dominican Rite Mass at St. Vincent Ferrer in Manhattan (last year I think), and that was pretty historic too.

You should be jealous of both of us  :P :grin:

I am!!  I didn't know that there had been an east coast Dominican Rite Mass said before this.  I guess this was the first one said in DC at the DHS and not the first on the east coast (since VII) in general.

Well that's even greater news!  I love the Dominicans very much.  My wife discerned with Dominicans.  I'm planning on besting St. Alice and sending my daughter off to the trad Dominican Sisters in New Zealand at age 6.  Haha.
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