Anglican Use Marriage
#1
What is going on here?
[Image: 547032_366165486805638_1649202043_n.jpg]
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#2
An immodestly dressed bride, a nice chasuble, the Sacrament of Holy Matrimony...

Pertaining to your question: in the Anglican Use Rite of Matrimony, as in the Traditional Rite of Matrimony, the priest binds the hands of the Husband and Bride with his stole immediately after their making their vows and whilst he recites the pronouncement of Matrimony (in the Traditional Latin Rite, "Ego conjugo vos in matrimonium, in nomine Patris, et Filii, et Spritius Sancti. Amen."
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#3
(10-25-2012, 12:06 PM)MRose Wrote: An immodestly dressed bride, a nice chasuble, the Sacrament of Holy Matrimony...

An ugly chasuble. What's the point of being Anglican Use if you're going to ape the bad taste of the 18th century on the Continent? Fiddlebacks have never been part of the so-called "Anglican patrimony". The most problematic part of the picture, though, is what appears to be a female chorister in a choir stall, wearing a red cassock and surplice. Am I mistaken?


As for the original question, CatholicLife, MRose has it right. This "handfasting" with the stole, which may possibly be a baptized carryover of the pagan practice of handfasting (as with rings), is part of an optional rubric in the Anglican Use's Book of Divine Worship. It's also arguably the reason we say "tying the knot" in reference to marriage.

There's no rubric for it in the traditional Roman Ritual, but it was certainly done as a matter of custom in the Middle Ages and, to a lesser degree, the Counter-Reformation up to the present. There's certainly no reason why a traditional Catholic couple getting married in the 1962 form couldn't request this.

The priest in this picture is making the mistake of tying the knot while wearing a chasuble instead of a cope. The chasuble must be bent aside in an awkward way for the priest to reach under and bring out his stole, while if he's wearing a cope, it's already open in the front. In the traditional Roman Ritual, the priest has the option of wearing a cope, but he doesn't put the chasuble on until the wedding rite is over because the Mass begins afterward. In the Novus Ordo, the rite of marriage take place in the middle of Mass. Perhaps this priest is using the Novus Ordo rite?
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#4
Here's the liturgical text now in use, supplanting the BDW:

http://usordinariate.org/documents/AC_Marriage_Rite.pdf
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#5
You can see the "handfasting" in this altarpiece by Rogier van der Weyden, in between the depictions of holy orders and extreme unction. It's from an altarpiece called "The Seven Sacraments", dated around 1450. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seven_Sacra...Altarpiece

[Image: Rogier_van_der_Weyden-_Seven_Sacraments_...t_wing.JPG]

Note the interesting use of red wedding garments for both bride and groom.
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#6
(10-25-2012, 05:57 PM)Parmandur Wrote: Here's the liturgical text now in use, supplanting the BDW:

http://usordinariate.org/documents/AC_Marriage_Rite.pdf

Thanks. I perused it quickly and see no significant differences between that and the BDW form of marriage, except that the opening exhortation is a bit longer since it uses more of the Cranmer language (the "firstly", "secondly", etc. reasons for marriage).

Also, there are still Anglican Use parishes that remain with their local dioceses. My own parish where I was baptized chose not to join the US Ordinariate after all, due to what I can only describe as a perception that the new Ordinary is "too Episcopalian".
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#7
(10-25-2012, 05:59 PM)The_Harlequin_King Wrote: You can see the "handfasting" in this altarpiece by Rogier van der Weyden, in between the depictions of holy orders and extreme unction. It's from an altarpiece called "The Seven Sacraments", dated around 1450. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Seven_Sacra...Altarpiece

[Image: Rogier_van_der_Weyden-_Seven_Sacraments_...t_wing.JPG]

Note the interesting use of red wedding garments for both bride and groom.

Beautiful altarpiece. I think the Byzantine Rite has some sort of ceremony with the priest's stole, which they associate with their different understanding of the sacrament: the priest is the minister, not the couple.
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#8
(10-25-2012, 06:18 PM)newyorkcatholic Wrote: Beautiful altarpiece. I think the Byzantine Rite has some sort of ceremony with the priest's stole, which they associate with their different understanding of the sacrament: the priest is the minister, not the couple.
True, the Byzantines understand the Sacrament of Matrimony to be conferred by the priest rather than the spouses. It is also called "Crowning" in the East.

(10-25-2012, 05:42 PM)The_Harlequin_King Wrote:
(10-25-2012, 12:06 PM)MRose Wrote: An immodestly dressed bride, a nice chasuble, the Sacrament of Holy Matrimony...

An ugly chasuble. What's the point of being Anglican Use if you're going to ape the bad taste of the 18th century on the Continent? Fiddlebacks have never been part of the so-called "Anglican patrimony". The most problematic part of the picture, though, is what appears to be a female chorister in a choir stall, wearing a red cassock and surplice. Am I mistaken?


As for the original question, CatholicLife, MRose has it right. This "handfasting" with the stole, which may possibly be a baptized carryover of the pagan practice of handfasting (as with rings), is part of an optional rubric in the Anglican Use's Book of Divine Worship. It's also arguably the reason we say "tying the knot" in reference to marriage.

There's no rubric for it in the traditional Roman Ritual, but it was certainly done as a matter of custom in the Middle Ages and, to a lesser degree, the Counter-Reformation up to the present. There's certainly no reason why a traditional Catholic couple getting married in the 1962 form couldn't request this.

The priest in this picture is making the mistake of tying the knot while wearing a chasuble instead of a cope. The chasuble must be bent aside in an awkward way for the priest to reach under and bring out his stole, while if he's wearing a cope, it's already open in the front. In the traditional Roman Ritual, the priest has the option of wearing a cope, but he doesn't put the chasuble on until the wedding rite is over because the Mass begins afterward. In the Novus Ordo, the rite of marriage take place in the middle of Mass. Perhaps this priest is using the Novus Ordo rite?
Okay okay, I cede my point on the chasuble. It is certainly not "Anglican Patrimony" at the very least. And as far as I can tell, that is most definitely a female in what appears to be a choir stall in cassock and surplice. Hrmmmm...

In the Anglican Use, does the Matrimony take place in the Traditional spot, prior to Holy Mass, or in the Novus Ordo spot?
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#9
(10-25-2012, 06:25 PM)MRose Wrote: In the Anglican Use, does the Matrimony take place in the Traditional spot, prior to Holy Mass, or in the Novus Ordo spot?

Good question. It takes place in the Novus Ordo spot after the Gospel and homily. However, the opening exhortation and passive assent to the marriage ("N., wilt thou have this Woman to thy wedded wife") are done at the beginning after the procession into the church. I've sung at a couple of Anglican Use weddings, and the practice I've seen is for the priest to wear the cope until the Offertory, where he changes into the chasuble. This is actually the practice I've known at high Masses at my parish of membership, even at ordinary high Masses on Sundays and feasts.
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#10
(10-25-2012, 06:32 PM)The_Harlequin_King Wrote:
(10-25-2012, 06:25 PM)MRose Wrote: In the Anglican Use, does the Matrimony take place in the Traditional spot, prior to Holy Mass, or in the Novus Ordo spot?

Good question. It takes place in the Novus Ordo spot after the Gospel and homily. However, the opening exhortation and passive assent to the marriage ("N., wilt thou have this Woman to thy wedded wife") are done at the beginning after the procession into the church. I've sung at a couple of Anglican Use weddings, and the practice I've seen is for the priest to wear the cope until the Offertory, where he changes into the chasuble. This is actually the practice I've known at high Masses at my parish of membership, even at ordinary high Masses on Sundays and feasts.

To clarify, the priest wears a cope for the Mass of the Catecumens? I thought copes were for blessings and processionals, and not for Mass, and that such is one of the problematic novelties of, for example, part of the Pian Holy Week?
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