The odd situation of 2 calenders in one rite
#1
Was there ever a similar situation in the history of the Western Church where we had 2 calenders for one rite? Its basically 2 active calenders for one rite, but one just hasn't had anything added since the 1960's. Take for instance Christ the King. We essentially celebrate it twice in the Roman rite. Heck, some folks are blessed with double name days because saints were moved to other days. The two are so radically different, how would you ever get that back into sync? Two very different universal calenders for two forms of the same rite. :scratchinghead:
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#2
Dear fellow INFJ and Pennsylvanian,

I embrace the traditional calendar and leave it to the Church to solve the problem (to the extent that this is a problem).

The Conciliar Church caused this problem.  Sometimes I think the upending of the calendar was done to prevent the use of as many traditional books as possible.  Many traditional books are organized around the liturgical year.

Just one example:  Divine Intimacy.  This book is based on the weeks of the liturgical year and its meditations for Sundays are based on the readings for the traditional Mass.

Another example:  The Liturgical Year, by Dom Prosper Gueranger.

Can you see how juggling the calendar served to wipe the slate clean, allowing the introduction of Novus Ordo commentaries, meditations, etc.? 

Therefore, the solution is to peacefully embrace the traditional calendar.  We can turn their machinations back against them, because now the traditional calendar insulates us from a great deal of poisonous literature.
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#3
Yeah, forget the NO calendar.  Who wants to have 25 weeks of ordinary time anyways?

More Catholic Discussion: http://thetradforum.com/

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#4
I know some Byzantine rite parishes (mostly Ukrainian and Russian) use the old Julian calendar, whereas most don't.  In each case, I'm not sure if this is a long-standing thing or a newer thing though.

EDIT: just doing some brief research, it appears to be a mix--some areas never adopted the Gregorian, some have switched back to the Julian more recently.
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#5
You can see them each as a kind of regional calendar. The matter will certainly need to be resolved. Note also that they aren't radically different. They are more similar than dissimilar. We know this when you actually look at the calendar of a rite like the Syro-Malakanar's, and it has a very different tradition. The temporal cycle is exactly the same. All the Sundays are calendrically the same, even if the names are slightly different (so-and-so Sunday of ordinary time). The major feast are mostly the same. Christ the King is an exception, and also some of the bishops move the holy days of obligation a few days. But it isn't like there isn't some relationship. There is. The new calendar has been stripped of a lot in a effort to increase the importance of the temporal cycle, delegate many saints' celebrations to local calendars, and to restore saints to their proper days. But I see it as too much, too denuded, and think that in the restoration of the Roman Missal, this too will be restored.
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#6
(10-27-2012, 02:28 AM)TeaGuyTom Wrote: Was there ever a similar situation in the history of the Western Church where we had 2 calenders for one rite? Its basically 2 active calenders for one rite, but one just hasn't had anything added since the 1960's. Take for instance Christ the King. We essentially celebrate it twice in the Roman rite. Heck, some folks are blessed with double name days because saints were moved to other days. The two are so radically different, how would you ever get that back into sync? Two very different universal calenders for two forms of the same rite. :scratchinghead:
Why accept the premise that the Novus Ordo and TLM are two forms of the same Roman Rite?
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#7
(10-27-2012, 10:45 AM)MRose Wrote:
(10-27-2012, 02:28 AM)TeaGuyTom Wrote: Was there ever a similar situation in the history of the Western Church where we had 2 calenders for one rite? Its basically 2 active calenders for one rite, but one just hasn't had anything added since the 1960's. Take for instance Christ the King. We essentially celebrate it twice in the Roman rite. Heck, some folks are blessed with double name days because saints were moved to other days. The two are so radically different, how would you ever get that back into sync? Two very different universal calenders for two forms of the same rite. :scratchinghead:
Why accept the premise that the Novus Ordo and TLM are two forms of the same Roman Rite?
Because the Pope is always infallible whenever He speaks.
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#8
(10-27-2012, 10:45 AM)MRose Wrote:
(10-27-2012, 02:28 AM)TeaGuyTom Wrote: Was there ever a similar situation in the history of the Western Church where we had 2 calenders for one rite? Its basically 2 active calenders for one rite, but one just hasn't had anything added since the 1960's. Take for instance Christ the King. We essentially celebrate it twice in the Roman rite. Heck, some folks are blessed with double name days because saints were moved to other days. The two are so radically different, how would you ever get that back into sync? Two very different universal calenders for two forms of the same rite. :scratchinghead:
Why accept the premise that the Novus Ordo and TLM are two forms of the same Roman Rite?
I only say it because the EF/OF confusion is popular among the reform of the reform people I talk to. Personally, I think of them as 2 separate rites. If the Ambrosian, Carmelite etc. are seperate rites, then the NO and TLM should REALLY be Pauline and Gregorian Rites.
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#9
Impy, didn't really think of all the books that were based around the traditional year. By the way, what happened to the singing owl?
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#10
(10-27-2012, 12:41 PM)TeaGuyTom Wrote: By the way, what happened to the singing owl?

I still love to sing-a.

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