A sin to get someone to go to Mass?
#1
My aunt hasn't been to Mass in at least 40 years, aside from weddings and funerals.  I don't think she'll start going again now (or ever) because she believes that her life is too busy and that God "understands."  She lives with her Protestant husband who doesn't practice, their daughter, and their daughter's two sons.  Her daughter wasn't raised in a religion, and neither were the grandsons; she divorced the father of her two sons (a non-practicing Catholic who married her in a public park with a justice of the peace), and the father died soon after the divorce.

Assuming that my aunt could be convinced to go to Mass again, would it be a sin upon anyone who convinced her if she went and received Communion, and she wouldn't go to Confession?  I can't think of a tactful way to ask someone to go to Confession after they've been away for so long, and even a lapsed Catholic's instinct at Mass is to receive Communion with or without Confession.
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#2
(11-06-2012, 04:59 PM)dark lancer Wrote: Assuming that my aunt could be convinced to go to Mass again, would it be a sin upon anyone who convinced her if she went and received Communion, and she wouldn't go to Confession?  I can't think of a tactful way to ask someone to go to Confession after they've been away for so long, and even a lapsed Catholic's instinct at Mass is to receive Communion with or without Confession.

It would not be a sin for a person other than one who received unworthily or one who otherwise supported that act.

So, if you expect her to know the teachings and what she has been doing, then you are not responsible for anything.

However, if you bring someone and misinform them or do not offer knowledge when it is needed, then you would be responsible in some fashion.

If Confessions are heard before Mass, I would, in inviting someone, point this out and say that is what I am going to do.

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#3
If she didn't get married inside the church to her Protestant "husband" with a dispensation from the bishop, to a marry a non-catholic, and to marry outside of the church, then she is in an invalid marriage and cannot receive communion anyway.
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#4
Also, if she thinks that not going to Mass is OK because "God understands", good luck convincing her that Confession is necessary. I'm sure "God understands" about her sins, too.
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#5
You are not responsible for the actions of others. One can only do so much, and the rest is up to the free will of the person.
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#6
(11-06-2012, 07:02 PM)Phillipus Iacobus Wrote: You are not responsible for the actions of others.

Well, not unless one participates in their actions: http://nonpeccabis.blogspot.com/2012/04/...thers.html

But yes, if one does what is good, one is not responsible for the evil others do.

Our Lord is not responsible for the evil done to Him, even though He knew it would happen. He did only what was only Good.
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#7
(11-06-2012, 05:33 PM)Rosarium Wrote: It would not be a sin for a person other than one who received unworthily or one who otherwise supported that act.

So, if you expect her to know the teachings and what she has been doing, then you are not responsible for anything.

However, if you bring someone and misinform them or do not offer knowledge when it is needed, then you would be responsible in some fashion.

If Confessions are heard before Mass, I would, in inviting someone, point this out and say that is what I am going to do.

Hear, hear; I echo Rosarium's post. Good luck with it! :pray:
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#8
But to keep quiet and allow a sacrilege to happen is also a sin... especially if it is within your power to do so, is it not?

(11-06-2012, 07:02 PM)Phillipus Iacobus Wrote: You are not responsible for the actions of others. One can only do so much, and the rest is up to the free will of the person.

Actually:

Quote: The 9 Ways We Participate in Others' Sins
By counsel
By command
By consent
By provocation
By praise or flattery
By concealment
By partaking
By silence
By defense of the ill done

Wouldn't this be "by silence"?
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#9
(11-06-2012, 08:33 PM)LoneWolfRadTrad Wrote: But to keep quiet and allow a sacrilege to happen is also a sin... especially if it is within your power to do so, is it not?

Indeed; I'd only counsel not inviting anyone to Mass if I know that person will insist on receiving or being sacrilegious in some other way. Otherwise, I'd find some polite and succinct way of bringing the matter up.

It was like that when my in-laws came to my wife's Confirmation a couple of years ago. He's a convert from Catholicism to Lutheranism, and asked about receiving Communion; I asked him not to, because he left the Church, so he can't take Communion unless he first goes to Confession. It ended well, and he didn't take the Eucharist, but I got the feeling my answer was disappointing, since he had years of low-church all-are-welcome-despite-the-biblical-injunction-against-receiving-communion-unworthily spiel in him, so assenting to the stuffy old Catholic ways probably was a little difficult, but I Templared up and told him the truth, knowing I had an obligation in the eyes of God to do so.

It was worth it, and it always is.
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#10
(11-06-2012, 08:33 PM)LoneWolfRadTrad Wrote: Wouldn't this be "by silence"?

Silence is only participation in certain circumstances, ie, when one should not have been silent.

From my blog post linked to earlier:

Quote:By Silence: Silence when one should have spoken out. This is especially important for those who have authority over others. This is in force when silence is directly complicit with the evil being done.

I forget the citations I used, but I think I did look that up. I am sure searching would yield more authoritative results.

Sins are not committed against us, but God, and we do not have to be vocal about condemning all sin we can witness to some extent.

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