Are there any notable Deaf traditional priests?
#1
So I'm learning ASL and I've been looking for reliable video guides for signing the standard prayers everyone should know, and I found this guy: http://www.frmd.org/  He doesn't seem to be a trad and he links to Medjugorje on his blog, and I'm not about to bother a priest I don't know out of the blue about the TLM.

So, I was wondering whether there were any known Deaf priests on the traditional perspective of things.  SSPX, FSSP, whatever.

Also are the deaf/Deaf allowed in TLM parishes?  I'm curious about how TLM interpretation works.  I guess there's a provision for an interpreter to assist a Deaf person in Confession as long as the interpreter never reveals sins outside of Confession.
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#2
(11-09-2012, 01:55 AM)dark lancer Wrote: Also are the deaf/Deaf allowed in TLM parishes?  I'm curious about how TLM interpretation works.  I guess there's a provision for an interpreter to assist a Deaf person in Confession as long as the interpreter never reveals sins outside of Confession.

I don't see why not. But an easier solution may be communicating by writing.
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#3
What use would an interpreter be at a TLM?  I think that befits a misunderstanding of the liturgy.  Or at least a mis-orientation.

Anyways, Boston, MA and Rockford, IL have large deaf ministries. 

Also, if you perhaps write to the deaf priests, they might be willing to make a video on Youtube for it.  They seem to be pretty down with technology.
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#4
(11-09-2012, 01:55 AM)dark lancer Wrote: Also are the deaf/Deaf allowed in TLM parishes? 
Huh, why not? Do you think deaf people were prohibited from attending Mass?

Also, the TLM is more inclusive than the NO. The NO relies heavily on listening to all the blah-blah that goes on. The TLM is a liturgy for all senses (incense, gestures).
A deaf person at a TLM has less disadvantage in comparison to a hearing, non Latin speaking person, than at a NO.
The only place where an interpreter would make sense is the homily.
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#5
(11-09-2012, 02:52 AM)Freudentaumel Wrote: The only place where an interpreter would make sense is the homily.

Yes, but in this case, it would probably be better for him to just request a transcript of the homily. Most priests and deacons I know deliver pre-written homilies.
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#6
(11-09-2012, 02:57 AM)The_Harlequin_King Wrote: Yes, but in this case, it would probably be better for him to just request a transcript of the homily. Most priests and deacons I know deliver pre-written homilies.

One notable exception to this is Archbishop Lefebvre, whom I heard would almost always preach off the cuff.
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#7
(11-09-2012, 02:52 AM)Freudentaumel Wrote:
(11-09-2012, 01:55 AM)dark lancer Wrote: Also are the deaf/Deaf allowed in TLM parishes? 
Huh, why not? Do you think deaf people were prohibited from attending Mass?

It was my understanding that noise is tolerated much less in the TLM than the NO--coughing during the TLM could summon the ushers, for instance.  My ASL teacher says that the Deaf can be unintentionally noisy.
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#8
Few things:  1) Our FSSP pastor has a friend who is a deaf priest in Wisconsin, but I don't believe that a deaf man can be a TLM priest.  I'll have to check on that.  2) Regarding Confession, our Confessional setup has an Ubi-Duo (basically back-to-back laptops to communicate with the deaf), so the penitent can type his Confession out, and Fr. can respond.  Prior to having one of those, my deaf brother-in-law would write his Confession on paper and slip it to the priest that way.  3) My wife and other brother-in-law interpret the English parts of the Mass each Sunday (announcements, Epistle, Gospel, homily).  Sometimes they have the homily in advance, sometimes not.  My brother-in-law also started interpreting the Sanctus, Credo, and Angus Dei while the choir is singing.  He eventually hopes to interpret the whole Mass in ASL, but it's quite a challenge.

Our pastor has taken several sign language courses at a local college, and he has become quite good at it.  He even signed his homily at a wedding he performed while my brother-in-law voiced it.  My wife is now offering a basic ASL class after Sunday Mass for parishioners and they are getting between 20-30 people attending each week.
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#9
Nothing against the deaf, but I'm surprised they let deaf men be priests. How can they say Mass, let alone sing it? Though I guess they are at advantage compared to the blind and the mute.

Jacob here is deaf. Perhaps he can answer some of your questions.

I agree that the only place where interpretation would make sense is the homily. Sight cannot replace sound, and we shouldn't try.
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#10
I heard of a blind NO priest who was pastor at an objectionable NO parish (round church with sloped seating and an altar in the middle, no tabernacle in sight, and a walk-in Baptismal font) I went to with the band in high school.
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