New Archbishop of Canturbury
#1
I seems that the Copts were not the only ones choosing a new "pope." The Anglicans are choosing a new archbishop of Canturbury.
:) :) :)

  http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-20242129
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#2
The Church of England continues to decline, though to be honest, I'd probably have said that no matter who got appointed to the post.

I met the previous Archbishop (or Archdruid, if you prefer) last December, shortly before Christmas. I was touring Canterbury Cathedral during their service of nine lessons and carols. The nine lessons is one of the few things originating from Anglicanism that I think the Catholic Church ought to adopt as a quasi-liturgical devotion. A few Catholic parishes, especially "Anglican Use" ones, already do. The structure does have some roots in Matins, anyway.
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#3
Who cares about this false sect set up by a murdering adulterer
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#4
(11-09-2012, 09:03 PM)salus Wrote: Who cares about this false sect set up by a murdering adulterer

Time for some Chesterton:

There is one historical human fact which now seems to me so plain and solid, that I think that even if I were to lose the Faith, I could not lose sight of the fact.  It has rather the character of a fact of chemistry or geology; though from another side it is mysterious enough, like many other manifest and unmistakable facts.  It is this: that at the moment when Religion lost touch with Rome, it changed instantly and internally, from top to bottom, in its very substance and the stuff of which it was made.  It changed in substance; it did not necessarily change in form or features or externals. It might do the same things; but it could not be the same thing. It might go on saying the same things; but it was not the same thing that was saying them.  At the very beginning, indeed, the situation was almost exactly like that.  Henry VIII was a Catholic in everything except that he was not a Catholic.  He observed everything down to the last bead and candle; he accepted everything down to the last deduction from a definition; he accepted everything except Rome. And in that instant of refusal, his religion became a different religion; a different sort of religion; a different sort of thing. In that instant it began to change; and it has not stopped changing yet. We are all somewhat wearily aware that some Modern Churchmen call such continuous change progress; as when we remark that a corpse crawling with worms has an increased vitality; or that a snow-man, slowly turning into a puddle, is purifying itself of its accretions. But I am not concerned with this argument here.  The point is that a dead man may look like a sleeping man a moment after he is dead; but decomposition has actually begun.  The point is that the snow-man may in theory be made in the real image of man.  Michelangelo made a statue in snow; and it might quite easily have been an exact replica of one of his statues in marble; but it was not in marble. Most probably the snow-man has begun to melt almost as soon as it is made.  But even if the frost holds, it is still a stuff capable of melting when the frost goes.  It seemed to many that Protestantism would long continue to be, in the popular phrase, a perfect frost. But that does not alter the difference between ice and marble; and marble does not melt.

    G.K. Chesterton
    The Well and the Shallows

(The text in red is not terribly relevant but it's one of my favorite statements of his.)
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#5
(11-09-2012, 04:52 AM)The_Harlequin_King Wrote: The Church of England continues to decline, though to be honest, I'd probably have said that no matter who got appointed to the post.

I met the previous Archbishop (or Archdruid, if you prefer) last December, shortly before Christmas. I was touring Canterbury Cathedral during their service of nine lessons and carols. The nine lessons is one of the few things originating from Anglicanism that I think the Catholic Church ought to adopt as a quasi-liturgical devotion. A few Catholic parishes, especially "Anglican Use" ones, already do. The structure does have some roots in Matins, anyway.

Did you kiss his ring?  Did you give him a pectoral cross?  Did you call him a brother in Christ?  Did you address him as Your Excellency?  Tell us everything, omitting nothing.
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#6
(11-09-2012, 10:00 PM)DrBombay Wrote: Did you kiss his ring?  Did you give him a pectoral cross?  Did you call him a brother in Christ?  Did you address him as Your Excellency?  Tell us everything, omitting nothing.

Hahaha....

Well, he was greeting everyone who was exiting the cathedral through the west end. I shook his hand, told him I was a pilgrim to Canterbury (which was true, even though it was a very leisurely pilgrimage via train), and asked him if he could get someone to show me the spot where the shrine of Saint Thomas Becket formerly stood. He secured me a tour guide quite promptly, even though the cathedral was going to close for the night in about 15 minutes. I addressed him as "your grace" since, regardless of his orders, he has a seat in the House of Lords, so he is basically a duke. I decided that if I would see him again, though, I'd probably just call him Dr. Williams. I hadn't expected to actually run into him until it happened.

As you can see in this photo op, it was all so sudden that I look like a deer caught in headlights. I have to give Williams credit, though, that he has the most regal voice and bearing of any cleric or pretend cleric I've ever met.


(11-09-2012, 09:03 PM)salus Wrote: Who cares about this false sect set up by a murdering adulterer

It matters insofar as they ought to be taking good care of our churches until we can take them back: not only Canterbury Cathedral, but Westminster Abbey, Saint George's Chapel, and pretty much all the other English churches built before the Reformation.
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#7
Is not Her Majesty the head of the Church?

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#8
(11-09-2012, 10:38 PM)UnamSanctam Wrote: Is not Her Majesty the head of the Church?

Supreme Governor from Elizabeth I onward. The role is nebulous. The Archbishop of Canterbury is the head of the Anglican Communion outside of England, though.
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#9
[Image: archanimal.jpg]

Hee Hee
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#10
(11-09-2012, 10:46 PM)The_Harlequin_King Wrote:
(11-09-2012, 10:38 PM)UnamSanctam Wrote: Is not Her Majesty the head of the Church?

Supreme Governor from Elizabeth I onward. The role is nebulous.

How true, since in modern practice it means that decisions, including the appointment of Bishops, are taken by the governing Prime Minister, because Her Majesty cannot act except on Ministerial Advice.
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