Psychiatric Drugs: Prescription for Madness
#1
Psychiatric drugs: Prescription for madness The Associated Press reported that a newly released study by Dr. William Cooper of Vanderbilt Children’s Hospital found that two and half million children in the U.S. are being prescribed antipsychotics annually. That’s 40 out of every 1,000 children are being exposed to highly toxic drugs that have never been approved for use in children. The drugs damage the central nervous system, the metabolic system, trigger hyperglycemia, acute weight gain, diabetes, cardiac arrest, cognitive impairment, and are linked to insulin suppression in children. The drugs carry black box warnings—but that does not seem to deter psychiatry from prescribing these drugs anyway.
Regulators’ approval of ever more toxic drugs and drug patches—without regard for the long-term consequences the drugs are likely to cause—has resulted in catastrophic drug-induced harm.
The review found almost 1,000 reports of psychosis or mania possibly linked to the drugs—which included Adderall, Concerta, Ritalin and Strattera—from Jan. 1, 2000, through June 30, 2005. The reports were pulled from the FDA’s database and from the drug companies themselves. Executive Summaries of the reports submitted by FDA medical safety officers of their analysis of adverse event reports in clinical trials and in post-marketing reports follow the AP report about the abusive prescribing of antipsychotic drugs for children.
"The most important finding of this review is that signs and symptoms of psychosis or mania, particularly hallucinations, can occur in some patients with no identifiable risk factors, at usual doses of any of the drugs currently used to treat ADHD."
"A substantial proportion of psychosis-related cases were reported to occur in children age ten years or less, a population in which hallucinations are not common. The occurrence of such symptoms in young children may be particularly traumatic and undesirable, both to the child and the parents. The predominance in young children of hallucinations, both visual and tactile, involving insects, snakes and worms is striking, and deserves further evaluation. Positive rechallenge (i.e., recurrence of symptoms when drug is re-introduced) is considered a hallmark for causality assessment of adverse events. Cases of psychosis related events which included a positive rechallenge were identified in this review for each of the drugs included in this analysis."
The astounding evidence provided for the first time to an FDA Advisory Committee underscores the fact that ADHD is both a gateway to prescribed psychoactive drugs, but also a gateway for major mental illness induced by those very drugs.
The evidence also appears to support our observation that the underlying cause that has led a US. diagnostic aberration­ "the Bipolar Child"—(not witnessed anywhere else in the world) is an effect of the drugs millions of children are being prescribed recklessly. Amphetamines and psychostimulants, SSRI antidepressants, and the most toxic of all the psychoactive drugs, antipsychotics, all may induce mania, psychosis, hostility, aggression, suicidal and homicidal behavior. ~From the Alliance for Human Research Protection, www.ahrp.org
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#2
I'm sorry, but I think this article is just cruel (not you, Gladius :) ).  Unless you have a child with these disorders, you have no idea what it's like.  Bipolar often went undiagnosed or misdiagnosed in the past, and research has shown that most bipolar adults have shown symptoms of the disorder since they were quite young. 
 
Quote:The evidence also appears to support our observation that the underlying cause that has led a US. diagnostic aberration­ "the Bipolar Child"—(not witnessed anywhere else in the world)
 
This is not true.  Bipolar, schizophrenia is universally recognized, in all ages, in all countries, although for schizophrenia adult onset is much more common.  The same c--- is spread about autism- that it is only a Western disease, that it's because of the vaccinations [Image: blah.gif].  There is no scientific evidence to back these things up...just antidotal evidence.
 
I've talked to parents with bipolar or schiophrenic children, and I babysat a bipolar child...and it was a heartbreaking road to come to the diagnosis that lead to many misdiagnoses, dead ends and cruel comments on what a bad parent they were, how the child "just needed a little more discipline", etc.  Not one of the parents I've talked to had the children on any psychtropic medication before, and most did not come to the decision lightly if that was the road they chose.  You can't "wish" bipolar or schizophernia away, nor therapy it away. 
 
Have you ever seen a nine year old- unmedicated, untreated, no history of psychotropic medicine- put a knife to his throat and threaten to kill himself?
 
I would GLADLY accept the side effects of a medicine that could give me my daughter (autism) back.  Depakote, a bipolar drug, has shown some promise in treating autism (not surprising, since there is a genetic link between bipolar and autism; a child is more likely to be autistic if the parent is bipolar or schizophernic), and it has some pretty strong side effects; potential infertility, diabetes, etc.  But compared to having a child who will most likely never be able to function or communicate normally- I'd take the risk, and I'm sure that's what many of these parents are doing.
 
Off the label uses are very common for most drugs.  Antihistimines are used to treat stomach problems, atypical antipsychotics are used successfully to treat mania and treatment resistant depression, antidepressants help with chronic pain disorders because they allow for deeper sleep at night which has been shown to be highly important. 
 
Sorry *wiping tears*.  This is an emotional issue for me, for several reasons.  And I agree there certainly needs to be better research into pharmacological treatments for these disorders in children.  But what do we do until then?  Despite the claims of quacks like Mercola, et al, not everything can be treated with herbs and nutrition.
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#3
I really appreciate the "contrary input", f.v.t., as I was not putting this forth as "gospel truth" (which you plainly realize) - but trying to spark a little interest in the topic.
 
I imagine the other people on the forum who have dealt with such children (and/or adults) will also be happy for the chance to discuss the issue with those who know something from experience, and maybe share some info learned elsewhere.
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#4
I can't imagine how reading this kind of stuff might make you feel. Even if you do find out that vaccines are bad, psychotropic medicines are bad, or whatever, what can that do for you now?

I used to help care for an autistic child, and I know how difficult it is. My heart goes out to you.  [Image: awww.gif]

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#5
I do not want to start a quarrel, but my experience with a loved one who has a mental illness mirrors the article that Eamon posted. My loved one is not a child, but my husband. He has bi-polar disorder and has been on many different drugs since his diagnosis. The worst one was zyprexa. It almost killed him. He gained about 60 pounds in a very short period of time and his triglyceride levels went through the roof. His regular doctor (a D.O., like Mercola) consulted with the psychiatrist and they changed his meds to something else (several times, in fact). There might not be a combination available that will control the bi-polar symptoms and the accompanying anxiety.
 
The sad fact is that many of these drugs have life-threatening side effects and the patient is not warned about them. Here's a warning: if you or your loved one has to get blood tests during treatment, it is to check for damage from side effects of the drug that is supposed to make the patient all better. It is gross negligence to hold out a ray of hope to a patient/family when that ray is likely to cause an even more serious medical problem, such a diabetes, a common side effect of psychiatric drugs which really don't work all that well. As I said, my dh has been on several over the last few years trying to find the magic combination. The ones that have helped the most have the worst side effects and have had to be discontinued to protect his health/life. When face with drug treatment options, one has to be ready to ask the hard questions. Is the cure going to be worse than the condition?
 
I see no problem with looking into alternative methods of treating any chronic problems. However, that doesn't necessarily mean abandoning conventional treatment. I do not think that the two are mutually exclusive. Even the main stream psychiatrists are beginning to look at the studies of the benefits of fish oil on depression and his psychiatrist (an M.D.) suggested it. I think it's great. Even if it doesn't help his mental illness, it is still great for his heart- a fact that was first discovered by alternative health researchers. [Image: heartsmiley.gif] 
 
 
 
 
 
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#6
AdoramusTeChriste Wrote:I do not want to start a quarrel, but my experience with a loved one who has a mental illness mirrors the article that Eamon posted. My loved one is not a child, but my husband. He has bi-polar disorder and has been on many different drugs since his diagnosis. The worst one was zyprexa. It almost killed him. He gained about 60 pounds in a very short period of time and his triglyceride levels went through the roof. His regular doctor (a D.O., like Mercola) consulted with the psychiatrist and they changed his meds to something else (several times, in fact). There might not be a combination available that will control the bi-polar symptoms and the accompanying anxiety.
 
Zyprexa has a great many side effects, and it's supposed to be a "last resort" drug.  It also takes an average of 3 months for most drugs to fully work- most patients and often doctors don't wait that long.
 
And drugs alone will not control the symptoms of many of these diseases- that is a given.  Nor more then insulin or gulcaphoge alone will control the symptoms of diabetes.  There are other changes that have to be made.  The patient also has to be meds compliant, which is often a problem- as soon as they start feeling better, they stop taking the drugs or forget them frequently.
 
Quote:The sad fact is that many of these drugs have life-threatening side effects and the patient is not warned about them. Here's a warning: if you or your loved one has to get blood tests during treatment, it is to check for damage from side effects of the drug that is supposed to make the patient all better. It is gross negligence to hold out a ray of hope to a patient/family when that ray is likely to cause an even more serious medical problem, such a diabetes, a common side effect of psychiatric drugs which really don't work all that well.
 
There are several blanket statements in there.  Not all doctors do not discuss the side effects with their patients.  Any doctor who said the drug would make the patient "all better" all on its own is wrong, and most usually stress the need for therapy as well as lifestyle changes as well as management for the fact that there still will be episodes.  Often less frequent, and milder, but still.
The other thing is that they don't work all that well.  The number one difference between those who die because of bipolar (which has a 15% suicide rate) and those who don't is medication complicancy.   I don't know that I would necessarily make the statement that diabetes is a worse disease then some of these more serious mental health disorders. 
 
Quote: As I said, my dh has been on several over the last few years trying to find the magic combination. The ones that have helped the most have the worst side effects and have had to be discontinued to protect his health/life. When face with drug treatment options, one has to be ready to ask the hard questions. Is the cure going to be worse than the condition?
 
This is true; it is a risk/benefit analysis.  Anything is. There are no easy answers when someone has one of these diseases.  We're not talking the common cold here, or a little anxiety (as I'm sure you know, living with someone with BP)
 
To totally get the issue off mental illness for an example, my mom has PPH (primary pulmonary hypertension).  She also has several other diseases of earlier onset (fibromyalgia and rhumatoid arthritis) It took her two years after symptoms onset for diagnosis- the lifespan is usually 3-4 years.  The only way to extend it beyond that is a heart/lung transplant, which  gives you about an additional 5-7 years, usually. 
 
She had a doctor who was willing to experiement with various drugs with her, including higher then normal doses of typical heart medication.  She probably takes 20-25 pills a day.  She got irritable bowel and hair loss from a regime of treatment with steroids, which they took her off when the side effects got too bad.  She had an episode of kidney problems as a side effect of one of the drugs she took for the RA. She takes medicine to counter the side effects of the medicine.  But she was told she wouldn't live to see me graduate from junior high school, and now she's held her 3rd grandchild and is functioning remarkably well.  She was even able to go to college for a couple of terms.
 
Quote:I see no problem with looking into alternative methods of treating any chronic problems. However, that doesn't necessarily mean abandoning conventional treatment. I do not think that the two are mutually exclusive. Even the main stream psychiatrists are beginning to look at the studies of the benefits of fish oil on depression and his psychiatrist (an M.D.) suggested it. I think it's great. Even if it doesn't help his mental illness, it is still great for his heart- a fact that was first discovered by alternative health researchers. [Image: heartsmiley.gif]
 
I have several problems with alternative health methods, none of which necessarily have to do with the methods themselves. 
 
1.  They are treated as if they're perfectly safe: not true.  Vitamins, herbs, homeopathy are drugs- after all, asprin is manufactured from willow bark.  People have died from strokes and blood clots on St. John's Wort, for example, but because the industry is largely unregulated, you don't hear about it. Children have died from chelaton therapy, something used to "detoxify" the system. Vitamin A doses that are in a normal multivitamin is a catagory X drug for pregnancy.  Natural does not equal perfectly safe.
 
2.  Most (not all) people who look into natural medicine have the idea drugs=bad, natural=good.  Mercola is a prime example of this.  The idea every single treatment doctors offer you is somehow poison is ridiculous.
 
3.  Most natural remedies are not as effective as their phamacolgical counterpoints. Again, because the industry is largely unregulated, there is very little evidence to support most of their claims, except antidotal. 
 
4. (My personal experience) Most people who look into these treatments treat everyone who doesn't quite buy them as a stupid idiot for going a different route.  You wouldn't believe the number of comments I have got on my daughter's autism being my fault because she was vaccinized (when actually she wasn't until symptoms were quite prevelant-you could see symptoms in her case from birth) and not putting her on this totally expensive unproven diet to "cure her".  You wouldn't believe how many people tell my mom to quit all her medicine and go on a herbal regime.  With some of my health issues, despite my having tried several natural treatments, I'm always told it's not enough.  The knife on this issue cuts both ways. 

I do think that alternative methods don't exclude medicine, and vise versa.  I also think that most chronic health conditions, mental or physical, cannot be treated by meds alone.  What bothers me is the demonization of medicine.
 
As an aside, Kathy, have you looked into this: http://www.bipolarworld.net/Bipolar%20News/lithoro.htm.  I've heard great things about it. 
 
 
 
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#7
fiatvoluntastua Wrote: 
Zyprexa has a great many side effects, and it's supposed to be a "last resort" drug.  It also takes an average of 3 months for most drugs to fully work- most patients and often doctors don't wait that long. 
 
And drugs alone will not control the symptoms of many of these diseases- that is a given.  Nor more then insulin or gulcaphoge alone will control the symptoms of diabetes.  There are other changes that have to be made.  The patient also has to be meds compliant, which is often a problem- as soon as they start feeling better, they stop taking the drugs or forget them frequently.
 
My husband is very med compliant and he was on the drug for well over 3 months. You are really jumping to conclusions about personal facts. Further, zyprexa has more than a great many side effects; it has serious side effects. You can read about them here and here.
 
I am not going to quarrel about the rest of your observations. I already stated that I think that the two approaches to medicine are not mutually exclusive. I have always had good (not perfect) results by asking questions and gaining as much information as possible. The screw ups that we as a family have had to deal with have been through allopathic (traditional) care rather than alternative treatments. If your experience is different, fine. My experiences do not invalidate yours, and yours do not invalidate mine.
 
fiatvoluntastua Wrote: 
As an aside, Kathy, have you looked into this: http://www.bipolarworld.net/Bipolar%20News/lithoro.htm.  I've heard great things about it. 
[/url] 

 
Thank you very much for the link. [Image: smile.gif]
 
My husband has been on lithium and had to discontinue it because of an allergic reaction. It didn't help his symptoms anyway. Lithium treatment requires careful monitoring to avoid toxicity, and I hope that the project researchers are very careful. Lithium Orotate does look like an interesting alternative treatment, though.
 
 
[url=http://www.the-zyprexa-lawyer.com/]
 
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#8
AdoramusTeChriste Wrote:
My husband is very med compliant and he was on the drug for well over 3 months. You are really jumping to conclusions about personal facts. Further, zyprexa has more than a great many side effects; it has serious side effects. You can read about them here and here.

Meant to clarify: wasn't speaking about your husband, just bipolar treatment in general; they have issues with being meds compliant, and doctors are sometimes very eager to have something "work" quickly when you have a patient in crisis.  Also, what I meant by a great many side effects was serious side effects, which I had thought was clarified when I said it was one of the last resort drugs.   I personally would never ever take it. I didn't mean anything personal or offensive. [Image: truce.gif]
 
Quote:I am not going to quarrel about the rest of your observations. I already stated that I think that the two approaches to medicine are not mutually exclusive. I have always had good (not perfect) results by asking questions and gaining as much information as possible.
 
The underlined attitude is more what I am talking about, and one of the many reasons I have a distrust of natural medicine.  Those who choose to use "mainstream" medicine mostly or exclusively are seen as trusting dopes who just go along with their doctor.  It is because I have asked questions and gained as much information as possible that I just don't see a lot of merit behind "natural" remedies.  I realize people disagree with me...not a big deal.  What I do hate is the attitude that I must be uninformed or I would not choose to go a more mainstream route.
 
 
 
 
[url=http://www.the-zyprexa-lawyer.com/][/url] 
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#9
As someone who has worked in for a healthcare insurance agency, I was often apalled at how doctors have just thrown pills at patients haphazardly, and how symptoms have worsened or new symptoms have cropped up, just to be treated with another pill.  Nowhere is this more apparent than in childhood psychiatry.  The stories on treatment plans about what these kids go through were often heartbreaking (I'm glad I don't work there anymore).
 
I use both alternative medicines and modern medicine for my various minor health issues.  But if I were to simply follow the instructions of my doctor, I would be on 10 different medications right now, instead of just 2.  What is so sad is that people can no longer rely on their doctors, that they have to educate themselves.  What about the elderly?  The mentally incompetent?  Those who will comply with whatever minor suggestion from their doctor just because they are eager to get well and follow the Dr.'s advice?
 
I don't assume that people don't educate themselves about modern medicine, but I know for a fact that people who don't do so tend to overmedicate due to the skewed advice of their doctors who have been wined and dined by the pharmaceutical companies.
 
Sara's daughter is very very lucky to have a Mom who has the patience and concern to educate herself on the medicines and treatments.  But most children do not have that benefit, and it angers me that doctors don't fill the roles that they should.  What's worse, alot of the issues are simply due to poor parenting, and when one doctor won't medicate the child into quiet apathy, the parents will shop around until they find a doctor that will.
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#10
fiatvoluntastua Wrote:
AdoramusTeChriste Wrote:I am not going to quarrel about the rest of your observations. I already stated that I think that the two approaches to medicine are not mutually exclusive. I have always had good (not perfect) results by asking questions and gaining as much information as possible.
 
The underlined attitude is more what I am talking about, and one of the many reasons I have a distrust of natural medicine.  Those who choose to use "mainstream" medicine mostly or exclusively are seen as trusting dopes who just go along with their doctor.  It is because I have asked questions and gained as much information as possible that I just don't see a lot of merit behind "natural" remedies.  I realize people disagree with me...not a big deal.  What I do hate is the attitude that I must be uninformed or I would not choose to go a more mainstream route.
 
 
[url=http://www.the-zyprexa-lawyer.com/][/url] 

I didn't mean to imply that I think you are somehow uninformed. [Image: truce.gif] I am sorry if my post offended you.
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