Antihistamines
#11
(11-18-2012, 08:20 PM)per_passionem_eius Wrote:
(11-18-2012, 08:01 PM)DrBombay Wrote: Because of all the meth labs in my city, you now have to ask the pharmacist for an antihistamine.  The condoms and various lubricants and jellies can be bought freely by anyone of any age but the antihistamines are kept locked away like they're a threat to the public good.  There's a lesson there about the degeneracy of American society. Yes indeed.

So would you need a prescription for antihistamines, or do you just have to ask for them from behind the counter?  I doubt I would've gone to the trouble of going to a doctor for a prescription for this.  Now that I know how well they help I will in the future, if necessary.  I've never heard of any local drug labs in my life, not that I'm any expert.  Maybe we import our meth, I have no idea.

There's a really sad video on youtube showing pictures of women before and after becoming addicted to crystal meth.  The neighborhood I live in is just saturated with all kinds of this stuff, from the looks of many of the ladies here. 

In Indiana we have to show valid State Id and all that gets sucked into a database. Buy too much, Drug Task Force will come and knock in your doors and legally steal all your possessions. Every once in awhile a soccer mom or grand ma will get taken down;  having too many sick people at home is legally no excuse! Gotta get tough on drugs, u know!  :readrules:

Most pharmacies now requires a paper prescription to buy the over-the-counter product that is safely locked up behind the counter and the looks I get for being a white male --- might as ask for some crack.

I had a valid prescription for an AMA defined illness, and CVS was nice enough to inform me that I would have to wait until Tuesday morning, when I had to call and verify the decongestants arrived and I would be told what time and when to show up to get in line. Depending on the number in line the drug would be rationed. --- I politely told them FORGET IT.
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#12
(11-18-2012, 09:56 PM)Lateran15 Wrote: I had a valid prescription for an AMA defined illness, and CVS was nice enough to inform me that I would have to wait until Tuesday morning, when I had to call and verify the decongestants arrived and I would be told what time and when to show up to get in line. Depending on the number in line the drug would be rationed. --- I politely told them FORGET IT.

That's awful.  What did you do instead?
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#13
(11-18-2012, 10:00 PM)per_passionem_eius Wrote:
(11-18-2012, 09:56 PM)Lateran15 Wrote: I had a valid prescription for an AMA defined illness, and CVS was nice enough to inform me that I would have to wait until Tuesday morning, when I had to call and verify the decongestants arrived and I would be told what time and when to show up to get in line. Depending on the number in line the drug would be rationed. --- I politely told them FORGET IT.

That's awful.  What did you do instead?

Nothing. I gave up. Although I should say that I have prescriptions for three different nose sprays and a pill for the seasonal allergies. I am allergic to most pollen, animal dander (especially cows!). and all the assorted stuff.
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#14
(11-18-2012, 10:16 PM)Lateran15 Wrote: Nothing. I gave up. Although I should say that I have prescriptions for three different nose sprays and a pill for the seasonal allergies. I am allergic to most pollen, animal dander (especially cows!). and all the assorted stuff.

So you buy something without a prescription now, do you?  Have you tried Stinging Nettle?
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#15
(11-18-2012, 10:24 PM)per_passionem_eius Wrote:
(11-18-2012, 10:16 PM)Lateran15 Wrote: Nothing. I gave up. Although I should say that I have prescriptions for three different nose sprays and a pill for the seasonal allergies. I am allergic to most pollen, animal dander (especially cows!). and all the assorted stuff.

So you buy something without a prescription now, do you?  Have you tried Stinging Nettle?

I haven't tried anything homeopathic and with my current money intake, I'd have to grow it myself.
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#16
I think there is some confusion in this thread regarding drug categories.  Antihistamines do just that, work to suppress the histamine reaction.  These drugs normally have side effects that include drowsiness.  Benadryl (diphenhydramine) is a classic anthishistamine, and has significant CNS depressive effects.  Another class of drugs for allergies includes the decongestants.  These drugs open the breathing passages; they are vasodilators.  The ones to which people are referring in this thread (with respect to needing a prescription) are ephedrine or pseudoephedrine.  These are CNS stimulants, and can easily be converted into the even more powerful stimulant methamphetamine with some simple chemical processes.  That is why they are regulated as they are.  Personally, I don't take anything since as a toxicologist I know what these drugs (all drugs) can do to the body.  It's unnatural. 

For allergies, more natural treatments include a sinus wash, using hot peppers (capsaicin), and eating local honey (which give the body a low dose of allergins, somewhat like how a vaccination works).  The classic antihistamines are closely related to antidepressant type drugs and can have effects on one's mental or emotional state.  I don't recommend them.  The stimulants tend to have less mental effects in the sense of changing one's thought patterns, but still are problematic.  There is the risk of cardiovascular effects with these as well. 
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#17
(11-19-2012, 09:53 AM)Anthem Wrote:   These drugs open the breathing passages; they are vasodilators.  The ones to which people are referring in this thread (with respect to needing a prescription) are ephedrine or pseudoephedrine. 

Actually they are vasoconstrictors.

Norepinepherine receptors are stimulated by the psudoepederine or ephederine found in the decongestants which causes an epinephrine-like effect, producing increased heart rate, vasoconstriction and increased blood pressure. It also drys the mucus membranes in this manner, by decreasing blood flow to the peripheral circulation.

I'm no toxicologist, but I did work in an ER for 40 years. I may have even slept at a few Holiday Inns in my time too.  :LOL:
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#18
(11-19-2012, 10:34 AM)Zedta Wrote:
(11-19-2012, 09:53 AM)Anthem Wrote:   These drugs open the breathing passages; they are vasodilators.  The ones to which people are referring in this thread (with respect to needing a prescription) are ephedrine or pseudoephedrine. 

Actually they are vasoconstrictors.

Norepinepherine receptors are stimulated by the psudoepederine or ephederine found in the decongestants which causes an epinephrine-like effect, producing increased heart rate, vasoconstriction and increased blood pressure. It also drys the mucus membranes in this manner, by decreasing blood flow to the peripheral circulation.

I'm no toxicologist, but I did work in an ER for 40 years. I may have even slept at a few Holiday Inns in my time too.  :LOL:

Sorry, I did use the wrong word as I was quickly typing.  I meant "bronchodilator"
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#19
(11-18-2012, 08:25 PM)per_passionem_eius Wrote: Nice to 'see' you again, Axona! 
:)
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#20
(11-19-2012, 11:05 AM)Anthem Wrote:
(11-19-2012, 10:34 AM)Zedta Wrote:
(11-19-2012, 09:53 AM)Anthem Wrote:   These drugs open the breathing passages; they are vasodilators.  The ones to which people are referring in this thread (with respect to needing a prescription) are ephedrine or pseudoephedrine. 

Actually they are vasoconstrictors.

Norepinepherine receptors are stimulated by the psudoepederine or ephederine found in the decongestants which causes an epinephrine-like effect, producing increased heart rate, vasoconstriction and increased blood pressure. It also drys the mucus membranes in this manner, by decreasing blood flow to the peripheral circulation.

I'm no toxicologist, but I did work in an ER for 40 years. I may have even slept at a few Holiday Inns in my time too.  :LOL:

Sorry, I did use the wrong word as I was quickly typing.  I meant "bronchodilator"

Actually they are, in a 'back door' kinda way, since they stimulate the Beta 1 and Beta 2 and also the Alpha sites. They hit everything, but they are best at the alpha, hence the constriction of mostly the capillary beds and diminished mucus secretions in the mucus membranes and the other, side-effects, like increased BP, Pulse and sometimes Ventilation rate as well.
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