November 20th
#1
Today, November 20th, marks the anniversary of the deaths of two great architects of Spanish civilization in the 20th Century, Jose Antonio Primo de Rivera, 1st Duke of Primo de Rivera and 3rd Marquis of Estella, founder of the Falange Española, and Francisco Franco y Bahamonde, Caudillo and liberator of Spain for the Catholic Faith and against the communists.

[Image: falange-franco-primo2.jpg]

If you can find your way to do so, please say a rosary for the souls of these great heroes of the Catholic world.
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#2
It's also the Feast day of St Edmund of East Anglia my confirmation name.
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#3
Thank you for this reminder. Franco!
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#4
I do not agree with what everything the man did, but, after his death, most remnants of Spanish Catholic culture, including the Church's influence in Spanish society, collapsed.

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#5
(11-20-2012, 09:23 PM)Phillipus Iacobus Wrote: I do not agree with what everything the man did, but, after his death, most remnants of Spanish Catholic culture, including the Church's influence in Spanish society, collapsed.


The same can also be said with Franco's counterpart in Portugal, Antonio Salazar. 

[Image: Antonio_Salazar.jpg]

Then again, the Catholic Church and hierarchy in both respective countries became immensely liberal and modernistic  in the 1960s. Because of this, it is truly no surprise that  Church influence in Spain and Portugal greatly declined.

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#6
Yeah, and what happened in a few years is incredible.

Spain was essentially one of the last Catholic theocracies on Earth. Divorce, pornography, abortion, even adultery, were all illegal. There was not religious liberty until Dignitatis Humanae. For a state to have, at least on paper, such a Catholic society in the 1970s is mind boggling.

Almost immediately after Franco died, all of this went tumbling down. Socialists took power, and now, like most of post-Christian Europe (France, Italy, etc.) Spain is almost unrecognizable. Secularism and atheism reign supreme.

I'll admit that a lot of these right wing governments cared more about being right wing and maintaining military power rather than being Catholic, but all of that is now gone.
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#7
God have mercy upon the souls of Regent Francisco Bahamonde Franco and Chief of State Salazar of Portugal! May these servants of God rest in peace. :pray:
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#8
May their souls and the souls of all the faithful departed rest in peace. Amen
:pray: :pray: :pray:
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#9
If I'm not mistaken, Primo de Rivera is part of the political inspiration of Fidel Castro.
???
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#10
Franco was closer to a Carlist or Monarchist than actual Falangist; although, he utilised both factions to his advantage, whenever the need arose. He merely encorporated under the banner of the 'Falange': Monarchist, Carlist, Nationalist, Right-Wingers, the Military, Conservatives, Catholics, Reactionaries, and folks generally on the Right who opposed the Socialist/Marxist/Communist/Anarchist/Leftist/Liberal/Anti-Catholic Progressives/Spanish Bolsheviks.
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