Amalgam Fillings & Mercury
#1
Does anyone know if having these fillings replaced with porcelain, really improves one's well being. My 40 year old Autistic sister tested positive to Mercury; and since she has a number of fillings, which I believe affects her disposition, I'm thinking of having them replaced. Any opinions?
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#2
I recall hearing not to long ago that the mercury did not pose a significant threat; however, I heard it in passing and didn't pay too much attention at time so I can way off here.
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#3
From mercola.com
 
 
Learn How Mercury Is Affecting You and the Ones You Love
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#4
Well, if you're worried about small amounts of mercury, you'd better not eat any fish as fish nowadays contain not only mercury (especially swordfish, making them unhealthy to eat on a regular basis), but PCBs.

My dentist has been replacing all the silver fillings I've got, just because they've been wearing down and he feels that porcelin is not only quicker, but more effective.



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#5
If you decide to have them replaced, try to find a dentist who agrees with you (yes, they do exist). The dentists who are gladly replacing fillings to avoid mercury exposure will remove the old ones carefully. Dentists who don't believe in the dangers of mercury - even though they are required by law to dispose of old amalgams as a toxic waste - are not likely to try to limit the patient's exposure during removal.
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#6
Thank you all very much for your assistance and advice.
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#7
I have M.S. and I do believe that there is a link with mercury. I have also refused vaccines for my children. The truth is that if you really look at who is behind the reports stating that mercury does not cause these problems for us, you will find someone who has very full bank accounts due to their relationship with the companies that produce these mercury laced products.
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#8
Stay away from Mercury.
Years ago, when stove-pipe hats were worn by men, "hatters" often blocked the male head covering to shape and form it. They used mercury.
 
From the hatters frequent exposure to mercury, the term "mad as a hatter" came into use because of the resulting poisoning.
 
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