Transubstantiation in modern science: How can substance change without accidents
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(12-07-2012, 02:56 PM)jim111 Wrote: Does any one else think that my questions are only harmful to me?

Asking these questions is dangerous, because it could lead to doubt, or belittling of the mystery, or pride.

But I think St. Thomas asked questions like these.  It is not wrong to want to understand better what mysteries mean - to show that they are not against reason (although they are not provable); to defend them against their enemies.  If it were wrong, why would the Church try to explain things more thoroughly over the centuries (e.g. the Divinity and humanity of Christ)?  Why would it even take up the word "transubstantiation", which uses the philosophical notions of Aristotle as purified by St. Thomas?  Why would it approve and praise theologians who studied these matters? It is right to understand better what we can, if we do it humbly. 

Of course not everyone is meant to be a theologian, for many reasons.  Even if we are not it is not always wrong to ask questions (and to go to the best places for help, e.g. St. Thomas). But we should pray that we remain at peace, and that we proceed humbly in the face of such a great mystery.
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Re: Transubstantiation in modern science: How can substance change without accidents - by Doce Me - 12-07-2012, 05:44 PM



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