Transubstantiation in modern science: How can substance change without accidents
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(12-15-2012, 12:49 AM)INPEFESS Wrote:
(12-14-2012, 10:57 AM)newyorkcatholic Wrote: Christ is on the altar, in reality, whether considered in the natural order or the supernatural order, but not "physically" so if by physically we mean in terms of what can be observed or analyzed through instrumentation - which is what scientists, who speak materialistically even when they may not be philosophical materialists, mean by the word "physically"?

Despite how scientists may employ the term, I don't think the word "physically" necessarily means "perceptible," "quantifiable," or "empirical." Substance is physical material but not its quantifiable, measurable, or quantifiable attributes.

Christ is physically present on the altar, but not in any detectable sense. The two concepts are distinct.

The problem, I think, is not with the meaning of the word employed but with the approach of modern science, which, as the article points out, denies a physical existence beyond what is quantifiable. From a theological standpoint, the word "physical" is as apt as it ever was. It is not our fault that modern science fails to acknowledge the existence of a reality beyond the lens of their microscopes. 

I disagree that modern science fails to acknowledge a reality beyond their microscopes. It's just that many scientists do, others don't, and th practical consensus is that since the methods of science are experimentation and observation, that's eyt should be discussed. Ideas are generated from and tested by this.

But that's besides the point I'm trying to make. Words can have different meanings in different contexts. So perhaps I should say Christ is physically present on the altar, when we understand what substance is and that substance is physical. But in one common use of that word today in scientific circles, referring to observable properties, Christ is not present in that way under the altar.

What language though, should we use, to indicate or explain that Christ is no present in a way that we could see or show by senses or physical analysis? That the weight or %carbon of the host does not change in any testable way?
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Re: Transubstantiation in modern science: How can substance change without accidents - by newyorkcatholic - 12-15-2012, 09:40 AM



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