Anne Catherine Emmerich
#11
(12-15-2012, 10:58 PM)mikemac Wrote:
(12-15-2012, 09:28 AM)LaramieHirsch Wrote: I'm such a fan of hers, that I'll post these links to that 4-volume work I was talking about:


Volume 1
http://www.all-jesus.com/scriptures/bible1-4.htm

Volume 2
http://www.all-jesus.com/scriptures/bible2.htm

Volume 3
http://www.all-jesus.com/scriptures/bible3.htm

Volume 4
http://www.all-jesus.com/scriptures/bible4.htm

The 1914 Preface:
http://www.all-jesus.com/scriptures/preface.htm

Thanks a lot LaramieHirsch.

For those that are interested in reading The Imitation of Christ by Thomas à Kempis it can be found online here.
http://www.leaderu.com/cyber/books/imita...ation.html

And The Mystical City of God by Venerable Mary of Jesus of Agreda can be found online here.
http://www.mysticalcityofgod.org/

Lots of Catholic devotional reading for early Christmas presents today.

YAY! Gift Christmas Tree

I think The Imitation of Christ should be required reading for any Catholic.
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#12
Can anyone link or summarize the major arguments against the validity of her visions?
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#13
(12-16-2012, 06:36 AM)Walty Wrote: Can anyone link or summarize the major arguments against the validity of her visions?

I have no citation but I know that there is some question as to the man who translated her visions. Supposedly he mistranslated some of what she said and may have added his own interpretations and ideas and called them hers. They are a great read but, for now I just read them as an "inspired" novel. Though they have also never been condemned by the Church as far as I know.
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#14
I love her works, and even named one of my children after her, but as to the "validity" of her visions, well, there can be no argument against the validity of her visions as visions. Visions are metaphorical, and many of hers are delivered in what she calls "pictures", and as you know pictures can be interpreted in many ways. Clearly they are not meant to be read as simple history, but I think they can be very beneficial when read as "visions". I think I have read of arguments against her works, but they seemed to be arguments against a presumed claim that the visions are factual history.
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#15
(12-16-2012, 10:18 PM)maldon Wrote: I love her works, and even named one of my children after her, but as to the "validity" of her visions, well, there can be no argument against the validity of her visions as visions. Visions are metaphorical, and many of hers are delivered in what she calls "pictures", and as you know pictures can be interpreted in many ways. Clearly they are not meant to be read as simple history, but I think they can be very beneficial when read as "visions". I think I have read of arguments against her works, but they seemed to be arguments against a presumed claim that the visions are factual history.

My point was that many seemed to think she was either a) lying b) delusional or c) having Satanic visions.  I have no reason to think this, but I've heard it argued.
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#16
(12-17-2012, 06:00 AM)Walty Wrote:
(12-16-2012, 10:18 PM)maldon Wrote: I love her works, and even named one of my children after her, but as to the "validity" of her visions, well, there can be no argument against the validity of her visions as visions. Visions are metaphorical, and many of hers are delivered in what she calls "pictures", and as you know pictures can be interpreted in many ways. Clearly they are not meant to be read as simple history, but I think they can be very beneficial when read as "visions". I think I have read of arguments against her works, but they seemed to be arguments against a presumed claim that the visions are factual history.

My point was that many seemed to think she was either a) lying b) delusional or c) having Satanic visions.  I have no reason to think this, but I've heard it argued.

I suppose A) or B) COULD be possible(not that I believe it considering how the rest of her life was lived) but Satanic Visions!? Whoever thought that cleraly never read the books. I am half way through the first volume and if that is satanic dang...
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#17
I really disliked her visions about Noahs Ark.
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#18
It seems that a lot of arguments against Emmerich's works are those used against Valorta's Poem of the Man-God. How do the two compare?
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#19
(12-17-2012, 02:36 PM)LongfellowDeeds Wrote: It seems that a lot of arguments against Emmerich's works are those used against Valorta's Poem of the Man-God. How do the two compare?

They don't. I read part of Valorta's work and it was so weird I quit. Jesus was shown to be slightly effeminate from what I recall.
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#20
I think they are classic and that you are very lucky to have a friend who would give you such a gift,
Smile Smile Smile
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