Christmas dinners
#11
(12-18-2012, 11:05 PM)verenaerin Wrote: Christmas Eve is a big, big celebration for us and we do it Polish style. Which means meatless. So I will make mushroom soup. We will also have perogies made by the local Polish Catholic church, hot crab dip, chips and dip for the littles, and an assortment of cookies and pies. For Christmas dinner I am making individual beef wellingtons. Which are actually very easy to make, plus you make them ahead. roasted green beans, and mashed potatoes. Pretty simple for dinner. We always have a birthday cake and sing Happy Birthday to baby Jesus as well as make Him a place at the table.

I can't wait for Christmas. It is my favorite Holy Day. Everything seems so beautiful and loving. I think about those percious days when you first hold your newborn and marvel at the miracle of life. I think about the BVM holding her baby, and how He must have been the most beautiful baby in the history of the world.

I'm doing the meatless thing on Christmas Eve.  I'm going to make an egg bake in my crockpot.  Christmas Day I'm going to make ham. 
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#12
(12-22-2012, 10:43 AM)Deidre Wrote:
(12-18-2012, 11:05 PM)verenaerin Wrote: Christmas Eve is a big, big celebration for us and we do it Polish style. Which means meatless. So I will make mushroom soup. We will also have perogies made by the local Polish Catholic church, hot crab dip, chips and dip for the littles, and an assortment of cookies and pies. For Christmas dinner I am making individual beef wellingtons. Which are actually very easy to make, plus you make them ahead. roasted green beans, and mashed potatoes. Pretty simple for dinner. We always have a birthday cake and sing Happy Birthday to baby Jesus as well as make Him a place at the table.

I can't wait for Christmas. It is my favorite Holy Day. Everything seems so beautiful and loving. I think about those percious days when you first hold your newborn and marvel at the miracle of life. I think about the BVM holding her baby, and how He must have been the most beautiful baby in the history of the world.

Sigh. I always love your posts, verenaerin.  :)
Anyway, my aunt is making Alaskan King Crab legs for herself, my uncle, and my grandma, and a prime rib to go with it so that I can eat something too. I was going to see if I could join my Catholic friend and her husband for dinner to spare my aunt the trouble (it's just the two of them, no children, so they usually go out) but they moved this week.

I really don't understand a non-religious observance of Christmas. My family isn't Christian in their beliefs, and my aunt always says how she never makes anything "too special" for Christmas, choosing instead to go all out for Thanksgiving, and yet they have king crab legs.  :shrug:

Aww, thanks. I loooooove crab. And it's been along time since I had some nice prime rib. I always get a little miffed too about people celebrating Christmas when they aren't, well, celebrating Christmas, know what I mean?Seriously, get your own holiday.

The kiddies have been really sick for about a month. My eldest in particular. So tonight we are going to do something easy and fun, and even though it's not the most nutritious thing, it's calories. We are going to make rice crispy treats and cut them out with a cookie cutter in Christmas tree shapes. I'll throw in some red and green sprinkles to make it more "Christmasy". Hopefully that will lift their spirits and get their mind off being sick. My poor 5 year old has been crying for days because her stomach hurts from coughing so much

If you are visiting your friends you could make an ice box cake. Have you ever heard of them. They were all the rage in the 50 or 60s. There is no cooking involved and they make a nice presentaion. You could make it as big or small as you want. Even if your family doesn't celebrate Christmas, maybe they would at least sing happy birthday to Jesus and have some cake. If you want I can give you some good ideas for the cake combo.
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#13
(12-22-2012, 01:57 PM)Joamy Wrote:
(12-18-2012, 11:05 PM)verenaerin Wrote: Christmas Eve is a big, big celebration for us and we do it Polish style. Which means meatless. So I will make mushroom soup. We will also have perogies made by the local Polish Catholic church, hot crab dip, chips and dip for the littles, and an assortment of cookies and pies. For Christmas dinner I am making individual beef wellingtons. Which are actually very easy to make, plus you make them ahead. roasted green beans, and mashed potatoes. Pretty simple for dinner. We always have a birthday cake and sing Happy Birthday to baby Jesus as well as make Him a place at the table.

I can't wait for Christmas. It is my favorite Holy Day. Everything seems so beautiful and loving. I think about those percious days when you first hold your newborn and marvel at the miracle of life. I think about the BVM holding her baby, and how He must have been the most beautiful baby in the history of the world.

I'm doing the meatless thing on Christmas Eve.  I'm going to make an egg bake in my crockpot.  Christmas Day I'm going to make ham. 

Are you Polish as well?
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#14
(12-22-2012, 04:11 PM)verenaerin Wrote:
(12-22-2012, 01:57 PM)Joamy Wrote:
(12-18-2012, 11:05 PM)verenaerin Wrote: Christmas Eve is a big, big celebration for us and we do it Polish style. Which means meatless. So I will make mushroom soup. We will also have perogies made by the local Polish Catholic church, hot crab dip, chips and dip for the littles, and an assortment of cookies and pies. For Christmas dinner I am making individual beef wellingtons. Which are actually very easy to make, plus you make them ahead. roasted green beans, and mashed potatoes. Pretty simple for dinner. We always have a birthday cake and sing Happy Birthday to baby Jesus as well as make Him a place at the table.

I can't wait for Christmas. It is my favorite Holy Day. Everything seems so beautiful and loving. I think about those percious days when you first hold your newborn and marvel at the miracle of life. I think about the BVM holding her baby, and how He must have been the most beautiful baby in the history of the world.

I'm doing the meatless thing on Christmas Eve.  I'm going to make an egg bake in my crockpot.  Christmas Day I'm going to make ham. 

Are you Polish as well?

Nope ... Norwegian, Swedish, and German.  Possibly a little bit Polish on the German side depending on if we can figure out where exactily they originated from, but it's a stretch. 
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#15
My mom used to make home made pizza on Christmas Eve. Better than any delivery.
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#16
(12-22-2012, 07:12 PM)Spooky Wrote: My mom used to make home made pizza on Christmas Eve. Better than any delivery.

Absolutely. Mr T is our resident expert on pizza. He can even throw it in the air! Homemade pizza is the best.

(12-22-2012, 06:46 PM)Joamy Wrote: .
Nope ... Norwegian, Swedish, and German.  Possibly a little bit Polish on the German side depending on if we can figure out where exactily they originated from, but it's a stretch. 

Perhaps it is a Eastern European thing. Either way,it's a good tradition to have.
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#17
I bought veal topside.  A Boneless joint, weighing 8lbs.  Cost  65 dollars.  39 quid.

Never had it before.  It is double the price of the same cut on a cow, so hoping it is worth the money.
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#18
(12-22-2012, 07:26 PM)verenaerin Wrote: Perhaps it is a Eastern European thing. Either way, it's a good tradition to have.

It's a Catholic thing. Christmas Eve was formerly fast and complete abstinence.
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#19
Seven fishes for Christmas Eve in Italy.

tim
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#20
(12-22-2012, 08:54 PM)piabee Wrote:
(12-22-2012, 07:26 PM)verenaerin Wrote: Perhaps it is a Eastern European thing. Either way, it's a good tradition to have.

It's a Catholic thing. Christmas Eve was formerly fast and complete abstinence.


:)
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