Holy Ghost vs Holy Spirit
#11
Usually at mass when the priest is giving the sermon (or reading the scripture) he uses both spirit and ghost. However, when he makes the sign of the cross, he always says "In the Name of The Father and of The Son and of The Holy Ghost. Because of all of the new age weirdness and spirit of the council stuff, it's rather comfortable to stick with The Holy Ghost. It's like trad priests wearing baroque vestments. For some reason, they are linked with TLMs. I will note, you seldom ever hear a non-trad call him The Holy Ghost. I only heard one elderly Irish priest call him Ghost. Always found it old school. He use to also say Ahhhhh-men. He has since passed away.
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#12
Reiterating a comment I made sometime ago:

Overheard two older ladies after a TLM Mass, "Is Father a traditionalist?  He said 'Holy Spirit' instead of Holy Ghost."
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#13
(12-20-2012, 10:12 PM)TeaGuyTom Wrote: Usually at mass when the priest is giving the sermon (or reading the scripture) he uses both spirit and ghost. However, when he makes the sign of the cross, he always says "In the Name of The Father and of The Son and of The Holy Ghost. Because of all of the new age weirdness and spirit of the council stuff, it's rather comfortable to stick with The Holy Ghost. It's like trad priests wearing baroque vestments. For some reason, they are linked with TLMs. I will note, you seldom ever hear a non-trad call him The Holy Ghost. I only heard one elderly Irish priest call him Ghost. Always found it old school. He use to also say Ahhhhh-men. He has since passed away.

Here comes HK...
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#14
I am not HK, sorry!

I say "Holy Ghost",  except that when reading aloud a prayer that says "Holy Spirit", I say "Holy Spirit" even when everyone around me switches it to "Holy Ghost" (e.g. when reading a SSPX prayer card after Mass).  This is probably mostly because I don't react  quickly enough, but also because I am not that opposed to "Holy Spirit" since it is a natural translation from "Sancto Spiritu".  Other posts and articles here have explained why "Holy Ghost" might still be preferable.
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#15
The meaning of the word "Ghost" has changed in English in recent centuries; now it has a connotation being spooky rather than majestic.  The reason that people associate "Holy Ghost" with Trads is because outside of our circles the word has almost entirely to do with Halloween, writing under another person's name and some sort of West Coast hip-hop thing.  The words are interchangeable, but in modern English "Spirit" gets closer to the meaning than "Ghost."
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#16
(12-20-2012, 11:42 PM)Parmandur Wrote: some sort of West Coast hip-hop thing.

Ghostface Killah!
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#17
(12-21-2012, 12:38 AM)Phillipus Iacobus Wrote:
(12-20-2012, 11:42 PM)Parmandur Wrote: some sort of West Coast hip-hop thing.

Ghostface Killah!

I'll be honest, I don't know what that means.  But, it is an example of why "Ghost" is growing inappropriate within spoken language as a way of talking about the third Person of the Holy Trinity; it is frivolous rather than respectful.
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#18
Holy Ghost - Holy Spirit

Both appear in the traditional Litany of the Holy Ghost. They are the same.
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#19
(12-20-2012, 11:42 PM)Parmandur Wrote: The meaning of the word "Ghost" has changed in English in recent centuries; now it has a connotation being spooky rather than majestic.  The reason that people associate "Holy Ghost" with Trads is because outside of our circles the word has almost entirely to do with Halloween, writing under another person's name and some sort of West Coast hip-hop thing.  The words are interchangeable, but in modern English "Spirit" gets closer to the meaning than "Ghost."

"Spirit," in cultural and modern context, has deviated connotation as well. Assuming a more vague, open ended and slightly leaning Gnostic idea of the word in the context, the third Person of the Trinity, we are using it in. Can't please everyone; I just say both interchangeably, most of the time subconsciously.
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#20
(12-21-2012, 04:09 AM)TS Aquinas Wrote:
(12-20-2012, 11:42 PM)Parmandur Wrote: The meaning of the word "Ghost" has changed in English in recent centuries; now it has a connotation being spooky rather than majestic.  The reason that people associate "Holy Ghost" with Trads is because outside of our circles the word has almost entirely to do with Halloween, writing under another person's name and some sort of West Coast hip-hop thing.  The words are interchangeable, but in modern English "Spirit" gets closer to the meaning than "Ghost."

"Spirit," in cultural and modern context, has deviated connotation as well. Assuming a more vague, open ended and slightly leaning Gnostic idea of the word in the context, the third Person of the Trinity, we are using it in. Can't please everyone; I just say both interchangeably, most of the time subconsciously.

But if Mother Church re-adopt the usage 'Holy Ghost' would it not be for the benefit of our Catholic identity? Rather than being somewhat apathetic about it?
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