Holy Ghost vs Holy Spirit
#21
I don't know that "Holy Ghost" was an exclusively Catholic usage. I recall from watching the wedding of Prince William and Kate Middelton last year that Dr Rowan Williams (aka then archdruid of Canterbury) used Holy Ghost.
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#22
(12-21-2012, 03:37 PM)tridentinist Wrote: I don't know that "Holy Ghost" was an exclusively Catholic usage. I recall from watching the wedding of Prince William and Kate Middelton last year that Dr Rowan Williams (aka then archdruid of Canterbury) used Holy Ghost.

It wasn't a trademark of the Catholic Church, didn't many protestant denominations refer to the Trinity as well? And didn't they follow the Church's lead with 'Holy Ghost'? and then with 'Holy Spirit'?
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#23
"Holy Ghost" is certainly used frequently among fundamentalists who use the KJV; it is the normal way of referring to the Third Person of the Trinity in Anglican service books before the reforms of the 1970s.

I think "Spirit" had gradually been displacing "Ghost" in speech anyway; "Ghost" held on because it was used in prayers, which tend to resist changes in the vernacular.  The translation of the NO into English using "Spirit" seems to have accelerated a change already happening, and effectively has left "Ghost" in use really only among Catholics who rarely or never attend the new rites.  Myself, I use "Spirit," mostly because I grew up saying that, but I don't prefer either really.  Neither one is more accurate, and neither is more appropriate - it's purely a matter of style.
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#24
This well preceeds the changes initiated by Vatican II.  My 1951 St. Joseph's Daily Missal uses Holy Ghost but my 1961 St. Joseph's Daily Missal uses Holy Spirit.

Even more interesting, I looked at my Confraternity version of the New Testament (1941) and it uses Holy Spirit.
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#25
Since spirit is becoming vague and ghost is associated with spooks, maybe we can say "In the Name of the Father and of The Son and of The Paraclete" ?  ???
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#26
(12-21-2012, 08:21 PM)aquinas138 Wrote: "Holy Ghost" is certainly used frequently among fundamentalists who use the KJV; it is the normal way of referring to the Third Person of the Trinity in Anglican service books before the reforms of the 1970s.

I think "Spirit" had gradually been displacing "Ghost" in speech anyway; "Ghost" held on because it was used in prayers, which tend to resist changes in the vernacular.  The translation of the NO into English using "Spirit" seems to have accelerated a change already happening, and effectively has left "Ghost" in use really only among Catholics who rarely or never attend the new rites.  Myself, I use "Spirit," mostly because I grew up saying that, but I don't prefer either really.  Neither one is more accurate, and neither is more appropriate - it's purely a matter of style.

This, except that I usually use 'Ghost' because I came out of pre-1970s Anglicanism. :)
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#27
I do actually say Holy Ghost myself for similar reasons; but I also realize that I am a linguistic weirdo, and the move to say Holy Spirit makes sense.
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