Pope Paul VI -- Blistering Indictment
#11
Quote: What did he think the Vatican could do? How many troops did you expect the Vatican to send over there?

Stood up, condemned the communists.  Rally the South to fight, and rally the Catholic world to aid their brothers.  Instead he refused and now the Vietnamese are slave laborers like the Chinese.

This exchange between the South rep and the Pope is pathetic.  Obviously it would be scandalous to give any honors to such a traitor to the faithful.
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#12
THe following is the obituary of the man who found and translated the transcripted conversation between Paul VI and the South Vietnamese Foreign Minister.

Published in Stamford Advocate on October 2, 2012

John O. Koehler


Koehler , John O.
John O. Koehler, 82, of Stamford passed away peacefully at home on Friday, September 28, 2012.

He is survived by his daughter, Teresa Koehler of Hillsborough, NJ, and three grandchildren, as well as triplet brothers living in Germany and trusted and cherished friend Anne Cron. A journalist for nearly four decades, retired in 1985 from The Associated Press as an assistant general manager and managing director of world services. He subsequently formed Koehler International Limited, a consulting firm specializing in international governmental and public affairs, communications, crisis management and political/economic risk analysis. Koehler's assignments during 28 years with The AP included service as a foreign correspondent in Germany for six years. As head of the Bonn bureau, Koehler covered nine trips of Soviet leader Nikita Krushchev, including the volatile Kennedy-Kruschchev Vienna meeting; the emergence of West Germany under Chancellor Adenauer as a world power, and the height of the Cold War. He also headed the Berlin bureau, reporting on the building of the Communist Wall and the resulting military confrontations between the United States and the Soviets. For his journalistic achievements in West Germany, the German Chancellor awarded him the German Cross of Merit First Class. Immediately after his retirement from The Associated Press, Koehler was commissioned to conduct a number of sensitive studies relating to the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan for the U.S. Congress, the National Security Council and the U.S. Information Agency. This entailed making on-the-spot assessments throughout Asia. President Ronald Reagan appointed Koehler as Assistant to the President and Director of Communications in 1987. He had been advising Mr. Reagan for some years before his election. He was also a consultant and special advisor to the director of the U.S. Information Agency. Koehler conducted a major study on improving U.S. government communications with foreign media. In mid-summer 1987, Koehler was sent to Europe to assess for President Reagan the various governments, public and media perception on a proposed US-Soviet treaty eliminating intermediate range nuclear weapons. The INF Treaty was successfully concluded. In 1988, Koehler was appointed by President Reagan for a three-year term to the national Commission for Employment Policy. As consultant to the chairman of one of the world's largest banks, Koehler worked in projects involving the Third World debt crisis and he has advised other top executives on public affairs aspects of the European ecomomic/political integration. He also served as a consultant and advisor to the Amir of Bahrain, the late H.H. Shaikh Isa bin Salman Al Khalifa. He was instrumental in having the Amir paying a state visit with President Reagan and in the establishment of the U.S. Navy Fifth Fleet Base in Bahrain. Koehler was born in 1930 in Dresden, Germany. At age 10 he was accepted at the Dresden Higher Business School where he also studied English, French and Latin. To avoid being forced into the Hitler Youth, he volunteered to serve as an air raid police runner during the World War II bombings of Dresden. Then he left home, headed for the American lines where met with a US combat patrol and volunteered to serve as an interpreter with the US 405th Infantry Regiment. He served until the end of World War II. After that he worked for US criminal investigation and counterintelligence units. In 1954 he immigrated to the United States and was naturalized a U.S. citizen a year later after enlisting in the U.S. Army. Bilingual in German and with a working knowledge of Russian, he then served 13 years on active and reserve duty, specializing in intelligence collection and counter-espionage. Serving as an enlisted man, he was awarded a direct commission as an officer and was honorably discharged as a captain. Besides military medals, the Secretary of Defense William S. Cohen bestowed him the Department of Defense Cold War Citation. Koehler is the author of "Stasi: The Untold Story of the East German Secret Police" and "Spies in the Vatican: The Soviet Union's Cold War Against the Catholic Church."

Family and friends may call at The Nicholas F. Cognetta Funeral Home & Crematory, 104 Myrtle Avenue, Stamford, CT 06902 on Friday, October 5, 2012 from 4:00-7:00 PM. Inurnment with full military honors will be held at Arlington National Cemetery, VA at a later date.
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#13
(12-31-2012, 06:56 PM)ggreg Wrote: I don't buy that explanation.  I work with people at the top of organisations and they are not idiots.  Let's stop excusing these people like they take some unintelligent parish priest and put him in the chair of Peter.  They are intelligent, ambitious and capable enough to get to the papacy through the various ranks of the church. None of them are dummies.  Far from it.

Montini has betrayed the Catholic Church since at least 1944 through hidden contacts with the soviets and the local italian communists, though his boss, the Pope Pius XII had strictly forbidden this. It is unclear how he collaborated  with the apostate jesuit Alighiero Tondi in the Secretariate of State. Tondi (unknowingly to Montini? That's not sure) provided the soviets with the names of the priests that  Pius XII actually was secretly sending beyond the Iron Curtain where they were all arrested and murdered or sent to the Gulag).
Tondi was unmasked in the wake of Montini's dismissal after his secret contacts were brought up to the Pope by the french colonel Arnould.
Of course, after that scandal, Pius XII declined to ever name Montini a cardinal.
Usually in many countries, the State betrayal's punishment is the death penalty but to the eyes of John XIII, that of Montini looked a very venial sin: He bestowed Montini the cardinal's hat a few days after he was elected, thus seriously contravening to the late pope's wishes and opening him the road to the papacy.
In the same way, the bloody handed Tondi was rehabilitated. Once he became Pope, Montini even allowed him to marry a communist woman and appointed him again in the Vatican's administration.

AND THEY WANT TO MAKE PAUL VI A SAINT?!!?
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#14
(12-31-2012, 07:53 PM)James02 Wrote:
Quote: What did he think the Vatican could do? How many troops did you expect the Vatican to send over there?

Stood up, condemned the communists.  Rally the South to fight, and rally the Catholic world to aid their brothers.  Instead he refused and now the Vietnamese are slave laborers like the Chinese.

This exchange between the South rep and the Pope is pathetic.  Obviously it would be scandalous to give any honors to such a traitor to the faithful.

Hear, hear.

The Vatican might not have had an army or could not have called a crusade, but it did have the power of speech--which the pope did not use.

The "blistering indictment" seems to be obvious in the pope's lack of helpfulness or support.
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