What non-Roman rite liturgies have you been to?
#21
(01-07-2013, 02:45 PM)rbjmartin Wrote:
(01-07-2013, 01:48 AM)DoktorDespot Wrote: It is one of my personal goals to attend mass (or Divine Liturgy for the East) celebrated according to every liturgical rite of the Church. I am curious as to what different rites everyone has experienced beyond the regular roman rite( TLM and NO).

I will start. I have been to:

Dominican rite Missa Cantata
Traditional Cistercian rite mass (which I served at)
Anglican use mass (really part if the roman rite but different enough that I count it)
Melkite DL
Maronite DL
Ruthenian Catholic DL
Ukrainian Catholic DL
Syro-Malabar DL

With the exception of the Cisterian rite and Dominican rite, those are exactly all the same ones I've attended.

The Cistercian rite is not that exciting really. Although at one time it had many distinctive traits, it was reformed to be essentially very similar to the Roman rite. Probably the most notable difference is that it completely lacks sequences. So, on All Souls Day (which was the mass I served at actually) there was no Dies Irae. The priest also offers the chalice and host together at one time. The format of the Cistercian missal is different though, and it was very interesting to see. 
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#22
Novus Ordo



























just kidding  :LOL:
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#23
(01-07-2013, 04:55 AM)jovan66102 Wrote: Which Byzantine Rite? There are fourteen Byzantine Rite Catholic Churches (including the Ukrainians). :)

I remember now.  It was called the rite of St. John Chrysostom.  :Hmm:
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#24
(01-07-2013, 03:03 PM)Nainsi Wrote: I'm not sure this fits, but...
Years ago I attended a Greek Orthodox Mass. It was beautiful but it unsettled me in several ways.
I've also been to an Episcopal "Mass"?/Service.
And I don't know what to call it but I attended one Mass that had bean bags, guitars, folk music... It was at a Roman Catholic Church fellowship hall. I wasn't sure if I should include it but it definitely wasn't a proper Mass so I decided I would.
~nan

I'm under the impression that the OP asked what other Catholic liturgies we've been to.  Orthodox isn't Catholic, as they don't recognize the pope as head of the Church.  And Episcopal is protestant.  And it sounds like the bean-bag Mass was an NO, and there's disagreement about the catholicity of that, as you've probably noticed!   

If I'm not mistaken, your sensus catholicus is coming along very nicely.  :)
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#25
I would never add the Anglican Use to this list, it's totally a Novus Ordo offshoot
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#26
(01-07-2013, 08:15 PM)salus Wrote: I would never add the Anglican Use to this list, it's totally a Novus Ordo offshoot

Well it differs from the NO more than say the Dominican rite does from the TLM, so I think it counts for the sake of discussion.
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#27
Pontifical Divine Liturgy (x2)?
Divine Liturgy of St John Chrysostom
Divine Liturgy of St Basil the Great
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#28
(01-07-2013, 08:06 PM)per_passionem_eius Wrote:
(01-07-2013, 04:55 AM)jovan66102 Wrote: Which Byzantine Rite? There are fourteen Byzantine Rite Catholic Churches (including the Ukrainians). :)

I remember now.  It was called the rite of St. John Chrysostom.  :Hmm:

Yep, all fourteen different Rites celebrate that! :)
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#29
(01-07-2013, 10:31 PM)jovan66102 Wrote:
(01-07-2013, 08:06 PM)per_passionem_eius Wrote:
(01-07-2013, 04:55 AM)jovan66102 Wrote: Which Byzantine Rite? There are fourteen Byzantine Rite Catholic Churches (including the Ukrainians). :)

I remember now.  It was called the rite of St. John Chrysostom.  :Hmm:

Yep, all fourteen different Rites celebrate that! :)

I think that each of the rites celebrates that Liturgy in its own unique way. I wish that there were greater resources about the different Eastern rites and their practices, but it is hard to find this sort of information, particularly in English and from a Catholic perspective.
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#30
(01-07-2013, 08:06 PM)per_passionem_eius Wrote:
(01-07-2013, 04:55 AM)jovan66102 Wrote: Which Byzantine Rite? There are fourteen Byzantine Rite Catholic Churches (including the Ukrainians). :)

I remember now.  It was called the rite of St. John Chrysostom.  :Hmm:

The Liturgy of St John Chrysostom is the most prevalent form in the Byzantine Rite. It has its origins from the Antionchean traditions and the Liturgy of St James, which deviated into a somewhat different Liturgy through Cappadocian Fathers influence. Thus was born the DL of St Chrysostom and the DL of St Basil.

Since I am a visual learner, this is a good enough representation:
[Image: catholic_rites2.gif]
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