What non-Roman rite liturgies have you been to?
#31
UnamSanctam,

I had been looking for a representation of the different rites of the Church in this manner. Thank you very much .
Reply
#32
(01-08-2013, 09:45 PM)DoktorDespot Wrote: ...but it is hard to find this sort of information, particularly in English and from a Catholic perspective.

Lamentably, this is true. Most resources are from the Orthodox or semi-Orthodox viewpoint.

Here may be of some use. It is the page of the Eparchy of Philadelphia. http://www.ukrarcheparchy.us/index.php?categoryid=28

In only a short time, the Catechism of the Ukrainian Catholic Church will be translated into English, by my very own Bishop David Motiuk and company.
Reply
#33
(01-08-2013, 09:57 PM)DoktorDespot Wrote: UnamSanctam,

I had been looking for a representation of the different rites of the Church in this manner. Thank you very much .

Just what the Doktor ordered eh. haha.

Here is a statistical representation of the Churches of the East.

http://www.docstoc.com/docs/6162932/The-...e-Armenian
Reply
#34
I've been to a Dominican Rite Mass and am hoping to get to a Ukrainian Catholic Church nearby me soon.
Reply
#35
I have been to the Byzantine rite a couple of times, I actually really enjoy it. There was a Dominican rite near me recently but I didn't get to make it,  :(( .
Reply
#36
I find the Dominican rite to be very interesting. It has a reputation as maintaining many of the more medieval practices in the mass, while at the same time being simpler than the Roman rite, especially in terms of its prayers. However, I found that it seemed more involved in terms of gestures and ceremonies than the roman rite. At the one I attended, it seemed as if the acolytes were constantly changing position for reasons that I did not fully understand. In addition, the priest makes additional gestures, such as stretching out his hands in a cruciform position after the consecration. I do remember that at the Mass I attended the Alleluia verse was accidentally left out. The brothers in the choir were quite embarrassed when  I asked them about it afterwards.
Reply
#37
Where do you go to the Dominican rite?
Reply
#38
At the priory of the Dominican House of Studies in Washington DC.
Reply
#39
(01-08-2013, 10:00 PM)UnamSanctam Wrote: Bishop David Motiuk

Boy, can he sing the Liturgy!!
Reply
#40
(01-08-2013, 09:55 PM)UnamSanctam Wrote: [Image: catholic_rites2.gif]

In reference of the question about various uses within a rite, the Byzantine rite has several uses (more like flavors really, not exactly in the same sense as the Anglican Use).  Most of the Byzantine churches fall into either the Slavic use (Russian, Ukrainian, Belarussian, Georgian, Ruthenian, Slovak, Krizevci, Hungarian) or the Greek use (Greek, Albanian, Italo-Greek, Melkite), or tend to mix the two (Romanian, Bulgarian).  Within uses, there are recensions.  So within the Slavic use, the Ruthenian church uses the Carpathian recension.  In the Ukrainian church, some parishes use the Carpathian recension, most use the Galician recension.  The Georgian church was originally of the Armenian rite, so it probably could be said to use a Caucasian recension.  In the Greek use, the Melkite church has its own recension, and even further there is a Jerusalem recension that is generally not practiced among Orthodox outside the Patriarchate of Jerusalem.

The various uses and recensions hang on minor differences for the most part, and can probably be likened to the various regional peculiarities within the Roman rite prior to the Tridentine consolidation.  No one who regularly attends a Jerusalem use Melkite liturgy would be lost if they were to attend a Galician use Ukrainian liturgy.
Reply




Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)