Went to Byzantine Catholic Liturgy this morning
#1
I am going on vacation and won't be able to attend mass tomorrow and so I thought I'd fill the Sunday obligation by going to DL. I've been to a Melkite liturgy and it felt very, ummm, ethnic? But this was almost like a reverent OF low mass. It was at Annunciation Byzantine Catholic Church in Anaheim. They celebrate a daily DL in the side chapel, which looks more like a tiny "crying room". The church was just built within the last 6 years. It is far from a traditional Eastern looking church but it is equally far from a modern NO building. The pews are like a bunch of individual cushioned chairs mounted to a traditional pew. Pretty comfortable! One thing that I found to be odd was that there wasn't a iconostasis (icon wall). I don't think they ever had one. One of the parishioners told me that they are waiting on one to arrive. Also, the propers and hymns didn't sound all that traditional. 

What are some of your experiences with Byzantine liturgy?

Here are a few pics taken with my phone. I should post these in the GOOD LOOKING CHURCHES BUILT IN MODERN TIMES thread, I guess

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#2
Cool pictures; I'm sure they will probable have an inconostatis installed at some point ~ they do have a "faux iconostasis" with the Theotokis on the left and Christ on the right, as I've seen done when the Divine Liturgy is celebrated in a Latin Rite church.

In my very limited experience (and picture lurking) Ruthenian iconostasis tend to be "see through" (wood or metal grill work) while Greek Orthodox ones tend to be solid.  Real "hard core" Orthodox priests will have the Royal Door (the center opening) closed during the Canon, so nothing can be see, but some leave it open.  The Greek Orthodox parish in Spokane, WA has "dutch doors" (half doors) in the center, so they symbolically close the Royal Doors during the consecration, but the altar can still be seen.
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#3
One gigantic error that I made was crossing my arms and bowing to receive communion. I was told to do this by the Melkites and then when I went to receive communion I went ahead and did so but only received a blessing.
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#4
(01-12-2013, 06:32 PM)MorganHiver Wrote: One gigantic error that I made was crossing my arms and bowing to receive communion. I was told to do this by the Melkites and then when I went to receive communion I went ahead and did so but only received a blessing.
cross yourself...aproach ....Open mouth...toung in...flip head back like pez dispenser. I am Byzantine Ruthenian my whole life but presently serving at a Ukrainian Parish
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