Forget Cholesterol, Inflammation's the Real Enemy
#1
I have always thought that saturated fats were getting a bum rap on heart disease. I would see people with normal cholesterol levels having heart attacks all the time. Then there was the studies showing a link to Parkensonian symptoms and the use of Statin (like Lipitor) drug use. My dear wife, had normal cholesterol and a clean cardiac cath just a couple of years before she died of complications of an Acute Coronary Syndrome (ACS).

Inflammation is the key and cholesterol is just the scab that contains it. Now it seems, all those vegetable oils and the things in the low-fat foods are likely suspects at increasing the inflammation in our bodies that sets us up for ACS. I have been on statin drugs for years after my stents were put in my heart. I've kept my cholesterol low, around 100 and always wondered about if my nervious system was getting enough myelin to insulate the nerves. Myelin is made from cholesterol and the brain is largely made up of cholesterol. I kinda put off the muscle aches and the neuropathies as part of aging and type 2 diabetes, but now I wonder if it may be related to the lowered cholesterol that my cardiologist is adamant about me keeping.

This article (there have been a few others as of late too) really supports my suspicions:

http://www.cbn.com/cbnnews/healthscience...eal-Enemy/

Forget Cholesterol, Inflammation's the Real Enemy

Keeping up with which foods to eat and which ones to avoid could be a full-time job. That's because scientists continue to learn more about what we put in our bodies.

Some of their latest findings could change your mind about fat.

Twenty years ago, doctors told us to stay away from high-fat foods like eggs, bacon, and butter because they raised cholesterol and could lead to heart disease.

America responded and stopped eating fat. In its place, however, we ate more sugar and other carbohydrates.

How did that work out? Not great. As a whole, Americans grew fatter and sicker than before. Scientists back then may have reached the wrong conclusion.

Now a growing number of medical experts say weight gain, heart disease, and other illnesses are not caused by high cholesterol, but by something different: inflammation.

That means instead of avoiding foods that raise our cholesterol, we need to avoid foods that cause inflammation.

Cholesterol's Bad Rap

Dr. Beverly Teter, a lipid biochemist at the University of Maryland, studies how the different kinds of fat in food affect our health.

Teter said scientists wrongly blamed cholesterol for heart disease when they saw high levels of it at a damaged blood vessel. Teter believes the body put the cholesterol there to fix the problem, which was actually caused by inflammation.

"It's the inflammation in the vessels that start the lesion," she explained. "The body then sends the cholesterol like a scab to cover over it to protect the blood system and the vessel wall from further damage."

Research also shows cholesterol can protect against respiratory and gastrointestinal problems, and helps create vitamin D. People with higher cholesterol live longer.

Teter said that's a scientific fact that she can vouch for personally.

"I come from a family that has, my mother's side, had naturally high cholesterol. Her cholesterol was between 380 and 420 when I started watching her medical records, and she died at 97," she said. "So I don't think that cholesterol was too bad for her."

Inflammation Producers

Cholesterol is especially important in the brain, which contains more cholesterol than any other organ and needs it in order for a message to get passed from one brain cell to another.

Therefore, Teter said when it comes to food choices, don't worry if it raises your cholesterol. Focus your attention instead on whether it reduces inflammation.

When choosing which fats to eat, pick the ones that are high in Omega 3 fats and also choose natural saturated fats. On the other hand, stay away from the fats that lead to inflammation, such as trans fats and Omega 6 fats.

How to you tell the healthy Omega 3s from the unhealthy Omega 6 fats? Vegetable oils and mayonnaise contain Omega 6 fats, so be careful with how much you consume.

Ideally, Omega 6 fats are healthy but only when consumed in the same amount as Omega 3 fats. The typical American, however, consumes 15 times more Omega 6 fats than Omega 3s. This imbalance creates inflammation.

So cut back on the Omega 6s and increase your consumption of Omega 3s. These are in foods like olive oil and avocados.

Cold water fish is an excellent source of Omega 3 fat, particularly DHA, which is a super brain booster. One great way to make sure you're getting enough Omega 3, specifically DHA, is by taking a fish oil supplement. Doctors recommend one that contains at least 750 mg of DHA daily.

Butter is Better

At one time dieticians considered margarine, which is a trans fat, heart healthy. Doctors now say a better choice is butter.

In the last 20 years, trans fats have become the ingredient of choice for almost all processed foods. You can tell something contains trans fat if you see the word "hydrogenated" in the list of ingredients.

Saturated fats have really gotten a bad reputation over the last couple of decades. But they are not as bad as they have been made out to be. In fact, doctors recommend eating some saturated fats every day, such as coconut oil.

This saturated fat fights colds and the flu and has even reversed the symptoms of Alzheimers, ALS and Parkinson's Disease in some people.

Say 'No' to Inflammation

You should also remember those non-fat foods that make us fat and increase inflammation contain sugar and refined carbohydrates. Anything containing high fructose corn syrup or other sugars leads to inflammation.

So do grains, especially refined grains such as white bread, pasta, rice, and so on.

So when it comes to your health, inflammation beats out cholesterol as the new enemy. Take it on by saying "yes" to foods like fish and coconut oil, and "no" to sugar and carbohydrates, and dangerous trans fats.
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#2
There is a researcher who has shown a low salt diet is the cause of many heart attacks and strokes. The lack of salt say a tbsp. a day causes the kidneys to produce too much renin and Voila, boom. Michael Creighton wrote before his death that science as we have known it in the last 50 years is crap and is never published in refereed journals, it's all political progressiveism.

tim
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#3
(02-05-2013, 09:24 AM)Tim Wrote: There is a researcher who has shown a low salt diet is the cause of many heart attacks and strokes. The lack of salt say a tbsp. a day causes the kidneys to produce too much renin and Voila, boom. Michael Creighton wrote before his death that science as we have known it in the last 50 years is crap and is never published in refereed journals, it's all political progressiveism.

tim

Ya, he was right and salt is what allows the kidneys to pump out the renin.

Then there was a recent study, which supported another quite similar study, that showed that the salt in our bodies is processed over a two day cycle and a number of samples is necessary in order to get a proper reading. Its like trying to get the mean surface height on the bay, but only sampling the height once and disregarding the tides. BTW: The studies were done on people studying the effects of prolonged space travel, like to Mars.

Too much science based upon 'popular opinion'.
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