The last straw...
#21
Praying for your family, V.

God forbid I should judge a priest, but I believe examples like this explain why 70% of Catholics don't believe in the Real Presence anymore.

Pray
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#22
(02-13-2013, 11:24 PM)verenaerin Wrote:
(02-13-2013, 11:10 PM)Mithrandylan Wrote:
(02-13-2013, 10:29 PM)verenaerin Wrote:
(02-13-2013, 09:34 PM)Vincentius Wrote: My thoughts and just saying, if you want your child to lose his/her faith send them to public school, it's free. Why pay those high tuitions? 

Explain.

Not to speak on Vincentius' behalf, but I think he agrees with you and is expressing it in a different manner.

As in, if one is going to send one's child to a school that is a harm to their faith, better to send them to public school since you don't have to pay the high tuition.

Thanks. I guess my initial response was defensive because I didn't understand. Which is why I just ask for clarification. I don't want to fight. This entire thing is disheartening on many levels. But I love my babies, so that is my focus.


Thank you everyone for your kind words and prayers.

My regrets for not clarifying.  Just as Mithrandylan explained.  The local N.O. parish school does not truly keep the purity of the faith anymore and therefore don't impart what is the Truth of the faith.  Why pay those high tuitions.  The children would be better off in public schools.  The responsibility of teaching the Catholic faith actually belongs to the parents, more than ever now.  Its deploring to see how they prepare children for First Holy Communion and teach them to receive in the hand.  When my children were growing up I sent them public schools and to the FSSP parish for Sunday school.  This was when we lived in OK and there was a traditional parish in OKC.  Fortunate for us. 
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#23
(02-14-2013, 12:58 PM)Vincentius Wrote:
(02-13-2013, 11:24 PM)verenaerin Wrote:
(02-13-2013, 11:10 PM)Mithrandylan Wrote:
(02-13-2013, 10:29 PM)verenaerin Wrote:
(02-13-2013, 09:34 PM)Vincentius Wrote: My thoughts and just saying, if you want your child to lose his/her faith send them to public school, it's free. Why pay those high tuitions? 

Explain.

Not to speak on Vincentius' behalf, but I think he agrees with you and is expressing it in a different manner.

As in, if one is going to send one's child to a school that is a harm to their faith, better to send them to public school since you don't have to pay the high tuition.

Thanks. I guess my initial response was defensive because I didn't understand. Which is why I just ask for clarification. I don't want to fight. This entire thing is disheartening on many levels. But I love my babies, so that is my focus.


Thank you everyone for your kind words and prayers.

My regrets for not clarifying.  Just as Mithrandylan explained.  The local N.O. parish school does not truly keep the purity of the faith anymore and therefore don't impart what is the Truth of the faith.  Why pay those high tuitions.  The children would be better off in public schools.  The responsibility of teaching the Catholic faith actually belongs to the parents, more than ever now.  Its deploring to see how they prepare children for First Holy Communion and teach them to receive in the hand.  When my children were growing up I sent them public schools and to the FSSP parish for Sunday school.  This was when we lived in OK and there was a traditional parish in OKC.  Fortunate for us. 

Public school is not an option here. I was only going to keep her in school this year and then homeschool starting the 1rst grade anyway. I sent her to K not with the expectation of them teaching her the faith, but as a help for me since my health is poor. I can deal with wishy washy in the ciriculum nw, because we live the faith and teach it at home, which is a greater influence. But I cannot tolerate scandal in the Mass. I'm not saying that it was invalid or anything like that, but  I was scandalize by the purposful disrespect (I feel I need a stronger word). So tomorrow is her last day. I will inform to school on Monday. And then go into the interview to explain myself. They'll probably call the priest in as well.- yay.
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#24
Verenaerin-

Sorry to chime in so late here but I thought I would share my family’s experience.

Our two children (7 and 9) attend a diocesan school. We go to Mass primarily at a diocesan TLM (not the same parish as the school) and occasionally attend an SSPX chapel as well.

Our position has always been that we send them to Catholic School, not so much for what they get out of it; but to protect them from what they may learn in public school- even with rampant liberalism and modernism, there are certainly still Catholic truths that are reflected in the Catholic educational system.

Religious instruction is obviously insufficient at school so we supplement this at home and make sure that we review the lessons that are being taught and correct them to our children where necessary.

We see ourselves as kind of working from within to be an example to others. Our children are well versed in their catechism and take every opportunity to share what they know with their friends and teachers. They have shared with their classes their use of scapulars, the Rosary, praying the Ave in Latin and other things that their classmates may not have been exposed to otherwise. My son receives Holy Communion kneeling on the tongue at school N.O. Masses and my daughter veils at school Masses.

We were able to arrange my son’s first Holy Communion to be given at the TLM (shameless plug for my friend’s blog with pics of the wonderful event: http://phillytlm.blogspot.com/2012/04/fi...inary.html)- and though the our parish priest made us jump through a few hoops to accomplish it; when we approached about our daughter’s first Holy Communion this upcoming April, he kind of waived us off saying “whatever, whatever…”.

Currently our son’s class is doing a project on famous Philadelphians and my son chose St. John Neumann. They have to do a presentation, in the character of their subject before the entire school and my son’s contains a short explanation that the Mass which St. John Neumann celebrated was different than the Mass that most children know about today.

We have not seen the kind of blatant disrespect that you described at the Mass you attended but we have butted heads a few times with the school hierarchy- most recently when my daughter’s gym day coincided with Friday Mass and we wanted her to wear a dress rather than her gym uniform. I think that we are probably seen as the resident weirdos by some of the other parents, but we continue to view what we do there as a powerful witness to our traditional faith and values.

Not that our presence has anything to do with this, but this coming March 19th, St Joseph’s Day, one of the parishes that our school is attached to is hosting a sung TLM to be said by the priest of the diocesan Mass that we normally attend. We were shocked and overjoyed by this news. (St Madeline’s in Ridley Park- 7pm 3/19/13 for any Philadelphia area fishies) My children have invited all of their friends and my son will be serving the Mass. We hope that we can help plant some good seeds with this.

Yes, it’s sometimes very difficult to hang in there in the midst of problems and abuses, but we feel the fruit that our efforts may bear make in worthwhile.

Many prayers for you and yours,
Henry
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#25
Thank you for your very kind post Henry.

Your family sounds like and excellent example of the right way to go about it. One of the difficulties I have had with catechizing at home is that my daughter is exhausted when she gets home. There is homework, projects, besides dinner, etc.

She has been recently dx with asthma that keeps her coughing half the night. So the poor kid is just wiped. On Friday she came home all excited because she was able to run at recess and didn't have to sit down once from coughing fits. This is a first in months and months.

I pray that God gives me the patience to do this. I also wouldn't mind an army of angels to do housework and entertain my 18mo single baby wrecking crew while I HS.


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#26
As far as home-schooling goes. I have several friends that home-school. None of them regretted that decision. It's hard work, but it's worth it.

And most of the "Catholic" schools these days aren't much better than the public schools, sad to say.
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