The Next Pope / Latin Mass ... What the new Pope Should Do
#1
Michael Voris The Next Pope and the Latin Mass
http://www.ChurchMilitant.TV/share/watch.php?vidID=vort-2013-03-04
 


And from the Lew Rockwell article, What the Next Pope Should Do
"So what should be the goal of the next Pope? To preserve and propagate the faith. In these times, there are at least three strategic imperatives. "
Comment: I don't follow Lew Rockwell but there's much to praise in this article.
Full article:
What the Next Pope Should Do

http://www.lewrockwell.com/rockwell/next-pope.html
by Llewellyn H. Rockwell, Jr.

It's presumptuous to address this topic, but since the web makes expansive punditry impossible to resist, I will anyway. Fortunately, the web has also made possible the Catholic Encyclopedia online (1917 edition), which used to be very difficult to find and expensive to own.

At last, persistent confusions on the question of the papacy can be clarified despite popular misconceptions (held by Catholics and non-Catholics). You can even read the entry on the Pope, along with a defense of the papacy against its detractors and a listing of its powers and responsibilities.

It turns out that the Pope, in addition to the pastoral duties required of every priest and Bishop, and the special duties and powers that come with being the Bishop of Rome, has only one primary job: to exercise "ordinary, immediate, and episcopal jurisdiction over all the faithful" toward the goal of "the preservation and the propagation of the faith." That is to say, the purpose of all the power of his office is to spread Catholicism (not his peculiar version but the unchanging faith as taught by the apostles and developed over two millennia) and protect it from error.

My, how far we've come. Nowadays, the Pope, when not being treated as a world media figure, is seen as an all-powerful spokesman for the Holy Spirit in all matters. But that has never been Church teaching: even the Pope's ex cathedra power of infallibility extends only to matters of faith and morals (not politics, economics, or administrative disciplines within the Church) and only insofar as he defines a teaching that can be shown to have always been taught.

The danger that comes with exaggerating the personal power and perfection of the Pope, or confusing doctrinal infallibility with personal impeccability is that it can so easily be shown to be contradicted by history, which is so clearly full of Popes who were personally compromised in one way or another.

The miracle of the Papacy is not that such great men have held the office (though many have); it is that no matter how bad things have been in the history of the Church, the core doctrine and moral system of the Catholic religion has never been falsely taught from the Chair of Peter in 2,000 years.

So what should be the goal of the next Pope? To preserve and propagate the faith. In these times, there are at least three strategic imperatives.

First, forget about politics and start protecting the Catholic faithful against the actions by the Bishops that have made it very difficult to be a Catholic in today's setting. Catholics expect attacks from the media and the government. They don't expect attacks from the local Bishop and his henchpeople. If the Vatican bothered to read the chilling weekly content of The Wanderer newspaper, it would have plenty of evidence that the Bishops are out of control.

Second, forget about treating Vatican II as the "new Pentecost" and start to regard it as just another ecumenical council, albeit a "pastoral" one that took place during the embarrassing but thankfully gone Age of Aquarius. It is understandable that the Vatican will not soon be ready to acknowledge that the council and its aftermath was a disaster. It is not even necessary to do so. Just let it fade into the past and get on with reasserting what has been always known to be true.

That requires, above all else, tolerance for those who continued to practice and live the faith as if the Beatles and their epoch never happened. Amnesty now for all the priests who refused to compromise during these years! Permit the Latin Mass and the old calendar to make a return! Provide for an unconditional restoration of the Society of St. Pius X back into the fold, along with every other independent group that chose faith over administrative obedience.

Third, massively beef up the Vatican website. Everything in the Vatican library should be online, from the first writings of the first Pope all the way to the present. Every letter, every papal bull, every catechism, every encyclical, the writings of the saints and martyrs, the libraries and libraries of theological and spiritual writings, and everything else that relates to Catholicism, including art works and rare manuscripts. Do it in .pdf and text files and do it now.

Where to get the money? Defund the Bishops' palaces and bureaucracies around the world. Uproot the Papal travel budget. A couple dozen Pontifical Councils on This and That could be abolished. Above all, gut the press office. These guys put out more words in one month than the Church did in the first 1500 years of Christianity!

So there's the agenda: check the power of Bishops, conveniently forget about Vatican 2, and spread information and truth again. Yes, that will require that the Pope curb his ambitions to become the world's most powerful force for political and social revolution. But when the pasture is burning, the first job is to save the sheep.
Reply
#2
(03-04-2013, 09:56 PM)GGG Wrote: Michael Voris The Next Pope and the Latin Mass
http://www.ChurchMilitant.TV/share/watch.php?vidID=vort-2013-03-04
 


And from the Lew Rockwell article, What the Next Pope Should Do
"So what should be the goal of the next Pope? To preserve and propagate the faith. In these times, there are at least three strategic imperatives. "
Comment: I don't follow Lew Rockwell but there's much to praise in this article.
Full article:
What the Next Pope Should Do

http://www.lewrockwell.com/rockwell/next-pope.html
by Llewellyn H. Rockwell, Jr.

It's presumptuous to address this topic, but since the web makes expansive punditry impossible to resist, I will anyway. Fortunately, the web has also made possible the Catholic Encyclopedia online (1917 edition), which used to be very difficult to find and expensive to own.

At last, persistent confusions on the question of the papacy can be clarified despite popular misconceptions (held by Catholics and non-Catholics). You can even read the entry on the Pope, along with a defense of the papacy against its detractors and a listing of its powers and responsibilities.

It turns out that the Pope, in addition to the pastoral duties required of every priest and Bishop, and the special duties and powers that come with being the Bishop of Rome, has only one primary job: to exercise "ordinary, immediate, and episcopal jurisdiction over all the faithful" toward the goal of "the preservation and the propagation of the faith." That is to say, the purpose of all the power of his office is to spread Catholicism (not his peculiar version but the unchanging faith as taught by the apostles and developed over two millennia) and protect it from error.

My, how far we've come. Nowadays, the Pope, when not being treated as a world media figure, is seen as an all-powerful spokesman for the Holy Spirit in all matters. But that has never been Church teaching: even the Pope's ex cathedra power of infallibility extends only to matters of faith and morals (not politics, economics, or administrative disciplines within the Church) and only insofar as he defines a teaching that can be shown to have always been taught.

The danger that comes with exaggerating the personal power and perfection of the Pope, or confusing doctrinal infallibility with personal impeccability is that it can so easily be shown to be contradicted by history, which is so clearly full of Popes who were personally compromised in one way or another.

The miracle of the Papacy is not that such great men have held the office (though many have); it is that no matter how bad things have been in the history of the Church, the core doctrine and moral system of the Catholic religion has never been falsely taught from the Chair of Peter in 2,000 years.

So what should be the goal of the next Pope? To preserve and propagate the faith. In these times, there are at least three strategic imperatives.

First, forget about politics and start protecting the Catholic faithful against the actions by the Bishops that have made it very difficult to be a Catholic in today's setting. Catholics expect attacks from the media and the government. They don't expect attacks from the local Bishop and his henchpeople. If the Vatican bothered to read the chilling weekly content of The Wanderer newspaper, it would have plenty of evidence that the Bishops are out of control.

Second, forget about treating Vatican II as the "new Pentecost" and start to regard it as just another ecumenical council, albeit a "pastoral" one that took place during the embarrassing but thankfully gone Age of Aquarius. It is understandable that the Vatican will not soon be ready to acknowledge that the council and its aftermath was a disaster. It is not even necessary to do so. Just let it fade into the past and get on with reasserting what has been always known to be true.

That requires, above all else, tolerance for those who continued to practice and live the faith as if the Beatles and their epoch never happened. Amnesty now for all the priests who refused to compromise during these years! Permit the Latin Mass and the old calendar to make a return! Provide for an unconditional restoration of the Society of St. Pius X back into the fold, along with every other independent group that chose faith over administrative obedience.

Third, massively beef up the Vatican website. Everything in the Vatican library should be online, from the first writings of the first Pope all the way to the present. Every letter, every papal bull, every catechism, every encyclical, the writings of the saints and martyrs, the libraries and libraries of theological and spiritual writings, and everything else that relates to Catholicism, including art works and rare manuscripts. Do it in .pdf and text files and do it now.

Where to get the money? Defund the Bishops' palaces and bureaucracies around the world. Uproot the Papal travel budget. A couple dozen Pontifical Councils on This and That could be abolished. Above all, gut the press office. These guys put out more words in one month than the Church did in the first 1500 years of Christianity!

So there's the agenda: check the power of Bishops, conveniently forget about Vatican 2, and spread information and truth again. Yes, that will require that the Pope curb his ambitions to become the world's most powerful force for political and social revolution. But when the pasture is burning, the first job is to save the sheep.


Thank you.
Reply
#3
(03-04-2013, 09:56 PM)GGG Wrote: Michael Voris The Next Pope and the Latin Mass
http://www.ChurchMilitant.TV/share/watch.php?vidID=vort-2013-03-04
 

This is a great video.  People need to understand that the traditional movement is a youth movement.  Younger people want the authentic, perennial faith.  They don't want a particular generation's baggage.
Reply
#4
[quote='GGG' pid='1151172' dateline='1362448581']
Michael Voris The Next Pope and the Latin Mass
http://www.ChurchMilitant.TV/share/watch.php?vidID=vort-2013-03-04
 

ITA: beautiful video. I do think I like this Voris guy quite much! (Does he put out something new every day?)
Reply
#5
(03-04-2013, 09:56 PM)GGG Wrote: Michael Voris The Next Pope and the Latin Mass
http://www.ChurchMilitant.TV/share/watch.php?vidID=vort-2013-03-04
 


And from the Lew Rockwell article, What the Next Pope Should Do

So there's the agenda: check the power of Bishops, conveniently forget about Vatican 2, and spread information and truth again. Yes, that will require that the Pope curb his ambitions to become the world's most powerful force for political and social revolution. But when the pasture is burning, the first job is to save the sheep.


I've been thinking what Rockwell has written here for a long time. Forget Ecumenicism & converting people into the faith UNTIL we are practicing the faith ourselves. When Vat. II made all of these changes, the Catholics were thrown into chaos. WITH NO INSTRUCTIONS OR ANSWERING OF QUESTIONS, our Churches were gutted, the nuns who had taught our schools.......selflessly & well...were gone. Many of our Catholic hospitals were gone & our Mass was "streamlined" into a banal, boring, dumbed-down facimiles of the True Mass. confession was called unnecessary unless you had sinned mortally. In one year, in my city, the nuns left our Catholic hospital &, as no one else wanted a not-for-profit hospital,so it was finally torn down. We lost our Catholic Orphanage, because again--- that order of nuns  disappeared.When the year 1970 rolled around,  there was not ONE nun left in a city that once had 9 parishes............the nuns were replaced by lay people who tried hard, but had families of their own to care for.. As one of our teaching nuns told me, "I didn't leave my order, my order left me".

I was 28 yrs. old, with 4 babies & it was hard enough on me. I watched the Communion rail cut into sections & parceled out like souvenirs of an historic building that has lost it's relevance. It devastated my parents & their generation. They tried for a long time & then just quit going to Mass. Though they had sent 5 children through the school, helped with all of the parish picnics, etc. NOT ONE PRIEST NOTICED THAT THEY WERE GONE. Their minds were on the "separated brethren".

At that point, the Church should have turned to & helped it's own people. It's a little late now, but better late than never.
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#6
JoniCath, thanks for that post. You and your family's experience lines up with other experiences I've heard from folks of those generations (I myself was not around then).  For a time when pastoral sensitivity was supposedly considered such a virtue, there appears to have been absolutely none of it.   Changes were made in draconian ways, churches that people sacrificed greatly for were torn up, sacred things were literally thrown in the trash, people who clung to traditional forms of piety were berated, etc.--all with no explanations or any compassion.  It's really heartbreaking.

In addition to what you mention about the lack of care for the flock and the focus on wooing those outside, I also think a lot of it had too do with an almost blind reliance on "experts" who had no actual experience or knowledge of actual pastoring.  I started a thread a while back here, where I posted a priest's experiences during that time period (the whole thing helped me to understand at least a little why this stuff happened).  He discusses often how pastors simply deferred to the "experts."  Here's an example:

Quote:Some bishops felt much more comfortable in a discussion with accountants
and heating contractors than they did with theologians. One of the finest
and kindest bishops I ever knew, who is now long dead, actually once said in
response to a religious question, "Don't ask me. I'm not much of a theolo-
gian." This is certainly not true of all the bishops, but I suspect it was true
of some. They were made to feel inadequate to the task by experts who were
only too glad to tell them what to think and sweeping changes were made
because, "Well, this is what the experts are telling us." This is evident in
the architecture of the time.

Experts decided that churches be trashed, and Communion rails were ripped
out and Formica replaced marble. I know a contractor who told me once that
his family had prospered first by pulling all the old stuff out, and then putting
it all back in. They just had to wait until the next wave of experts weighed
in. The bishops who had been so good with brick and mortar were made to
feel absolutely unsure about the tradition of the Church.
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#7
(03-05-2013, 07:27 AM)ImpyTerwilliger Wrote:
(03-04-2013, 09:56 PM)GGG Wrote: Michael Voris The Next Pope and the Latin Mass
http://www.ChurchMilitant.TV/share/watch.php?vidID=vort-2013-03-04
 

This is a great video.  People need to understand that the traditional movement is a youth movement.  Younger people want the authentic, perennial faith.  They don't want a particular generation's baggage.

This sums me up.  I am 27 years old and I feel like Vatican II and the subsequent upheaval launched in its name was a calamity for my generation and the preceding one.  If it hadn't been for the Tridentine Mass which my wife introduced me to two years ago while we were in the beginning stages of our courtship, I would not be where I am today in relation with the Faith.  I am discovering more and more about the Church and its rich history.  Perennial is right!
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#8
(03-05-2013, 02:40 PM)Stu Cool Wrote:
(03-05-2013, 07:27 AM)ImpyTerwilliger Wrote:
(03-04-2013, 09:56 PM)GGG Wrote: Michael Voris The Next Pope and the Latin Mass
http://www.ChurchMilitant.TV/share/watch.php?vidID=vort-2013-03-04
 

This is a great video.  People need to understand that the traditional movement is a youth movement.  Younger people want the authentic, perennial faith.  They don't want a particular generation's baggage.

This sums me up.  I am 27 years old and I feel like Vatican II and the subsequent upheaval launched in its name was a calamity for my generation and the preceding one.  If it hadn't been for the Tridentine Mass which my wife introduced me to two years ago while we were in the beginning stages of our courtship, I would not be where I am today in relation with the Faith.  I am discovering more and more about the Church and its rich history.  Perennial is right!

Yay! You youngsters lead the charge! We've got your back.  Smile
Lynne

+JMJ+

"Certainly, you must be informed about modern errors because preaching the truth involves preaching about distancing oneself from error; but do not make the negative, secondary aspect into the most important! Your first aim is not to fight against error but to know the truth. Your central concern should be study, your sanctification, silence, meditation, and the exercise of charity." - Archbishop Lefebvre
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#9
The opposition strategy changed from outright hostility to now thinking they contain us (and exploit us). They give us Churches falling apart or in the most hostile neighborhoods, parishes with mounds of debt and are slated to be closed. Yet city after city, the result are nearly the same. A parish is saved, a Church reinvigorate, and yet they won't see it nor admit it, the pride is so very great. They dismiss it for nostalgia, well I wasn't born till the mid-80s so it ain't nostalgia for me.  I wasn't born into a Leave it to Beaver family but an extremely dysfunctional one.  The TLM is the only place where I see other males my own age, many of whom are not married, there is an abundance of children as well mixed into the crowds.  And while I do think the Novus Ordo has a future in the Church, albeit in a diminished and slightly different forml.  The future of the Latin Rite is surprise, surprise comes from its past contrary to the claims of Pope Weigel I.  The Ordinary can ignore our prayers, but God doesn't. 

 
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#10
What the next Pope should do? Abolish the Novus Disordo and replace it with the Mass of All Time.
Oh yes, also revoke the Pact of Metz, still in effect, and consecrate Russia to the Immaculate Heart of Mary once and for all.
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