The Next Pope / Latin Mass ... What the new Pope Should Do
#11
(03-05-2013, 03:37 PM)Montgisard Wrote: What the next Pope should do? Abolish the Novus Disordo and replace it with the Mass of All Time.
Oh yes, also revoke the Pact of Metz, still in effect, and consecrate Russia to the Immaculate Heart of Mary once and for all.
The Mass of all time? You know that the Byzantine Liturgy is older than the TLM, right?
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#12
The thing is, the last 50 years in the life of the Church is a blip on the radar but for the individuals that have lived through this still as yet unending crisis it is most of their lives. There is both tragedy and hope in what I said above. In truth it is hard on the ground to talk about anything being "perennial" anymore in the Latin Rite when there has been a sharp break with the traditions of the past perpetrated on the faithful by the leadership of the Church itself. That is devestating, absolutely devastating. There is a reason so many not only lost their faith they nearly lost their minds. All of a sudden the institution you thought was timeless and immovable just jettisoned nearly everything in a matter of decades with the seeming blessing of the Pope, the one who, at least in the Catholic mind, was supposed to guard the faith. All of a sudden this rock solid religious belief that seem to be built on such firm foundations was swept away like a sand castle caught in a massive wave long before high tide. I can't imagine the sense of betrayal and loss that must have been like I imagine some nearly went crazy because they had nothing left to hold on to. If the Catholic Church could collapse like that than what, if anything, was true, not the least of all the Catholic Church? As an aside I remember once reading the story of a former Catholic turned Western Rite Orthodox with ROCOR talking about how Vatican II in his mind overturned the Church of Pius XII and made it absolutely clear to him that Rome was not the true Church. This is the stuff that can happen.


The good news is that it seems like the Church is slowly recovering from this. The only thing we can do is walk on through this darkness and believe almost against what our thoughts are telling us that indeed the Catholic Church is the True Church and for some reason we have been given the grace (strange grace I know!) to live through this, the most dark time in the history of the Roman Catholic Church. In the long life of the Church this last 50 years has been hardly any time at which should give us not just some sense of hope but an incentive to honestly take the long view of things. Those who kept the Faith in this crisis will be considered heros to later generations who only read about it in the history books. This crisis will not be resolved in full till long, long after most of us in this forum are long dead and buried and hopefully enjoying the light and love of Heaven. Despite that we are right now rebuilding the faith, starting with our own familes and chapels and communities.
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#13
(03-05-2013, 02:40 PM)Stu Cool Wrote:
(03-05-2013, 07:27 AM)ImpyTerwilliger Wrote:
(03-04-2013, 09:56 PM)GGG Wrote: Michael Voris The Next Pope and the Latin Mass
http://www.ChurchMilitant.TV/share/watch.php?vidID=vort-2013-03-04
 

This is a great video.  People need to understand that the traditional movement is a youth movement.  Younger people want the authentic, perennial faith.  They don't want a particular generation's baggage.

This sums me up.  I am 27 years old and I feel like Vatican II and the subsequent upheaval launched in its name was a calamity for my generation and the preceding one.  If it hadn't been for the Tridentine Mass which my wife introduced me to two years ago while we were in the beginning stages of our courtship, I would not be where I am today in relation with the Faith.  I am discovering more and more about the Church and its rich history.  Perennial is right!



Stu, You're right. Your generation & the one before you have also been cheated.. My 4 children are age 45, 48, 49 & 51. Their Catechesis was horrible. We tried, but we were so confused at that time........I can't tell you how many times I heard, "Well, that's not what Mrs.__________said". I began to feel ill-equipped to teach my own children the faith as I had learned it. I was hoping that my nieces & nephews (your age) would be taught the faith of the ages. They weren't, even those who attended Catholic schools. The confusion now will be passed onto my Grandchildren.  Monstrance
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#14
(03-05-2013, 07:30 PM)JoniCath Wrote: The confusion now will be passed onto my Grandchildren. 

That need not be.  Why don't you send them these:  http://www.baroniuspress.com/category.php?wid=63&cid=6

[Image: 40-309.jpg][Image: 41-311.jpg][Image: 42-313.jpg]
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#15
(03-05-2013, 07:30 PM)JoniCath Wrote:
(03-05-2013, 02:40 PM)Stu Cool Wrote: This sums me up.  I am 27 years old and I feel like Vatican II and the subsequent upheaval launched in its name was a calamity for my generation and the preceding one.  If it hadn't been for the Tridentine Mass which my wife introduced me to two years ago while we were in the beginning stages of our courtship, I would not be where I am today in relation with the Faith.  I am discovering more and more about the Church and its rich history.  Perennial is right!



Stu, You're right. Your generation & the one before you have also been cheated.. My 4 children are age 45, 48, 49 & 51. Their Catechesis was horrible. We tried, but we were so confused at that time........I can't tell you how many times I heard, "Well, that's not what Mrs.__________said". I began to feel ill-equipped to teach my own children the faith as I had learned it. I was hoping that my nieces & nephews (your age) would be taught the faith of the ages. They weren't, even those who attended Catholic schools. The confusion now will be passed onto my Grandchildren.  Monstrance

I'm one of those of the generation before.  I'm 40+ and have only learned about my faith in the last 15 years.  I have so much more to learn.  I do hope the next pope is strong enough to fix this mess.  I think B16 had the way but not the will. 
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#16
I resent the idea of Traditional Catholicism being a movement.

It is a stance.  It is believing that the first 1960 years of Church Teaching were true.  And sticking with that.  Trads aren't doing anything new.  There is no movement, we have not changed.  The movement is that of the Novus Ordo.  It came up out of Hell and is moving all about us.  Cui resístite fortes in fide!

More Catholic Discussion: http://thetradforum.com/

Go thy ways, old Jack;
die when thou wilt, if manhood, good manhood, be
not forgot upon the face of the earth, then am I a
shotten herring. There live not three good men
unhanged in England; and one of them is fat and
grows old: God help the while! a bad world, I say.
I would I were a weaver; I could sing psalms or any
thing. A plague of all cowards, I say still.
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#17
(03-06-2013, 01:30 AM)Mithrandylan Wrote: I resent the idea of Traditional Catholicism being a movement.

This is a great video.  People need to understand that the traditional stance is a youth stance.  Younger people want the authentic, perennial faith.  They don't want a particular generation's baggage.
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#18
(03-06-2013, 11:53 AM)ImpyTerwilliger Wrote:
(03-06-2013, 01:30 AM)Mithrandylan Wrote: I resent the idea of Traditional Catholicism being a movement.

This is a great video.  People need to understand that the traditional stance is a youth stance.  Younger people want the authentic, perennial faith.  They don't want a particular generation's baggage.

It will indeed be the younger generations that will rebuild the Church but it will also take time since it will have to be the younger generations that eventually become bishops, archibishops and cardinals that can do it with authority. Vatican II and its rotten fruit needs to be overturned not just from the bottom up but from the top down. We are still at a point in the crisis where many in positions of power and influence cannot see beyond Vatican II and trying to salvage it. These men have to either have a major change of heart and mind about things or we must wait till they die and younger more traditional men take their places, men with no stake whatsoever in Vatican II and trying to save it. Any way you cut it the resolution of this crisis somehow stands or falls with Vatican II and what if anything is to be done about it. I can't see how the Church can completely toss it into the dustbin of history without completely discrediting herself but by the same token I'm not sure how to salvage it. This is what is so hard about this crisis and why I think Benedict XVI proceeded with much more caution than many of us would have liked.
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