My opinion about Pope Francis
#11
(03-14-2013, 02:52 PM)ggreg Wrote: I am not sad.

I am happy.

I wanted a liberal, socialist and ecumaniac.

The worse it gets the closer we are to the finish.

Amen.

A 'reformer' pope (as Ratzinger was purported to be) can only get new siding, put on a spare bedroom and replace the shingles of a worn down house.  But that's not going to do anything when the very foundation of it is cracked and crumbling, it's simply delaying the inevitable.  You need a wrecking ball or an earth quake to bring the whole house down, and then an architect pope to build it back up again.  Here's hoping that Francis is the wrecking ball.
More Catholic Discussion: http://thetradforum.com/

Go thy ways, old Jack;
die when thou wilt, if manhood, good manhood, be
not forgot upon the face of the earth, then am I a
shotten herring. There live not three good men
unhanged in England; and one of them is fat and
grows old: God help the while! a bad world, I say.
I would I were a weaver; I could sing psalms or any
thing. A plague of all cowards, I say still.
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#12
I don't understand.  I thought the TLM was the only Roman rite until around 1970, when the NO caused people to leave the Church in droves.  How did the TLM become a white thing in Argentina in just 40 years?
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#13
Haha I'm tired of stupid Americans that think anyone with a Spanish last name is not white. Argentina has the highest population of whites in South America. I think the last research results showed 97% were white. As pointed out, Argentina is mostly populated by Italian and Spanish (as in Spain) immigrants. There is also a pretty big German population. Argentina also happens to be the most racist country in South America.
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#14
Well, I don't think people here sees the TLM as a "white thing". Most people don't remember about the Traditional Mass, and think the NO is just a translated version.

Maybe some liberals see Latin as something Medieval, or befitting of the Opus Dei (that fills the place of a media fabricated boogeyman in many countries), or classicist.
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#15
(03-14-2013, 03:33 PM)eduardo Wrote: It's true, Latin America is very different to the US, but Buenos Aires is different to the rest of Latin America, too.

This.

Also, Latin Americans in the US have a different outlook from Latin Americans in their home countries. (I realize Burdensome1 also spoke of the latter group.) For instance, I do not think of "whites" as being a distinct group from us, and I'm brown. . .

Now, let's substitute white with "gringo", which would be a more apt comparison. The notion that saying Mass in Latin is a gringo thing strikes me as totally absurd. Latin is closer to Spanish (and Portuguese) than English. And more importantly, everyone knows all gringos are Protestant!

My own outlook may be different from other Latin Americans, though, because I went to a Protestant school. Thus, the first time I saw liturgical dance in Mass, it made me very uncomfortable because it struck me as Protestant (I had seen it first at chapel in my school).

I've seen some bad liturgical shenanigans back home, but the video from the Children's Mass with then-Abp. Bergoglio was something else. The liturgical abuses I've seen are tacky spectacles; that Mass had the air of a festival for children that happened to have an Eucharistic Prayer embedded in it.

Let us not forget that liturgical liberalism, or a lack of appreciation for the beautiful, is itself erroneous thinking and cause for concern.

edit:
(03-14-2013, 09:36 PM)Cesar_Augustus Wrote: Most people don't remember about the Traditional Mass, and think the NO is just a translated version.

I had written several incoherent lines trying to say this. Mariachi Masses are "traditional" because Mariachis are traditional (from a pop music point of view) and wear spiffy outfits. People don't have a special hostility to tradition - they just don't know there was a break with it, and when they hear about the TLM they panic about the Latin.
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#16
I don't think the new Pope has spoke one word in Latin since he has been Pope. Everything that I hear has him speaking in Italian. But this is what you get when the lavender mafia elects the Pope.
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#17
(03-14-2013, 09:51 PM)Petertherock Wrote: I don't think the new Pope has spoke one word in Latin since he has been Pope. Everything that I hear has him speaking in Italian. But this is what you get when the lavender mafia elects the Pope.

He certainly has spoken in Latin. His first Mass was in Latin.
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#18
(03-14-2013, 03:33 PM)eduardo Wrote: Burdensome, let me make a brief remark. The portrait you did may apply for many Latin American Dioceses; it even goes well for my own Diocese (Salta city, in the Argentinean NorthWest), but Buenos Aires is a very different city. More european than any of others cities in South America, B.A. is much closer to an Italian or even Spanish city; plenty of children and little children of Italian and Spanish immigrants. Moreover, one of the largest Traditionalist Communities in the world live in Buenos Aires or near that big city (SSPX has a Seminar in La Reja, a few kms from Bs As). It's true, Latin America is very different to the US, but Buenos Aires is different to the rest of Latin America, too.


I read a long time ago, that Buenos Aires was like the Paris of South America. That people were very well educated,
they enjoyed the Opera, very cultured, etc. And that most people were children of Italian, Spanish, Jewish,
German immigrants. And that it looked very different compared to places like Bolivia, Ecuador.That Buenos Aires
had a European feel to it. And in recent years, I read that it also had a strong following of the Latin Mass. But, I never
understood why the FSSP or the Institute are not there at all??? ???

Eduardo, could you please elaborate more on that. :)
Thank you & God bless you. Pax.
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#19
(03-14-2013, 09:53 PM)DeoGratias72 Wrote: I read a long time ago, that Buenos Aires was like the Paris of South America. That people were very well educated,
they enjoyed the Opera, very cultured, etc. And that most people were children of Italian, Spanish, Jewish,
German immigrants. And that it looked very different compared to places like Bolivia, Ecuador.That Buenos Aires
had a European feel to it. And in recent years, I read that it also had a strong following of the Latin Mass. But, I never
understood why the FSSP or the Institute are not there at all??? ???

Eduardo, could you please elaborate more on that. :)
Thank you & God bless you. Pax.

You should write more!

Yes, Buenos Aires is often called "El París de América".

I hope eduardo tells us more about what he knows too, but in the mean time, there is this Rorate article: http://rorate-caeli.blogspot.com/2013/03...d-and.html
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#20
(03-14-2013, 09:56 PM)m.PR Wrote:
(03-14-2013, 09:53 PM)DeoGratias72 Wrote: I read a long time ago, that Buenos Aires was like the Paris of South America. That people were very well educated,
they enjoyed the Opera, very cultured, etc. And that most people were children of Italian, Spanish, Jewish,
German immigrants. And that it looked very different compared to places like Bolivia, Ecuador.That Buenos Aires
had a European feel to it. And in recent years, I read that it also had a strong following of the Latin Mass. But, I never
understood why the FSSP or the Institute are not there at all??? ???

Eduardo, could you please elaborate more on that. :)
Thank you & God bless you. Pax.

You should write more!

Yes, Buenos Aires is often called "El París de América".

I hope eduardo tells us more about what he knows too, but in the mean time, there is this Rorate article: http://rorate-caeli.blogspot.com/2013/03...d-and.html


When I was growing up, we had an Argentinian family live next door to us. They mentioned how a lot of
people from different parts of South America would travel to Buenos Aires for the Opera, that it was
the best in South America. I was also told how they had the best restaurants, steaks in all of South
America :grin:  A relative of mine who is a "foodie" would travel there on business & said that he felt like
he was a sinner because he enjoyed the food in Argentina too much :grin: He said that it was even better
than anything he had tasted in NYC, San Francisco or Chicago... He also said that the Architecture, Churches
were really beautiful. After listening to so many stories, I have always had a desire to visit. If the FSSP or Institute
were there, I would not mind living there for at least 1 or 2 years  :grin: Not sure, what their economy is like right now....
Thanks for your post :) God bless.
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