Francis gives Apostolic Blessing "silently" so as not to offend
#51
I can't remember which pope did this (Leo XII or Pius X I believe) but a pre conciliar pope was meeting with some Anglicans, who, at the end of the meeting asked him for a blessing.  The pope said that he wouldn't give them a blessing because they were presisting in heresy, and they said 'there must be something you can do!'  So the Holy Father gave them the blessing for incense at high mass.

Francis blessed them 'silently' so as not to offend their sensibilities.  That's erroneous.  It's like refusing a heretic communion because he's wearing a grey suit-- not quite, but you get the point.  Perhaps someone more learned on the nature of apostolic blessings can give some more insight.
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#52
Argh!  Beat me by a few seconds!  Ah, well, I'll post anyway.

Actually, I believe that in the past, blessings were never given out to non-Catholics.  There is the old story of one of the popes praying the incense blessing over a protestant minister after the man requested a blessing from him.  I didn't spend much time searching but I did find one vague reference.

Excerpt from Tradition in Action

Although my memory of the pope may be incorrect (I believe it was Pope Pius XI), there is the story that a protestant minister came to him in audience and requested a blessing. The pope gave him the following blessing: "Ab illo benedicaris in cuius honore cremaberis. Amen." The priests in attendance had to suppress their amusement.

The minister being ignorant of Latin did not know that the pope had used the blessing of incense for the requested blessing of the protestant: "Mayest thou be blessed by Him in Whose honor thou art to be burnt. Amen."
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#53
(03-16-2013, 05:20 PM)Mithrandylan Wrote: I can't remember which pope did this (Leo XII or Pius X I believe) but a pre conciliar pope was meeting with some Anglicans, who, at the end of the meeting asked him for a blessing.  The pope said that he wouldn't give them a blessing because they were presisting in heresy, and they said 'there must be something you can do!'  So the Holy Father gave them the blessing for incense at high mass.

Francis blessed them 'silently' so as not to offend their sensibilities.  That's erroneous.  It's like refusing a heretic communion because he's wearing a grey suit-- not quite, but you get the point.  Perhaps someone more learned on the nature of apostolic blessings can give some more insight.

Alas, there is no account of this story before the 2000s. 
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#54
Here is a full transcript of the audience:

Quote:Dear Friends,

At the beginning of my ministry in the See of Peter, I am pleased to meet all of you who have worked here in Rome throughout this intense period which began with the unexpected announcement made by my venerable Predecessor Benedict XVI on 11 February last. To each of you I offer a cordial greeting.

The role of the mass media has expanded immensely in these years, so much so that they are an essential means of informing the world about the events of contemporary history. I would like, then, to thank you in a special way for the professional coverage which you provided during these days – you really worked, didn’t you? – when the eyes of the whole world, and not just those of Catholics, were turned to the Eternal City and particularly to this place which has as its heart the tomb of Saint Peter. Over the past few weeks, you have had to provide information about the Holy See and about the Church, her rituals and traditions, her faith and above all the role of the Pope and his ministry.

I am particularly grateful to those who viewed and presented these events of the Church’s history in a way which was sensitive to the right context in which they need to be read, namely that of faith. Historical events almost always demand a nuanced interpretation which at times can also take into account the dimension of faith. Ecclesial events are certainly no more intricate than political or economic events! But they do have one particular underlying feature: they follow a pattern which does not readily correspond to the “worldly” categories which we are accustomed to use, and so it is not easy to interpret and communicate them to a wider and more varied public. The Church is certainly a human and historical institution with all that that entails, yet her nature is not essentially political but spiritual: the Church is the People of God, the Holy People of God making its way to encounter Jesus Christ. Only from this perspective can a satisfactory account be given of the Church’s life and activity.

Christ is the Church’s Pastor, but his presence in history passes through the freedom of human beings; from their midst one is chosen to serve as his Vicar, the Successor of the Apostle Peter. Yet Christ remains the centre, not the Sucessor of Peter: Christ, Christ is the centre. Christ is the fundamental point of reference, the heart of the Church. Without him, Peter and the Church would not exist or have reason to exist. As Benedict XVI frequently reminded us, Christ is present in Church and guides her. In everything that has occurred, the principal agent has been, in the final analysis, the Holy Spirit. He prompted the decision of Benedict XVI for the good of the Church; he guided the Cardinals in prayer and in the election.

It is important, dear friends, to take into due account this way of looking at things, this hermeneutic, in order to bring into proper focus what really happened in these days.

All of this leads me to thank you once more for your work in these particularly demanding days, but also to ask you to try to understand more fully the true nature of the Church, as well as her journey in this world, with her virtues and her sins, and to know the spiritual concerns which guide her and are the most genuine way to understand her. Be assured that the Church, for her part, highly esteems your important work. At your disposal you have the means to hear and to give voice to people’s expectations and demands, and to provide for an analysis and interpretation of current events. Your work calls for careful preparation, sensitivity and experience, like so many other professions, but it also demands a particular concern for what is true, good and beautiful. This is something which we have in common, since the Church exists to communicate precisely this: Truth, Goodness and Beauty “in person”. It should be apparent that all of us are called not to communicate ourselves, but this existential triad made up of truth, beauty and goodness.

Some people wanted to know why the Bishop of Rome wished to be called Francis. Some thought of Francis Xavier, Francis De Sales, and also Francis of Assisi. I will tell you the story. During the election, I was seated next to the Archbishop Emeritus of São Paolo and Prefect Emeritus of the Congregation for the Clergy, Cardinal Claudio Hummes: a good friend, a good friend! When things were looking dangerous, he encouraged me. And when the votes reached two thirds, there was the usual applause, because the Pope had been elected. And he gave me a hug and a kiss, and said: “Don't forget the poor!” And those words came to me: the poor, the poor. Then, right away, thinking of the poor, I thought of Francis of Assisi. Then I thought of all the wars, as the votes were still being counted, till the end. Francis is also the man of peace. That is how the name came into my heart: Francis of Assisi. For me, he is the man of poverty, the man of peace, the man who loves and protects creation; these days we do not have a very good relationship with creation, do we? He is the man who gives us this spirit of peace, the poor man … How I would like a Church which is poor and for the poor! Afterwards, people were joking with me. “But you should call yourself Hadrian, because Hadrian VI was the reformer, we need a reform…” And someone else said to me: “No, no: your name should be Clement”. “But why?” “Clement XV: thus you pay back Clement XIV who suppressed the Society of Jesus!” These were jokes. I love all of you very much, I thank you for everything you have done. I pray that your work will always be serene and fruitful, and that you will come to know ever better the Gospel of Jesus Christ and the rich reality of the Church’s life. I commend you to the intercession of the Blessed Virgin Mary, Star of Evangelization, and with cordial good wishes for you and your families, each of your families. I cordially impart to all of you my blessing. Thank you.

(In Spanish)

I told you I was cordially imparting my blessing. Since many of you are not members of the Catholic Church, and others are not believers, I cordially give this blessing silently, to each of you, respecting the conscience of each, but in the knowledge that each of you is a child of God. May God bless you!

http://www.vatican.va/holy_father/france...ia_en.html
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#55
[quote='Parmandur' pid='1157030' dateline='1363461761']
But a Catholic is in communion with the Pope.  Full stop.
[/quote]

Not according to the definition used at FE:

[quote='FE Main Site']Traditional Catholics fall into three main categories:


The first and by far the largest group consists of those Catholics who accept the acclaimed Pope and his recent predecessors as true Popes and who believe that the Second Vatican Council was a valid, albeit problematic, Council. In this group are included:

those who attend parishes where Masses are offered in accordance with Pope Benedict XVI's Motu Proprio "Summorum Pontificum", most often celebrated by priests of the Fraternal Society of St Peter (F.S.S.P.) or the Institute of Christ the King (I.C.K), and

those who attend chapels or oratories where Masses are offered by priests of the Priestly Society of St. Pius X (S.S.P.X.) 4 and other such priestly fraternities outside of ordinary diocesan structures.

The second group consists of those who are unsure about the status of the acclaimed Pope. Many such Catholics worship at Masses offered by the Society of Saint Pius V (S.S.P.V.).

The third group consisists of "sedevacantist" Catholics, that is Catholics who believe that the Catholic Church has not had a true Pope for some time (most consider Pope Pius XII as the last true Pope) and who, depending on the time they see as the moment the "Chair of Peter" (sede) became empty (vacante), may or may not see Vatican II as a valid Council. Many sedevacantists attend Masses offered by the Congregation of Mary Immaculate Queen (C.M.R.I.). 5
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#56
(03-16-2013, 11:46 AM)LaramieHirsch Wrote:
(03-16-2013, 11:24 AM)BrendanD Wrote: At his audience with the members of the media this am, the pope imparted his Apostolic Blessing in silence out of "respect" for the non-Catholics and atheists present:

He imparted his apostolic blessing, however, in silence – out of respect, he said, for the fact that “not everyone present belongs to the Catholic faith and others do not believe.” “I respect the conscience of each one of you”, he said, “knowing that each one of you is a Child of God.May God bless you”.

My source? It's straight from the Vatican, folks: http://www.news.va/en/news/pope-francis-...a-and-name

Amazing!  He is so humble!  Don't you think he expresses the best humility?  What leadership!  Clearly, someone to look up to!  We are such bastards!  I love our humble pope!

please change your avatar, it makes me want to ignore your posts!  :)
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#57
I look it at this way, why waste a good blessing on nonCatholics and heretics! :grin:
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#58
John 12.

[1] Jesus therefore, six days before the pasch, came to Bethania, where Lazarus had been dead, whom Jesus raised to life. [2] And they made him a supper there: and Martha served: but Lazarus was one of them that were at table with him. [3] Mary therefore took a pound of ointment of right spikenard, of great price, and anointed the feet of Jesus, and wiped his feet with her hair; and the house was filled with the odour of the ointment. [4] Then one of his disciples, Judas Iscariot, he that was about to betray him, said: [5] Why was not this ointment sold for three hundred pence, and given to the poor?

[6] Now he said this, not because he cared for the poor; but because he was a thief, and having the purse, carried the things that were put therein. [7] Jesus therefore said: Let her alone, that she may keep it against the day of my burial. [8] For the poor you have always with you; but me you have not always. [9] A great multitude therefore of the Jews knew that he was there; and they came, not for Jesus' sake only, but that they might see Lazarus, whom he had raised from the dead. [10] But the chief priests thought to kill Lazarus also: [11] Because many of the Jews, by reason of him, went away, and believed in Jesus.
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#59
Sounds like the Pope actually blessed them 3 times in the full speech posted above, and he entrusts them to the Blessed Virgin Mary star of Evangelization.
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#60
(03-16-2013, 05:25 PM)Someone1776 Wrote:
(03-16-2013, 05:20 PM)Mithrandylan Wrote: I can't remember which pope did this (Leo XII or Pius X I believe) but a pre conciliar pope was meeting with some Anglicans, who, at the end of the meeting asked him for a blessing.  The pope said that he wouldn't give them a blessing because they were presisting in heresy, and they said 'there must be something you can do!'  So the Holy Father gave them the blessing for incense at high mass.

Francis blessed them 'silently' so as not to offend their sensibilities.  That's erroneous.  It's like refusing a heretic communion because he's wearing a grey suit-- not quite, but you get the point.  Perhaps someone more learned on the nature of apostolic blessings can give some more insight.

Alas, there is no account of this story before the 2000s. 

I heard the "ab illo benedicaris..." story in the '60s, and it was told about Pio Nono, who was quite a card.

Another anecdote: The Anglican bishop of Gibraltar, whose "jurisdiction" also extended over the Italian peninsula, went to an audience, and when he was introduced, Pio Nono greeted him with the words: "We understand that we are in your diocese."

What a guy!
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