Getting at weight loss from a different point of view
#1
I'm interested in discussing a  spiritually based weight loss program.  Immaculata mentioned a name once, I think it was the 'Light Weigh".  Since I have to look at everything related to weight loss as penances, and since Atkins or any drastic low carb diet is not practical for me at this point in life for many reasons, I was wondering if there was anyone who was taking the approach of eating like the saints did (according to our state of life, of course), eliminating the most unhealthy foods from our diet (which I think EVERYONE would agree is refined carbs; white bread, sugar, coffee, otherwise known as lifeblood, etc.)
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#2
I think just eating naturally produced foods, even if one is not super-strict, will help a lot.
 
Also, to eliminate processed sugar is key, but not naturally-occurring sugar.  I eat a lot of fruit, but my body can handle this sugar, as it is sugar made by the same God Who made my body and its digestive system.
 
I eat a lot of bread, too, but I stick to a particular kind - Ezekiel 4:9 (by Food for Life - www.foodforlife.com)  which is a bread made according to a recipe from the Bible.  It is very good, and it is very high in protein.  Imo, the key thing to do at the start is to simply cut out as much of the 'processed', modern junk as possible - but the Atkins-style diet is not healthy over the long haul, imo.   You would actually be better eating a plentiful supply of (raw) fruits and (raw) vegetables - they ought to play a large part in any diet.  Raw food has 'plenty of life' to give, so to speak - and it gives it to your body when you eat it.
 
I would also check out www.bragg.com.  There is much good info from the Braggs, although it is not without the occasional 'dogma-less humanitarian' reference, if you will.
 
Addendum: replace coffee with Mate (mah-tay), a South American tea that is really good (I drink it, adding unprocessed honey and raw apple cider vinegar).
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#3
The weight loss program was actually called "The Weigh Down Diet."  Although I lost 80 pounds with the book, and have kept more than half of it off for a couple of years, I wouldn't recommend the book, though, because it is Evangelical Protestant, and the author has publicly admitted that she doesn't believe in the Trinity -- the book is focused on Protestant ideology.  To lose the weight and apply the principles, I just literally had to skip sections of the book...
 
Let me just save everybody the trouble, and tell you what the main premise of the book is: it's a what is called a "hunger and fullness" method of weight loss,  which teaches people to monitor their physical signals of hunger and fullness, and stick to them -- it's just a remedy for gluttony.  Everyone who has a weight issue has fallen prey to gluttony, and anyone who tells you it isn't so is not being truthful.
 
Most people who overeat completely ignore true hunger and fullness symptoms and eat for emotional reasons.  The first half of the book teaches one to recognize physiological hunger. 
 
First, you fast for at least 24 hours, not eating unless you are absolutely positive you are truly physiologically hungry -- usually with a stomach ache, salivating, etc; during the 24 hours, one should not snack on anything, or drink any sugared beverage.  It would seem simple, but most of us are not eating when we are truly hungry.  The good news is that when you do experience true hunger, you can eat what you want, but controlling portions. Almost all Americans are eating several portions at one sitting...
 
The author encourages people to serve themselves one half to one serving of things, and that the plate should still be visible.  Also, one should eat slowly and deliberately, looking for a signal of fullness.  You'll notice that you are satisfied, no longer hungry (no tummy ache, salivating, eagerness), but one should never be stuffed are very full -- then stop immediately.  Cover your plate with a napkin (that's what I do), or throw it away.  There should always be a little food left on your plate. From this point on, you should be eating this way for good -- also, there is no snacking, or drinking sugared beverages, which confuse our bodies' signals.
 
A sample meal for me would be:
 
1 piece of fried chicken
1/2 serving of potato salad
1/2 roll
1/2 serving of macaroni and cheese
1/2 of a chocolate chip cookie
1 glass or more of water
 
A good way of beginning is to cut everything in half...
 
Another book that discusses the method is "Thin Within" which is non-denominational -- I'm not sure that I would recommend it, either...
 
 
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#4
Immaculata001 Wrote:


Everyone who has a weight issue has fallen prey to gluttony, and anyone who tells you it isn't so is not being truthful.



Thank you Immaculata for speaking this truth.  While it does seem to be true that I have a difficult time losing weight even when following a diet.  In the end I always fail because of gluttony... not "genes", or "hormones" or "glandular" problems.  I also get tired of the way that people tiptoe around this issue when advising me on weight-loss.  As if all I need is the right diet book or something.

Thanks for sharing the technique... I'll give it a try.  Are you supposed to deny yourself food completely in the first 24 hours?  Or is the idea just to eat sparingly, only when really hungry the first 24 hours?
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#5
miss_fluffy Wrote:Thanks for sharing the technique... I'll give it a try.  Are you supposed to deny yourself food completely in the first 24 hours?  Or is the idea just to eat sparingly, only when really hungry the first 24 hours?

 
I've read this book too, although I gained weight trying to do this (I'll explain why in a min) but her main thing when fasting for the first 24 is to get one to actually feel what physical hunger feels like because so many have forgotten. She says it can take up to 24 hours for some people and if you haven't felt that hunger yet to eat a small meal anyway, then wait again.
 
Another point she has is to eat what you crave, only though until you're "politely full" And this is probably why I gained weight on it: I craved pizza and donuts and thought "well, Gwen said I could!" So I would order pizza and eat the whole thing not at one sitting but maybe say over a 6 hour period. I felt hungry so I'd eat 2 slices; about 45 mins later, I'd feel hungry again and eat another slice, you get the idea. Maybe I wasn't stopping when I was full enough or something and that's why I kept going back? I found that to be the hardest part, knowing when to stop.
 
 
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#6
Quote:Another point she has is to eat what you crave, only though until you're "politely full" And this is probably why I gained weight on it: I craved pizza and donuts and thought "well, Gwen said I could!" So I would order pizza and eat the whole thing not at one sitting but maybe say over a 6 hour period. I felt hungry so I'd eat 2 slices; about 45 mins later, I'd feel hungry again and eat another slice, you get the idea. Maybe I wasn't stopping when I was full enough or something and that's why I kept going back? I found that to be the hardest part, knowing when to stop.

I have seen similar diet ideas, where one is encouraged to eat what one craves.  However, I have found that the "trick" to this is realizing what one really desires.  There was a time in my life when I seriously over-indulged in junk food.  However at the same time I was realizing that, if I ate the item slowly and tried to savour it, it really was not satisfying or appealing.  Either the item would briefly appeal to me (say, for a single serving or less worth of it, like 6 doughnut holes) or it would not appeal to me at all.  I would feel disgusted by it, yet I still had a craving for it.  It was like an addiction.

One must realize that alot of junk food is salted, sugared, and greased in order to make up for lack in taste and satisfaction otherwise.  Identifying one's body's true needs and desires is tricky.  I'm not sure I've nailed it down, and thats one reason I don't eat by craving.  The other being that I believe in self-discipline and objective focus.  Food is fuel, and may be a treat, but we shouldn't abuse it.

One must also realize that often hunger pains may simply be a sign of thirst.  Especially in the modern culture, people generally do not drink enough water.  This is exacerbated by overly salty diets, and foods that have had much of their water cooked away (or didn't have much to begin with).

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#7
Reading this, it occurred to me how prayer may help with the hunger and fullness signals.  Maybe when I think I'm physiologically hungry (and not thirsty instead)  I can pray on it, and ask for guidance about whether I'm really hungry.  And whenever I do eat, I can pray before I begin my meal for help in determining when I'm full. It seems like praying for healing w/regards to gluttony and asking for temperance along with each meal would do a great deal to change bad habits.
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#8
Re: the gluttony issue: that is kind of sortof true in my case (I say this after discussion with a spiritual director). 

Yes, now the continuation of my weight issues is in part due to gluttony (in part due to having a hard time controlling pain issues to where I can exercise), but it started due to 1. pregnancy and 2. stomach problems where all I could hold down was refined carbs.  Water made me vomit, but gatorade didn't, I could stomach saltine crackers but not bread...you get the idea. Just to say the "original cause" was not gluttony.
 
My mom gained 100 lbs. because when she first got diagnosed, they tried an experimental high level steroid treatment with her.  Since they thought she'd live 2 years, she didn't feel she had a whole lot to lose.
 
But I can't go on some "eat whatever you want as long as you leave out the "root of all evil" food" diet, whether it be Atkins or veganism (and I was a vegan for a while.
 
I'm not saying I'm perfectly innocent.  Sugar is like an addicton to me. 
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#9
I want to discuss the two things which you mention the above. The first thing is the use of the sugar. I want to mention that sugar products are really reason of the fat. And the use of the coffee is really helpful to burn the calories of the body.
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#10
This topic is so old, I think  I'm the only one who posted on it who is still a member of this forum.
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