Kudos to Holy Rosary Church in Indy
#1
On our way home from my father's funeral in NJ, we stopped off in Indianapolis so my wife could visit an extremely ill friend. I looked up Catholic churches from our hotel room, aiming for a Tridentine Mass as early in the AM as I could get. Holy Rosary church had one, but not as early as I needed it to be, since we had to be on the road no later than 10 in order to get home at a halfway reasonable hour. I noted on their schedule that an Anglican Use Mass was at 8, and this I thought would be better than a New Mass.

It was, indeed. The church was beautiful, the Mass was conducted very reverently, and for someone who had no experience whatsoever with anything Anglican up till that point, I was impressed with the traditional sense of holiness and respect paid during the entire Mass. For a Mass in the vernacular, the Anglican Use Mass was a lovely affair, and I can only imagine how beautiful the Tridentine Masses said at this church must be.

It also made me grateful for the progress in healing the rift between Anglicans and the Church that has been made, that there is this in place to help them back into the fold. I also appreciate a little more how a vernacular tongue can be used to express traditional and hence, noble and fitting, worship to the Lord--and also, how truly wonderful and edifying it is to have a universal, sacred language set apart for sacred use. It also made me a bit sad, since it also reinforced my feelings that a vernacular Tridentine Mass was the only logical option for a more easily-understood Mass, and that the New Mass was, and remains, absolutely unnecessary.

Regardless, kudos to Holy Rosary Church in Indy! From what little I've seen there, it was beautiful :)
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#2
(05-05-2013, 02:07 PM)Antonius Josephus Wrote: On our way home from my father's funeral in NJ, we stopped off in Indianapolis so my wife could visit an extremely ill friend. I looked up Catholic churches from our hotel room, aiming for a Tridentine Mass as early in the AM as I could get. Holy Rosary church had one, but not as early as I needed it to be, since we had to be on the road no later than 10 in order to get home at a halfway reasonable hour. I noted on their schedule that an Anglican Use Mass was at 8, and this I thought would be better than a New Mass.

It was, indeed. The church was beautiful, the Mass was conducted very reverently, and for someone who had no experience whatsoever with anything Anglican up till that point, I was impressed with the traditional sense of holiness and respect paid during the entire Mass. For a Mass in the vernacular, the Anglican Use Mass was a lovely affair, and I can only imagine how beautiful the Tridentine Masses said at this church must be.

It also made me grateful for the progress in healing the rift between Anglicans and the Church that has been made, that there is this in place to help them back into the fold. I also appreciate a little more how a vernacular tongue can be used to express traditional and hence, noble and fitting, worship to the Lord--and also, how truly wonderful and edifying it is to have a universal, sacred language set apart for sacred use. It also made me a bit sad, since it also reinforced my feelings that a vernacular Tridentine Mass was the only logical option for a more easily-understood Mass, and that the New Mass was, and remains, absolutely unnecessary.

Regardless, kudos to Holy Rosary Church in Indy! From what little I've seen there, it was beautiful :)

I have become a big proponent of exactly what you are talking about.  The Anglican Use liturgy is beautiful and in keeping with the best of Church tradition as well as making the Mass more easily understood, as you put it.  The Ordinary Form of the Roman Rite could learn much from this expression of the liturgy. 
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#3
I have met the priest there, Fr. Magiera (who has one of the best singing voices, by virtue of having been an opera singer in Europe for most of his life) and a couple I know goes there. The E.O. Mass there is beautiful--they do a lot of things in the European style, like kneeling only after the Sanctus is finished. They also ring the Church bells at the consecration, or did when I was there, anyways.
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