Recipes for Diabetic Folks
#11
(05-11-2013, 08:33 PM)Satori Wrote: Ooh, Tim, that sounds so good. Yes, that sounds like a fine meal to me, nutritionally speaking.

Don't eat the fake ice cream! Read what Zedta says above (and yes, Zedta, it is stevia -- and I think "Truvia" is a brand name for stevia -- but I've never cooked with it and know it can't be used exactly like sugar). You know those old-fashioned ice cream dishes like your mama or grandma probably had? The little pretty ones that could fit into the palm of your hand? THAT is a good serving size for ice cream. Real ice cream. Treat yourself to an old-fashioned-sized serving of real ice cream on Sunday after your main meal and you'll probably be all right. When I was pregnant and my midwife told me not to eat sugar (pregnant women's blood sugar can go crazy, similar to diabetics'), she said I could have ice cream as an occasional treat. It's full of good fat and protein, which helps balance out the rush of sugar. It's a much better dessert, health-wise, than cake or cookies.

And if anyone's interested, I'll post a delicious recipe I have for chocolate mousse. It's not specifically for diabetic folks, but it has very little sugar in it and is so rich and chocolatey. AND it tastes wonderful after it's been in the freezer for a couple of hours, like chocolate ice cream that angels might eat if they were lucky.

I'd love to see the recipe.

I'm not diabetic, but am looking at cutting sugar.  Lots of good ideas so far.
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#12
Thanks guys! I understand sweet potatoes are good for you, but can we eat regular white baked potatoes?
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#13
(05-15-2013, 01:07 PM)StrictCatholicGirl Wrote: Thanks guys! I understand sweet potatoes are good for you, but can we eat regular white baked potatoes?

You can eat anything you want to in moderation. White potatoes are not the best choice for a diabetic person, but there is no reason you can't ever have one, especially if you load it with protein-rich toppings.

In case you didn't know, you can fix a baked sweet potato with the same sort of things as a white baked potato and it tastes great. I know a lot of people associate sweet potatoes with toppings like brown sugar and cinnamon, but I love them with butter, sour cream, salt, broccoli. You should try a twice-baked sweet potato with sausage.
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#14
As promised, roasted green beans recipe:

Take the serving size you want of green beans and spread them on a baking sheet. (If you use frozen beans, be sure to thaw, drain, and pat dry beforehand as lots of moisture on the beans will keep them from roasting well.) Toss with enough olive oil to coat them and add salt to your taste (kosher salt is the best, in my opinion). Place them in the oven on 450 for ten minutes; toss again, then put in for another 10 minutes or until the beans are browned and crisp. (Not brown all over.) Best green beans ever.

I got this recipe from Penzey's. You can sign up for a free monthly catalog full of really good recipes, many of them appropriate for diabetics and others who want to eat healthier.
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#15
(05-15-2013, 01:07 PM)StrictCatholicGirl Wrote: Thanks guys! I understand sweet potatoes are good for you, but can we eat regular white baked potatoes?

Regular potatoes, like Russet's, are loaded with carbs. Most potatoes are anyway, but the little old red potato is blessed (from a diabetic's stance) with much lower carbs to weight ratio. You can eat a couple of small reds and have much less carb load than you'd see with the same amount of other potatoes. There is one other low-carb potato, but I haven't seen them in a while and I don't recall the name. They came out about the time of the revival of the Atkin's diet, which ain't so bad for diabetics either.
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#16
When I have smoked pork chops or ham I make sweet potatoes like this. I wash and stab the Potato all over with a fork wrap it in a paper towel then nuke it for 3-4 minutes. Let it cool and scoop out the potato, add butter and sucralose, mash and re nuke it when ready to eat.

2morrow I'm going to make Japanese cuccumbers. Peel 2 cuccumbers and slice, then a whole big vidalia peeled and sliced toss in a tupperware like thing. Boil 1 cup water and 1 cup cider vinegar then add sucralose to make it sweet and sour. Pour over the onions and cukes and stash in the icebox to cool. it's a tasty side dish with almost anything.

I used to make them for Ton Katsu as a side dish. But Ton Katsu needs a flour dredge and egg dip with Panko crumbs, then fried, and sliced and layed on a bed of lettuce.
Next you need Ton Katsu sauce (like a tasty Japanese Ketchup) and white rice, with Kim Chee to set it right.

tim
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#17
I have also sometimes found at the grocery store a "white" sweet potato that is less sweet and with a slightly mealier texture than regular sweet potatoes. Anyone know about the food value of these?

Re: cucumbers. I split a cucumber lengthwise twice, then chop, and toss with diced onion, chopped cilantro, chopped green apple, sunflower seeds, a little sour cream or plain yogurt, and a dash of lime juice for a refreshing salad.
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#18
Thanks, Satori, I'm Type 2.  I have a problem cooking diabetic healthy foods for one person, and I don't like to freeze no more than one other serving because I'll either forget or grow tired of it.  Any ideas for that?
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#19
(05-10-2013, 01:28 PM)StrictCatholicGirl Wrote: Thanks Satori! What an awesome idea! I'm putting this thread in my "favorites" to check back.
  How do you put a thread in "favorites?"  I can't find any directions on how.
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#20
(05-15-2013, 09:45 PM)AstroKitty Wrote: Thanks, Satori, I'm Type 2.  I have a problem cooking diabetic healthy foods for one person, and I don't like to freeze no more than one other serving because I'll either forget or grow tired of it.  Any ideas for that?

Everything I've mentioned so far can be made in any serving size, with the exception of soup. I don't even measure most of the time, I just eyeball a pile of green beans and try to figure how much is likely to be eaten at one meal. Then I adjust the amount of oil, salt, etc. to the amount of veg I'm preparing.

I guess it would even be possible to make soup for one, but it seems like a lot of stove-time for just one serving. But then, I like eating leftovers. My favorite breakfast is leftovers from the night before. So I wouldn't mind making a small pot of soup and eating it for a few meals.
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