Looks Like Mahoney Is At It Again...Will He Please Go Away!?
#1
Looks like Mahoney is at it again. He was limited in the scope of his practice by his replacement Archbishop Gomez, but in only 3 months, he's baaack!

He needs to be censured, by the POPE and put in a monastery somewhere where he can't see any children and do some repenting in earnest...or maybe he should just be excommunicated. If only...but no, he lives in luxury at the rectory of the church where his old Grade School is at St. Charles Borromeo, in North Hollywood, Ca. ( http://scbnh.com/ ) Msgr.  Gallagher must be chewing nails with him there! (I know Msgr. Gallagher...he's a long-time friend of the family's.)

This guy is looney tunes and a disgrace. His ideas are very much beyond even NO. He was the one who insisted the kneelers, for just one insult, be removed from his new Cathedral he had built. BTW: The old one was quite adequate and very traditional in architecture. I could go on, but it just makes me seethe even more. :realmad:

Here's the article:



latimes.com/news/local/la-me-mahony-20130510,0,2784486.story
latimes.com
After rebuke by archbishop, Cardinal Mahony takes higher profile
Stripped of public duties by Archbishop Jose Gomez over mishandling of clergy sex abuse cases, Mahony has begun what some call a rehabilitation tour.

By Teresa Watanabe and Harriet Ryan, Los Angeles Times

5:55 PM PDT, May 9, 2013
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When Archbishop Jose Gomez stripped his predecessor, Cardinal Roger Mahony, of public duties for mishandling clergy sex abuse cases, a church spokesman said the retired prelate's life would remain largely the same with one exception: confirmations.

No longer would Mahony preside at springtime rites in which teenagers receive the sacrament that marks full passage into the Catholic Church, the spokesman said.

But three months later, Mahony is back doing confirmations. Since Easter, he has officiated at eight services, including one last week in which he anointed more than 120 youths at a Wilmington parish.

His presence has caused controversy, with some parents threatening to pull their children from the liturgies and at least one parish priest asking that Mahony not attend. It has also raised questions about why Gomez's rebuke of Mahony, an unprecedented move that won him praise from victims and their supporters around the world, had so little lasting effect.

Gomez's January letter to the region's more than 4 million Catholics seemed to rule out any conspicuous place for Mahony in the archdiocese. Noting that the cardinal had "expressed his sorrow for his failure to fully protect young people entrusted to his care, " Gomez told the faithful, "Effective immediately, I have informed Cardinal Mahony that he will no longer have any administrative or public duties."

Rather than recede from the spotlight, however, Mahony has become more prominent. The March papal conclave made him an important figure in a major international story, a position he touted with frequent posts on Twitter and his personal blog. Since his return from Rome, he has advocated immigration reform, his signature issue, and embarked upon what some in the church are calling a "rehabilitation tour" to tell his side of the abuse story to fellow priests. The speeches have played to mixed reviews, with some clerics saying he has a right to defend his record and others all but rolling their eyes.

Under canon law, Gomez had no authority to punish Mahony — only the pope can sanction a cardinal — but he does control administrative assignments in his archdiocese, including the confirmation schedule, and his letter signaled a desire to use that power to limit Mahony's visibility.

"What he said [in the letter] was, 'I'm no longer going to let him act publicly on behalf of me,'" said Nicholas P. Cafardi, a canon law specialist at Duquesne University. In light of the confirmations, he said, "You can certainly deduce that [Gomez] has changed his mind."

Gomez declined to comment. A spokeswoman said it was Mahony who had canceled his confirmation schedule in January and Mahony who opted to resume it. The cardinal declined to respond to questions posed through the spokeswoman.

Approached by a reporter after the Wilmington service, Mahony indicated that he was unaware the church had ever said he would stop doing confirmations.

"That's news to me.... I've been doing them every week and I'm going to be doing them every week," he said, adding, "So go home."

Bishop Thomas Curry, Mahony's top aide for abuse cases in the 1980s, canceled his confirmation schedule this spring after parishioners protested. Cathryn Croall said she found it "wildly inappropriate" for Curry to officiate at her daughter's confirmation at St. Jude the Apostle Parish in Westlake Village.

"He took the side of the pedophile," Croall said. "To have him stand up before children and give them a sacrament just seemed absolutely absurd."

The archdiocese did not respond to questions about whether any of Mahony's scheduled confirmations had been canceled, but one priest said he told the church to let someone else handle the sacrament because Mahony's presence was not "helpful to students and families." Parents in other parishes have reached out to the Survivors Network of Those Abused by Priests for help replacing Mahony at confirmations, a representative of the group said.

At Sts. Peter and Paul in Wilmington, Jerry Zatarain said he and his wife had different reactions to Mahony confirming their son. "My wife didn't feel too good about it," said the Los Angeles public safety officer. "She said, 'Oh no, what is he doing here?' She wanted someone else." But Zatarain said he felt Mahony's mistakes were a product of the era, not the man. "During that time the church was different — it was just the culture," he said.

Conflicting signals about Mahony's status began almost immediately after Gomez released his letter on the archdiocese's website.

It was posted alongside personnel files of abuser priests the church was required to make public under a 2007 settlement with victims. The elaborate presentation — charts, a question and answer section and lengthy preface — suggested a carefully considered public relations strategy by Gomez, who took over in 2011, for dealing with abuse that occurred on his predecessors' watch.

Church observers assumed Mahony, who as a cardinal outranked Gomez, had consented to the reduced role, but what happened next suggested otherwise.

Within hours, a church's spokesman was phoning journalists with a clarification: Mahony remained "a priest in good standing" with full rights to celebrate Mass and the sacraments.

Still, he would not preside at confirmations, the spokesman said.

The next day, a church spokesman said Mahony was "reducing his public profile" voluntarily. The cardinal had taken it upon himself to cancel appearances, including confirmations, the spokesman said.

But at the very same hour, Mahony was mounting a high-profile defense. In an extraordinary open letter to Gomez posted on his blog, the cardinal struck an aggrieved tone. "Not once over these past years did you ever raise any questions about our policies, practices, or procedures" for abuse cases, he wrote.

Gomez subsequently released a statement he said was designed to clear up "confusion" in the media: "Cardinal Mahony has all the prerogatives and privileges of his standing as a cardinal of the Roman Catholic Church."

A high-ranking archdiocese official told a gathering of priests this spring that Mahony contacted the Vatican about Gomez's reprimand, according to one cleric at the meeting.

A Vatican spokesman declined to comment.

Any expectation that Mahony would assume a lower profile disappeared two weeks later with Pope Benedict XVI's resignation. While Gomez remained in Los Angeles, the cardinal headed to Rome to help pick the next leader of the church. Mahony's chatty blog posts and Tweets from Vatican City irritated some priests.

Several said they found Mahony's decision to speak about the abuse scandal at each of 20 regional deanery meetings this spring to be inappropriate. "It's almost as if he doesn't know he's retired," one said.

But Msgr. David O'Connell, a pastor at St. Michael's in South Los Angeles, said he welcomed the cardinal's planned presentation in his region later this month. "He feels there's a wrong perception with how the press is portraying his role," he said.

teresa.watanabe@latimes.com

harriet.ryan@latimes.com

Times special correspondent Tom Kington contributed to this report.

Copyright 2013, Los Angeles Times
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#2
"Cardinal Mahony has all the prerogatives and privileges of his standing as a cardinal of the Roman Catholic Church."

nuff said. that about clears it up. The bottom line is that cardinal Mahony is in good standing with the Church. If all we care about is jurisdiction and other legalisms Mahony is in and most traditionalists outside the FSSP and Diocesan TLM's are out, period, close the book.
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#3
From reading the story, one of the problems seems to be that Mahony outranks Gomez.  That seems bizarre to me since anyone living within a diocese should be subject to the local ordinary, but I guess Cardinals are a special case.  It will be interesting to see if Gomez gets tougher once he gets a red hat. I'm not optimistic, but then I'm known to be slightly cynical.
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#4
If anyone wonders what "collegiality" means in Vatican 2, now you know.
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#5
To folks like us Mahony is a disgrace but to a large section of the Church he is an untouchable rockstar.
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#6
(05-11-2013, 12:05 PM)formerbuddhist Wrote: To folks like us Mahony is a disgrace but to a large section of the Church he is an untouchable rockstar.

I wonder.  I'm suggesting that this has more to do with the college of cardinals rallying around one of their own.  They fought hard to break the oversight that the late Victorian popes imposed.  I doubt very much whether they are keen to let some iconoclast from the American west coast scupper the works over a sex scandal. 
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#7
Well at least in America he is a rockstar but perhaps in the larger scheme of things he is not.
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#8
Message here: It pays to support sodomite child molestation at least in one diocese.

You get all the perks none of the work.
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#9
(05-11-2013, 11:42 AM)DrBombay Wrote: From reading the story, one of the problems seems to be that Mahony outranks Gomez.  That seems bizarre to me since anyone living within a diocese should be subject to the local ordinary, but I guess Cardinals are a special case.  It will be interesting to see if Gomez gets tougher once he gets a red hat. I'm not optimistic, but then I'm known to be slightly cynical.

Sadly it's not going to happen.  Only the Pope can punish a cardinal, full stop.  The most we can hope for from +Gomez is that he wil actually do what he said he did and not allow Mahony to represent the Archdiocese in any way.

Of course, with all the talk of reform and change surrounding Pope Francis, perhaps he could boot Mahony from the College of Cardinals, ban him from celebrating Mass or the othe sacraments in public and confine him to a monastery (and shutting down his blog and Twitter account would be nice, too) .  Hey, someone has to be optimistic once in a while

-Steve
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#10
Yeah, it would be nice to see the Pope take the bull by the horns here, and bring Mahony to Rome to live a life of hidden silence with Cardinal Law....
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