Nobody is Crying
#1
Might_4_Right Wrote:Why are so many striving to bury the Church and raise up something new?

Nobody is crying
The greatest crisis of the Priesthood in the history of the Church
by New Catholic at 6/06/2013

If there were no more priests hardly anyone would be crying about it. This is the sad statement that we have to make.

We are witnessing the greatest crisis of the priesthood in the history of the Church. Entire countries in Europe are now without priests and all is hushed up. You do not even hear a single bishop raise the alarm, weeping with the faithful, asking everyone to pray intensely for priestly vocations and ordering fasting with ardent supplications that the Lord may have mercy on His people.

It is true, you will hear bishops and heads of curia describing the numbers of this dizzying drop in the presence of priests in the Church. You will hear them calmly - too calmly – drawing up a list of the information in a detached manner as if it were a situation to accept just as a matter of course - in fact, the chance for a new Church – more of the people.

In the coming years, in Italy, land of Christian antiquity, we will witness the disappearance of parishes and some [radical] changes, unthinkable even a few years ago, in the simplest structures of Catholicism, of parish communities, where Christian life was [once] natural for everyone. But the absolute majority of busy Catholics will pretend nothing is happening, because their pastors are already doing so.

It is a “ catastrophe”, an “earthquake” - but nobody is crying about it – there is a pretence that nothing is happening. There is a pretence that nothing is happening because the fairytale of the Council’s “springtime” must continue. Any historical verification and evidence of a crisis without precedent are denied.

And a less than Catholic-like future is being prepared for us.

“Restructuring” the organization of Christian communities is already being discussed, i.e. creating space for the lay people (as if they never had enough of it in these past years) and a new type of Christian faithful is being invented who will become the administrators in the parishes and will replace the priests. Lay faithful, duly “clericalized”, will maintain the churches and while waiting for a Mass, they, like adult Christians, will do the preaching of the Word...

...yet nobody is crying about it - nobody is praying and crying out to God.

[Image: pict_37_zps21fa575c.jpg]

Perhaps they are not crying out because someone has been preparing this upheaval in the Church for some years now. They have debased the Catholic priesthood, transforming priests from men of God into social workers for the community. They have reduced the breviary and prayer. They have imposed secular dress so that the priests are like everyone else. Priests were told to keep up with the times because the world was moving forward. They were also told not to stress their own importance, but to share their responsibilities with the faithful.

And the final blow: priests were given a Mass that has become the preparation for the catastrophe in the Church. No longer deep prayer; no longer adoration of God Who is present. There is no longer intimate union with the propitiatory sacrifice of Christ on the Cross, but, instead, there is a holy supper with the community. Everything is centered on man - not on God - and a lot of extenuating talk about building community. It is a Mass which is a constant coming and going of lay people on and off the altar, a training for that coming and going of ladies and gentlemen who will shortly be running our ex-parishes without priests.

With the “worldly” Mass, the universal priesthood of the lay faithful has been cultivated and its meaning twisted. The baptized are a priestly people inasmuch as they offer themselves in sacrifice, in union with Christ crucified, offering all of their life with Jesus. The faithful must sanctify themselves; this is the universal priesthood of the baptized. The faithful do not participate in the Holy Orders of the priesthood, which are of an other nature and conform to the Priesthood of Christ. It is through the Sacrament of Holy Orders that Christ renders Himself present in the grace of the sacraments. If there were no more priests, both the Church and the grace of the sacraments would come to an end.

Martin Luther and Protestantism did exactly this: they destroyed the Catholic priesthood by saying that everyone was a “priest”, underlining specifically the universal priesthood of the laity.

In the matter of restructuring parishes, things might end up like that.

It might have been different to confront this crisis with minds and hearts holding the priesthood in high esteem, with the knowledge that the priest is one of the greatest gifts for the Church and all people. But this has not been the case. The crisis will be dealt with after years of total confusion in the lives of the clergy; after years of being unaccustomed to daily Mass and Catholic doctrine. So the faithful will do without the priest. This is already happening. And when a priest arrives, they will not have a clue what to do with him, having become accustomed to the belief that the Lord will save them without priests and sacraments.

We think it is not right to pretend that nothing is happening.

This is the reason we are asking our faithful to pray fervently to the Lord, so that He will grant a lot of priests to His Church, as He once did.

Dear faithful, in this month of June, which is the time dedicated to Holy Orders, let us have the courage to ask for this grace, even with tears, to the Sacred Heart of Jesus and the Immaculate Heart of Mary.

And let us cling to the most precious gift of the Mass of all time – the Mass of Tradition. It is only this Mass that will give new priests to the Church of the Lord.

[Editorial: Radicati nella fede, June 2013, bulletin of the Catholic community of Domodossola and Vocogno, Diocese of Novara, Italy - Translation and tip: Contributor Francesca Romana]
Labels: The Church of Vatican II, The Priesthood of the New Testament, Vatican II at 50

Source: Rorate Caeli
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#2
:blah: :blah: :blah:Typical scare mongering crap from Rorate Blogspot.  Nothing new.
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#3
(06-06-2013, 12:06 PM)AxxeArp Wrote: :blah: :blah: :blah:Typical scare mongering crap from Rorate Blogspot.  Nothing new.

It's from a parish bulletin, if you'd pay attention. And this is exactly what scholars like Dr. John Senior, Drs. Dietrich and Alice Von Hildebrand, Michael Davies, and even men like Fr. Calvin Goodwin, FSSP (and others) have been saying, if you'd pay attention. It's exactly what Cardinal Ratzinger said in far more words, and reiterated as Pope Benedict XVI, if you'd pay attention.

It's what Abp. Marcel Lefebvre warned about, if you'd pay attention. It's exactly what I saw as a Protestant, and see creeping into the Catholic Church, because I pay attention.

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#4
If we really believed that Priests are so important to the life of the Church and to the salvation of souls, (which I hope we do believe) why doesn't the Holy Father call a state of emergency in the Church and request a 'draft' where every eligible young Catholic man (in good standing) between certain years present himself to a seminary for a one-year discernment.
If governments can do it for political reasons why can't the Church for reasons far more important.
I know it is a crazy idea, but my point here is that the Church really doesn't take the issue of loss of souls very seriously. If she did, there would be far more radical approaches to solving the crisis.

Actually on another note, there really isn't a vocations crisis, because whenever traditional options of the priesthood and religious life are available, candidates present themselves.
It is only a lack of vocations amongst the watered down NewChurch religion that has a vocations crisis.
I know 20 years ago when I was discerning a vocation in the NewChurch, i couldn't committ to the priestly life if i had to say the Novus Ordo. And there weren't any other options around where I lived. This was pre-internet too so I hadn't heard of what few traditional groups existed at that time.

The real crisis is in providing truly Catholic Priestly vocation opportunities, not in the number of candidates themselves.

God will give true priests to his Church, but the Church doesn't want true priests.
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#5
Concerning recruiting efforts, this is what Cardinal Piacenza said in his recent letter to seminarians:

This prayerful dimension of the priestly vocation reminds us of still more very important aspects. First among them is the fact that vocations grow not principally from a pastoral strategy, but above all through prayer. As Jesus taught: "Pray... the Lord of the harvest to send out labourers into his harvest" (Lk. 10:2). Commenting on these evangelical words, Pope Benedict XVI noted: "We cannot simply 'produce' vocations; they must come from God. This is not like other professions; we cannot simply recruit people by using the right kind of publicity or the correct type of strategy. The call which comes from the heart of God must always find its way into the heart of man" (Meeting with Priests and Deacons of Bavaria. 14 September 2006).

http://rorate-caeli.blogspot.com/2013/06...dinal.html
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#6
This article, while passionate in its plea, makes the point that nobody is crying over the dearth of vocations. Certainly people are taking note--even the author himself!--and I remember the bishop of my diocese preaching on this very subject at the Chrism Mass a few years ago. People see, they are concerned, and they are weeping. But there is also cause for celebration, for we all know that the ranks of Traditional orders are ever increasing in number, as young men of my generation seek authenticity, unadaulterated truth, and splendour.

Also regardless of what is thought about the Novus Ordo, as a Catholic in communion with Rome, I would hesitate to blame the Mass itself. A Mass is a Mass is a Mass. That being said, direct blame as it were can be blamed on the manner of celebrating the Liturgy: clown costumes to lady ministers. Couple that with the gravely inferior and downright stupid and empty catechesis my generation received (nay, were subjected to) in the 90s and you have a perfect storm.

Alas and woe on one hand, rejoicing on the other...
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#7
The Mass is not the Mass is the Mass, but a fabrication which only has validity due to the protection of God and licitness due to promulgation by the Pope. It is the Latin Mass which has more graces, especially a High Mass, catechesis is endemic and the prayer of it is going to be reflected in belief of it. The prayer of the Novus Ordo is deficient, stunted, and saccharine.

There is rarely a proper NO Mass celebrated, as intended, and if one reads the footnotes of "Ceremonies of the Modern Roman Rite" by Mgr Elliott, one sees he clearly differentiates between what is done and what the "old rubricians" (specifically in the portions relating to the Liturgy of the Eucharist) intended/ had in mind.

To say the Mass is the Mass is like saying, "Mary is awesome" is on par with the Ave Maria. For starters, it's an erroneous and dangerous application of the etymological meaning of awesome; second, it's stunted in its ability to actually teach about Mary's role. Similarly, the Novus Ordo Missae misuses concepts and flips things around, misapplies primacy of the meal aspect which is necessitated by the sacrificial aspect taking first place. The two can co-exist in a manner of speaking, but without the Sacrifice, you're just eating a very emaciated community meal. Without the Sacrifice, there is no meal.

The Novus Ordo has sought to place the meal over the Sacrifice and loses. The priest has become a facilitator and the lines are blurred. Laity are handling the Sacred Host like It's a mere piece of bread, but it's the Bread of Life: Christ!

There was no room for this nonsense in the TLM and it's all over the NO. So, while at some academic level the NO may be acceptable in the minimum standard, at the practical level of application it is absolutely dangerous to the Faith, vocations, etc.

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#8
jonbhorton, I appreciate your points and agree with most of them. I too am a devoteé of TLM and see the deficiences of the NO myself. When I said "the Mass is the Mass the Mass" I was referring to the substance, ie the fact that both the NO and EF lead to the same thing: Christ in the Eucharist. Beyond that, yes, the NO is inferior. But my view (and this is just personal opinion) is that I will attend an NO if there is no EF around to fulfill a Sunday obligation. Hope that clears up my point.
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#9
The only way this happens is if the intent is maintained. It is suspect that the intent of the priest, in the formation post-NO, is there. One seriously wonders about intent if the things surrounding that moment of the consecration are not Catholic in their theology.

If one believes in the Real Presence, as the Church believes, then how can they do the things they do? How can they not enforce Canon Law on the issue of who can receive Holy Communion? If they have a stunted understanding, or even a heretical view, do they actually consecrate the Host? Similarly, in Protestant Baptisms, if they don't have the intent, how can the Sacrament be actualized? Sacraments require Form, Matter and Intent.

One wonders if the Sacrament takes place if the intent is not there as intended.

An older priest I know, a Religious, told me once he remembered when priests were doing all sorts of things for the bread: donuts, pizza, etc. They didn't understand or believe the necessary things to validly consecrate the Host, so they just gave out pieces of donuts, pizza, etc. If one disbelieves in the necessity of matter, how can they believe in the necessary intent?

At least with the TLM, being smaller, this misunderstanding is backstopped.
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#10
(06-06-2013, 03:30 PM)jonbhorton Wrote: The only way this happens is if the intent is maintained. It is suspect that the intent of the priest, in the formation post-NO, is there. One seriously wonders about intent if the things surrounding that moment of the consecration are not Catholic in their theology.

If one believes in the Real Presence, as the Church believes, then how can they do the things they do? How can they not enforce Canon Law on the issue of who can receive Holy Communion? If they have a stunted understanding, or even a heretical view, do they actually consecrate the Host? Similarly, in Protestant Baptisms, if they don't have the intent, how can the Sacrament be actualized? Sacraments require Form, Matter and Intent.

One wonders if the Sacrament takes place if the intent is not there as intended.

An older priest I know, a Religious, told me once he remembered when priests were doing all sorts of things for the bread: donuts, pizza, etc. They didn't understand or believe the necessary things to validly consecrate the Host, so they just gave out pieces of donuts, pizza, etc. If one disbelieves in the necessity of matter, how can they believe in the necessary intent?

At least with the TLM, being smaller, this misunderstanding is backstopped.

This sounds like liturgical Donatism.

Though I understand what you are saying about the NO one can not draw the conclusion that because of the intent of the celebrant the Sacrament is made invalid or ineffective.
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