The Book of common prayers
#1
So earlier today as I was with my family at the swapmeet I came across a vendor selling used books. I came across a religious section that was selling different bibles and prayerbooks, and different religious books. Half of them were protestant and half were Catholic. They were both mixed up together. I was only looking for the Catholic related stuff. I had bought a Catholic bible, and another book. However I picked up a book called The Book of Common Prayers, which to me at the same time seemed pretty Catholic. I skimmed through it.

I had bought it because I needed a prayer book and I thought that this was Catholic. However it was only when I got home that I actually opened it up, and right in the first page it said " to be used for the Episcopalian community" I later learned from the internet that The Book of Common Prayers is what Anglicans use for worship.

My question is should I keep it? Or should I just throw it away? Or just give it to someone else?

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#2
I, personally would NOT destroy or throw it away, but keep it as there are some prayers that are Catholic.  You can also use it to learn about the Church of England and its offshoots and what is similar to and quite different from the Catholic Church.  It would be "Educational Material" which is something that may come in helpful if you find your self talking to someone from the Churches that use the Book of Common Prayer.
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#3
It probably has way better English than our breviary :{
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#4
(06-16-2013, 01:20 AM)Philosoraptor Wrote: It probably has way better English than our breviary :{

I noticed that. They use the King James I believe

Here is an excerpt

O Lord save thy people and bless thine heritage.
Govern them, and lift them up for ever.
Day by day we magnify thee;
And we worship thy Name ever, world without end.
Couchsafe, O Lord, to keep us this day without sin.
O Lord, let thy mercy be upon us, as our trust is in thee
o Lord, in thee have I trusted; let me never be confounded

Blessed art thou, O Lord God of our fathers; praised
and exalted above all for ever.
Blessed art thou for the Nme of thy Majesty; praised
and exalted above all for ever
Blessed art thou in the temple of thy holiness: praised
and exalted above all for ever.
Blessed art thou that beholdest the depths, and dwellest
between the Cherubim: praised and exalted above all for ever
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#5
The 'Book of Common Prayers'? Never heard of it, but if it is the 'Book of Common Prayer', I agree with Jerome. It might come in handy for apologetics. However, it might also be an 'Anglo-Catholic' prayer book. I know of two 'Anglo-Catholic' prayer books, the 'St Augustine's Prayer Book' and 'Anglo-Catholic Prayers for Church of England People' that are solidly orthodox. They are, in part, what brought me to the Church.
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#6
(06-16-2013, 02:56 AM)jovan66102 Wrote: The 'Book of Common Prayers'? Never heard of it, but if it is the 'Book of Common Prayer', I agree with Jerome. It might come in handy for apologetics. However, it might also be an 'Anglo-Catholic' prayer book. I know of two 'Anglo-Catholic' prayer books, the 'St Augustine's Prayer Book' and 'Anglo-Catholic Prayers for Church of England People' that are solidly orthodox. They are, in part, what brought me to the Church.

Yupl it was the book of common prayer

My bad
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#7
I like Jerome's advise.  But maybe I am a little biased since I am a convert from the Episcopal Church.  When I was a child we used the 1928 Book of Common Prayer and the 1940 Hymnal.  We left that Church due to being unhappy with how they wanted to replace those books.  I was one of the teenagers and our parents were hearing, "But we have to make the service more meaningful for our children."  Let me tell you.  I was one young person they drove away from the Church with their changes.
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#8
(06-16-2013, 12:39 PM)ArturoOrtiz Wrote:
(06-16-2013, 02:56 AM)jovan66102 Wrote: The 'Book of Common Prayers'? Never heard of it, but if it is the 'Book of Common Prayer', I agree with Jerome. It might come in handy for apologetics. However, it might also be an 'Anglo-Catholic' prayer book. I know of two 'Anglo-Catholic' prayer books, the 'St Augustine's Prayer Book' and 'Anglo-Catholic Prayers for Church of England People' that are solidly orthodox. They are, in part, what brought me to the Church.

Yupl it was the book of common prayer

My bad

What edition, out of curiosity? If it's 1928 or earlier take a look at the Psalter. It's from the Great Bible of 1538 which as I pointed out on another thread is, IMHO, the best English translation for reading. It was done under Henry VIII when his only difference with Rome was the Pope and is solidly Catholic.
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#9
(06-16-2013, 04:08 PM)OmniaInstaurareInChristo Wrote: I like Jerome's advise.  But maybe I am a little biased since I am a convert from the Episcopal Church.  When I was a child we used the 1928 Book of Common Prayer and the 1940 Hymnal.  We left that Church due to being unhappy with how they wanted to replace those books.  I was one of the teenagers and our parents were hearing, "But we have to make the service more meaningful for our children."  Let me tell you.  I was one young person they drove away from the Church with their changes.

I came from Anglicanism through Orthodoxy and I remember well the uproar with the replacement of the '28 Book! Remember the 'Green Book'? The 1928 is recognisably a development of the 1549 Book, but the new Book is like comparing the NO with the TLM.
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#10
(06-16-2013, 04:13 PM)jovan66102 Wrote:
(06-16-2013, 04:08 PM)OmniaInstaurareInChristo Wrote: I like Jerome's advise.  But maybe I am a little biased since I am a convert from the Episcopal Church.  When I was a child we used the 1928 Book of Common Prayer and the 1940 Hymnal.  We left that Church due to being unhappy with how they wanted to replace those books.  I was one of the teenagers and our parents were hearing, "But we have to make the service more meaningful for our children."  Let me tell you.  I was one young person they drove away from the Church with their changes.

I came from Anglicanism through Orthodoxy and I remember well the uproar with the replacement of the '28 Book! Remember the 'Green Book'? The 1928 is recognisably a development of the 1549 Book, but the new Book is like comparing the NO with the TLM.

Great point in your last sentence.  Hm.  Now that you mention it, it may have been the "Green Book" they were using when we decided to leave the Episcopal Church.
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