The Book of common prayers
#11
(06-16-2013, 04:10 PM)jovan66102 Wrote:
(06-16-2013, 12:39 PM)ArturoOrtiz Wrote:
(06-16-2013, 02:56 AM)jovan66102 Wrote: The 'Book of Common Prayers'? Never heard of it, but if it is the 'Book of Common Prayer', I agree with Jerome. It might come in handy for apologetics. However, it might also be an 'Anglo-Catholic' prayer book. I know of two 'Anglo-Catholic' prayer books, the 'St Augustine's Prayer Book' and 'Anglo-Catholic Prayers for Church of England People' that are solidly orthodox. They are, in part, what brought me to the Church.

Yupl it was the book of common prayer

My bad

What edition, out of curiosity? If it's 1928 or earlier take a look at the Psalter. It's from the Great Bible of 1538 which as I pointed out on another thread is, IMHO, the best English translation for reading. It was done under Henry VIII when his only difference with Rome was the Pope and is solidly Catholic.

Hmmm... I have a 1559 version, but it doesn't include a Psalter. It tells you which Psalms to use at which times, but doesn't actually include the texts. It just says to use Psalms from the Great Bible or the Bishop's Bible. I have a lot of Bibles, but neither of those.      >:(
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#12
(06-16-2013, 04:10 PM)jovan66102 Wrote:
(06-16-2013, 12:39 PM)ArturoOrtiz Wrote:
(06-16-2013, 02:56 AM)jovan66102 Wrote: The 'Book of Common Prayers'? Never heard of it, but if it is the 'Book of Common Prayer', I agree with Jerome. It might come in handy for apologetics. However, it might also be an 'Anglo-Catholic' prayer book. I know of two 'Anglo-Catholic' prayer books, the 'St Augustine's Prayer Book' and 'Anglo-Catholic Prayers for Church of England People' that are solidly orthodox. They are, in part, what brought me to the Church.

Yupl it was the book of common prayer

My bad

What edition, out of curiosity? If it's 1928 or earlier take a look at the Psalter. It's from the Great Bible of 1538 which as I pointed out on another thread is, IMHO, the best English translation for reading. It was done under Henry VIII when his only difference with Rome was the Pope and is solidly Catholic.

The date says 1952 but above that it says " I certify that this edition of the Book of Common prayer conforms to the Standard Book of 1928, as amended by subsequent actions of General Convention

I just saw that their is some writing inside the book. There are two or three cards with inscriptions on them. At the first page their is signature that says A Donald Davies.

I just saw this from  Wikipedia

about Archibald Donald Davies who was the fourth Episcopal bishop of Dallas
It says that he was the founder of the  Evangelical and Catholic Mission easily.

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#13
(06-16-2013, 11:08 PM)ArturoOrtiz Wrote: The date says 1952 but above that it says " I certify that this edition of the Book of Common prayer conforms to the Standard Book of 1928, as amended by subsequent actions of General Convention

I just saw that their is some writing inside the book. There are two or three cards with inscriptions on them. At the first page their is signature that says A Donald Davies.

I just saw this from  Wikipedia

about Archibald Donald Davies who was the fourth Episcopal bishop of Dallas
It says that he was the founder of the  Evangelical and Catholic Mission easily.

It's a '28 Book. Hang on to it! It might be valuable some day. The (Episcopal) Diocese of Dallas is poised to leave the Anglicans and there is hope that many of them might swim the Tiber!

Wikipedia Wrote:The Dioceses of Dallas along with the Diocese of Western Louisiana are opposed to the ordination of gay clergy but have chosen to stay within the Protestant Episcopal Church. The Diocese of Dallas approved, at its 2006 Diocesan Convention, an amendment to the Diocesan constitution that it would break with the Episcopal Church only if that body were no longer part of the worldwide Anglican Communion. A vast majority of the Diocese of Fort Worth, on the other hand, voted to break away from the Episcopal Church in 2008. Additionally, several conservative parishes, including ChristChurch/Plano, purchased their properties from the Diocese of Dallas and are now aligned with Anglican bodies other than the Episcopal Church.
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#14
(06-15-2013, 10:38 PM)ArturoOrtiz Wrote: So earlier today as I was with my family at the swapmeet I came across a vendor selling used books. I came across a religious section that was selling different bibles and prayerbooks, and different religious books. Half of them were protestant and half were Catholic. They were both mixed up together. I was only looking for the Catholic related stuff. I had bought a Catholic bible, and another book. However I picked up a book called The Book of Common Prayers, which to me at the same time seemed pretty Catholic. I skimmed through it.

I had bought it because I needed a prayer book and I thought that this was Catholic. However it was only when I got home that I actually opened it up, and right in the first page it said " to be used for the Episcopalian community" I later learned from the internet that The Book of Common Prayers is what Anglicans use for worship.

My question is should I keep it? Or should I just throw it away? Or just give it to someone else?

The Anglican Book of Common Prayer contains outright heresy. It's either in the first section or the last, but it says that belief in a sacrificial priesthood (celibacy) and The Real Presence of the Holy Eucharist are to be considered "pope-ish superstitions." Throw that book in the trash and invest in a better one that has all the prayers you need to know, plus the history of the one true church, its beliefs, and an explication of the mass. The1962 Roman Missal (Angelus press):  http://angeluspress.org/image/cache/data...00x800.jpg

Take a quick listen to this video about the Anglican Book at 49:00.  
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#15
I've got the Book of Common Prayer, a very old one. It was in our parish library because someone had donated it and Father told me I could take it home. Wow I love it, and the illuminated fonts and medieval artwork are to die for!

I also love the King James Bible. I've got a super large print, words of Christ in red. It blows every other version out of the water, in my humble opinion. I also have the Revised Standard Version - not the Catholic edition. It does include the extra books of the OT but they are separated from the rest of the Bible and clustered in the back. I just think the Protestant Bible is more beautiful and the Anglican prayers are beautiful too.

Sorry.
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#16
'Tis probably my lingering Protestantism, but I can't stop being fond of the KJV myself, SCG. That tradition from the KJV through the ESV has produced some lovely translations - in particular the old NAS, which my mom had us memorize as kids. I've got a 1611 edition of the KJV and it's awesome! If it hadn't set the Deuterocanonicals in a blasted Appendix it would've been perfect  :censored:
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#17
(06-25-2013, 01:33 PM)Philosoraptor Wrote: 'Tis probably my lingering Protestantism, but I can't stop being fond of the KJV myself, SCG. That tradition from the KJV through the ESV has produced some lovely translations - in particular the old NAS, which my mom had us memorize as kids. I've got a 1611 edition of the KJV and it's awesome! If it hadn't set the Deuterocanonicals in a blasted Appendix it would've been perfect  :censored:

I'm a cradle Catholic, but I've always loved the KJV. Mine does not have any commentaries or footnotes, but I don't need it for my personal use. I'm sure there are better Bibles for study, and maybe even for devotional reading. But nothing beats the King James when it comes to memorization and recitation. It's the only Bible that I actually read out loud alone in my room. Once you get used to it, it's not cumbersome to the tongue. Compare KJV psalms, and Matthew's Sermon on the Mount with other versions. And why take ye thought for raiment? Consider the lilies of the field, how they grow; they toil not, neither do they spin:

Simply beautiful!
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#18
(06-25-2013, 01:33 PM)Philosoraptor Wrote: 'Tis probably my lingering Protestantism, but I can't stop being fond of the KJV myself, SCG. That tradition from the KJV through the ESV has produced some lovely translations - in particular the old NAS, which my mom had us memorize as kids. I've got a 1611 edition of the KJV and it's awesome! If it hadn't set the Deuterocanonicals in a blasted Appendix it would've been perfect  :censored:

I am a Cradle Catholic as well but I have to give merit to the King James beauty that is contained in it. Is there a place to buy one with the deuterocanonical books online?
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#19
Like it or not, the KJV is a cornerstone of modern English and an irreplaceable influence in our culture.
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#20
The BCP does contain some heresy, but it's easy to ignore it. I wouldn't rip it out, because, it is probably going to be a valuable book some day. With that said, the Book of Common Prayer does in fact have many good Catholic prayers, as was already said.

If you do want a more Catholic, official one, the Book of Divine Worship is what many Anglican Use parishes use.
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