Kick Your Sugar Addiction in 9 Simple Steps
#1
I was gonna post this under the Sugar Babies thread, but I thought more may see it here. It is good info and although I think he pussyfooted around the artificial sweetener debacle, the article has some very sound advise about a potential poison: Refined Sugar.

Keyboard Warrior


http://refreshingnews99.blogspot.in/2013...imple.html

June 21, 2013

Kick Your Sugar Addiction in 9 Simple Steps

No matter how health conscious you are, you're bound to crave sweet things from time to time. But overloading on sugar can lead to lots of unwanted pounds and a wide range of health problems, including heart disease, diabetes, and high blood pressure.

In addition to sending your energy levels on a roller coaster ride, overdosing on sugar sends your hunger hormones into overdrive. The satiety hormones that tell your brain "I'm full!" aren't properly triggered, which means you end up eating more than you need to. Not only that, but sugar triggers a rush of endorphins, the feel-good hormone. Nice as it feels in the short term, if you overdo the sugar too often, you're likely to develop a craving for that sugar rush, which will lead to more extra calories, and more disappointment when you step on the scale.

So it's no wonder that experts recommend limiting sugar intake. If you're a woman, limit your intake of added sugars to 25 grams per day. (That's about 100 calories, or 6 teaspoons.) Most men should limit added sugars to 38 grams per day, which is about 150 calories per day, or about 9 teaspoons.

Here's how you can shake the sugar habit:

Step 1: Know where to find it. You can find sugar by checking the ingredient list printed below the Nutrition Facts panel on most packaged foods. Added sugar goes by many names and often ends in "ose," such as lactose or maltose or sucrose. Other names for sugar include:

• brown sugar
• cane sugar
• corn syrup
• corn sugar
• dextrose
• fruit juice concentrate
• high fructose corn syrup
• honey
• maltodextrin
• molasses sucrose
• raw sugar
• turbinado sugar

Step 2: Scan the ingredients. If sugar (or a sugar from the list above) is one of the first three ingredients, think twice before choosing this food. Ingredients are listed by weight, so the ingredients that are listed first make up a greater percentage of the product.


Step 3: Add it up. To determine if a food has added sugars (and how much), you have to do a little math. First, look at the Nutrition Facts panel and the line for total sugars. There are four calories in each gram of sugar, so if a product has 20 grams of sugar per serving, that's 80 calories just from the sugar alone. How do you know if any of that is "added sugar"? Look at the ingredient list and see whether it contains any added sugars (like those from the list above). If it does not, the food doesn't contain any added sugars. The sugars that come from a natural sugar like lactose (milk sugar) or fructose (fruit sugar) are often considered "healthier" simply because they come from a food that offers other nutritional benefits like calcium and vitamin D (in milk) or fiber and vitamin C (in fresh fruit). But if you see an added sugar among the first three ingredients, the product contains significant "added sugars," and it's best to avoid it.

Step 4: Aim low. Choose products with the least amount of added sugar. On any product, aim for no more than 2.5 grams of added sugar per 100 calories.

Step 5: Go natural. Choose fresh fruit to satisfy a sweet craving; it provides vitamins, minerals, and fiber in addition to some hydration, so it will keep you feeling fuller longer.

Step 6: Time it right. If you absolutely need a sweet, have it in the 20 to 30 minutes after a hard workout. During that time, your body is hyper-efficient at digesting the sugar. Pair the sweet with protein, and this will kick-start muscle repair.


Step 7: Choose an alternative. If you're looking to add flavor to your food, reach for herbs and spices instead of sugar. Cinnamon and cloves add flavor to oatmeal, while oregano and rosemary add flavor to marinara sauce.

Step 8: Know where it's hidden. Foods like salad dressings and yogurt may not taste sweet, but sugar is often added to low-fat versions of products to make them tastier. Even foods like multigrain bread contain about 2 grams of added sugar per slice. Look for brands that have the label "no added sugar."

Step 9: Watch the substitutes. With all these dire warnings about sugar, it's tempting to reach for calorie-free artificial sweeteners. Low-calorie sweeteners have led to the creation of a wide range of low-calorie products, which offer a healthier alternative for anyone watching their weight and those with diabetes, who must carefully monitor their carbohydrate and sugar intakes. Low-calorie sweeteners have been the subject of extensive scientific research and are generally recognized as safe by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). While the research suggests that artificial sweeteners won't make you eat more, many people report sugar cravings and a need for more food after consuming "diet" foods sweetened with sugar substitutes. In addition, many report that once they cut back on the artificial sweeteners, their cravings ebbed, and it was easier to resist sweet temptations and lose weight.
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#2
I can quit anytime I want!
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#3
(06-21-2013, 12:06 PM)cgraye Wrote: I can quit anytime I want!

I don't know how old you are, but if your lookin' at your 50's, it may become an issue that you will HAVE TO address at some point...and not having diabetes in your family doesn't count. There is no genetic link to Type 2. It can happen to anyone!
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#4
Anything with natural sugar, but no added sugar or sweetener, is generally fine.  The problem with honey these days is that it has added sugar to compete with foods that have added sugar.
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#5
(06-21-2013, 12:48 PM)Zedta Wrote:
(06-21-2013, 12:06 PM)cgraye Wrote: I can quit anytime I want!

I don't know how old you are, but if your lookin' at your 50's, it may become an issue that you will HAVE TO address at some point...and not having diabetes in your family doesn't count. There is no genetic link to Type 2. It can happen to anyone!

Not yet. There are families where many have type 2 diabetes, just as there are families where no one has type 2 diabetes, regardless of diet. So yes, there is a genetic basis, just no specific gene or group of genes found yet. (See Pima indians)
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#6
(06-23-2013, 03:32 PM)DiesIrae Wrote:
(06-21-2013, 12:48 PM)Zedta Wrote:
(06-21-2013, 12:06 PM)cgraye Wrote: I can quit anytime I want!

I don't know how old you are, but if your lookin' at your 50's, it may become an issue that you will HAVE TO address at some point...and not having diabetes in your family doesn't count. There is no genetic link to Type 2. It can happen to anyone!

Not yet. There are families where many have type 2 diabetes, just as there are families where no one has type 2 diabetes, regardless of diet. So yes, there is a genetic basis, just no specific gene or group of genes found yet. (See Pima indians)

One thing about comparing families, is that family members tend to eat the same foods and have very similar dietary habits and these factors are often overlooked.


I worked with the Navajo on the Res Hospital. I know about Type II. Many studies have been done where there  does seem to be a genetic link, however, they often ignore certain givens. When, for instance, you study a group, often they have certain eating habits in common. In the case of the Native Americans, the Dine, specifically, when they come off their 'native diet' and eat 'white man's' food, they very commonly become 'insulin resistant', which is the heart of type II. Alcohol is an accellerant and speeds up the effects of diseases too.

Now, there was a study done, I don't know if you're referring to it, but the study revolved around a group of natives living in North Mexico, that did not come in contact with 'civilization' until the 20th century. Initial reports were of the group's great state of health, living off the land and what crops they could grow, mostly maize and meat. After a few years, an entrepreneur set up a general store near the group and they all began to eat modern processed foods. Within a generation, they increasingly became sick and many of diabetes type II.

My son is a Pharmacist and worked at the Res Hospital too and he had to interview every patient that got a medication filled at the pharmacy and they would discuss the meds, diet, life style, etc. He said that invariably, he would hear the same response to his cautions about diet and that was; "I can't stop eating my fry bread!" (Vegetable oil, white flour, margarine (any) and sugar or honey...a trans fat train wreck!)

So, here's my point. Diabetes Type II is acquired. The dietary links are much stronger than the genetic, by one big factor; there is a big chance you can beat it by changing your diet and loosing weight.

As for Type I a strong genetic link, but, also, there is a strong link to infant aged onset and a hormone used in diary cows to induce milk production. The link was made because the onset of Juvenal Diabetes come soon after children are weened from formula or breast milk and begin drinking cow's milk. The hormone (enzyme) attacks the pancreas and especially the insulin producing cells of the pancreas. I don't believe it's reversible.

Finally, I found out about the time I worked at Shiprock, that I had Type II. I can tell you, that eating butter and never margarine, never soybean oil and NEVER Canola oil, eating very. very little bleached flour or processed wheat products ( I do eat Ezekiel bread, no flour...sprouts), very little eating out and virtually never at most corporate 'fast food joints',  no or very rare contact with any form of sugar, especially refined sugars, eating 5 grs of Omega 3's daily and losing about 50 lbs., has rewarded me with coming off my daily insulin shots and soon the Metformin too.

Trans fats are the main players in this battle. They coat the red cells and make it harder for insulin to pass into the cell and the body can't increase the insulin enough to force the stuff through...insulin tolerance. The 'refined' stuff just causes inflammatory tendencies to exacerbate and worsens the effects of the trans fats.  It takes time, but you can reduce or even eliminate trans fats from your cells, by eliminating it and other irritants from your diet. It has worked for me...triglycerides down and good Cholesterol up...yup, big difference!
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#7
What's wrong with canola oil, out of curiosity?  Huh?
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#8
(06-26-2013, 08:23 PM)Zedta Wrote: So, here's my point. Diabetes Type II is acquired. The dietary links are much stronger than the genetic, by one big factor; there is a big chance you can beat it by changing your diet and loosing weight. 

I know you wrote more, but I am just addressing this point. Just because a health problem can be fixed by diet and exercise doesn't mean there is no strong genetic component. For example, the inherited metabolic disorders are linked to certain genes. I am only using galactosemia as an example, but the treatment is to avoid galactose - so a dietary measure for a genetic problem.
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#9
(06-28-2013, 12:55 PM)DiesIrae Wrote:
(06-26-2013, 08:23 PM)Zedta Wrote: So, here's my point. Diabetes Type II is acquired. The dietary links are much stronger than the genetic, by one big factor; there is a big chance you can beat it by changing your diet and loosing weight. 

I know you wrote more, but I am just addressing this point. Just because a health problem can be fixed by diet and exercise doesn't mean there is no strong genetic component. For example, the inherited metabolic disorders are linked to certain genes. I am only using galactosemia as an example, but the treatment is to avoid galactose - so a dietary measure for a genetic problem.

Oh, I certainly agree there can be a genetic propensity for a disease and by avoiding certain substances, one can avoid their effects. For instance, if you (sadly) suffer from galactosemia, you can avoid the serious side effects of the disease from not being able to digest galactose since you don't produce the enzyme needed to produce to process. But if you have Duarte form, you need not restrict your diet at all and there are additional (Types 1-3) forms of the disease as well which further support the genetic causes.

However, in diabetes, one sees only two types and one is clearly genetic (Type I) and even it is questionable since some cases are caused by an hormone added to cow's milk, whilst others are seen at near birth, but both are treated similarly with supplemental insulin and dietary changes. Further, in the case of Type II, insulin production is not the issue, since the body does produce the often correct levels of the hormone, but the cells cannot absorb it inside to make the glucose. There is no genetic preponderance here, since this is an acquired state. The state of the body may be poised to display all the traits of diabetes, but if the person doesn't eat the 'white man's diet', they probably won't get the symptoms. Type I's don't have that luxury and remain on insulin lifelong. Those with type II can beat the disease by not eating 'foods' that are prone to encourage the disease to show up in the first place.

So, in the case you cited, galactosemia is, yes, decidedly genetic and unavoidable. Galactosemia follows an autosomal recessive mode of inheritance that confers a deficiency in an enzyme responsible for adequate galactose degradation. Diet and some medications may assist in living a normal life and avoiding the side effects of the disease like speech difficulties, et al. But you have a genetic lack of a certain enzyme (hormone) in this disease, as you do with Type I diabetes. However, with some forms of diabetes Type I and with Type II, there is no propensity for the symptoms of the disease, unless the environment introduces substances into the body which cause symptoms like the genetic forms exhibit, except for the lack  or markedly lowered levels of the enzyme (hormone) insulin. Also, these acquired forms of diabetes do not show up at birth, but after a time and after exposure to modern foods and processes.
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#10
(06-27-2013, 06:55 AM)Joshua Wrote: What's wrong with canola oil, out of curiosity?  Huh?

Without going into too much detail, do you really want to use a failed, synthetic crankcase oil to cook your foods in?
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