Sunday worship for "Humanists"
#11
(06-23-2013, 02:34 PM)loggats Wrote: Have you read Benson's 'Lord of the World'? It addresses this kind of dystopian attitude in humanism.

This is exactly what I was thinking. You beat me to the punch. Everyone should read that book. It's exactly what is happening right now. Well, that is, besides the telegraphs and whatnot.
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#12
(06-23-2013, 02:18 PM)The Tax Collector Wrote: First post, although I have been reading posts regularly for over a year.  I just read this on CNN mobile.  I suppose a godless Sunday congregation was inevitable.... The Wedding Mass became the exchanging of vows, the funeral mass became a celebration of life, and the baptism the baby naming ceremony. The unfortunate thing is, I know so many who will embrace this, it will give their Sunday's purpose, because compassion for our fellow humans and social justice issues do so much for the soul!  
Lord have Mercy!

I hate to break it to you, but if you think compassion for your fellow man doesn't do anything for your soul, that it's just some touchy-feely modernist crap, you're already in the wrong religion.
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#13
Ho hum, what else is new? The Unitarian Universalist church has been doing weekend secular community-based worship for a century at least. They don't consider themselves a structured religion, and they don't follow the 10 commandments. They just borrow good ideas from every philosophy known to man (not necessarily in this order): Carl Jung, Greek, Buddha, Wiccan, Jesus, Mohammed, Luther, The Enlightenment, Descartes, Rousseau, Sigmund Freud, Galileo, etc. Throw it all into a pot, stir, bake, and out comes UU. Anything you believe in is fine with them. What's new and shocking is that our Catholic church is adopting this secular humanistic approach among our clerical leaders.
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#14
(06-24-2013, 06:49 PM)Melkite Wrote:
(06-23-2013, 02:18 PM)The Tax Collector Wrote: First post, although I have been reading posts regularly for over a year.  I just read this on CNN mobile.  I suppose a godless Sunday congregation was inevitable.... The Wedding Mass became the exchanging of vows, the funeral mass became a celebration of life, and the baptism the baby naming ceremony. The unfortunate thing is, I know so many who will embrace this, it will give their Sunday's purpose, because compassion for our fellow humans and social justice issues do so much for the soul!  
Lord have Mercy!

I hate to break it to you, but if you think compassion for your fellow man doesn't do anything for your soul, that it's just some touchy-feely modernist crap, you're already in the wrong religion.
You missed the bus partner, but reading comprehension is not everyone's cup of tea. The issue is NOT that compassion for your fellow man is misplaced; it is the substitution god with a humanist ideology, wrapped up in nice ideals like "compassion for your fellow man", which is an easy concept for the non practicing religious to support.
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#15
Greg Epstein, huh? He came and spoke last year at a school I used to attend. Apparently he's kicking this good humanist thing into high gear. Telling, though, that he knowingly and deliberately shanghais religious terms and methods of interaction for his agenda. I have an opinion, but I think Bill Vallicella over at maverickphilosopher tells it better:



But I would urge these atheists to go further and practice doxastic abstinence.  Without rejecting your atheist beliefs, put them within brackets for the Lenten period.  Practice epoché with respect to them, that is, withhold intellectual assent.  That is not to doubt them or disbelieve them, but simply to make no use of them.  Leave them alone for a time.  In the strict sense epoché goes beyond even suspension of judgment.  If I suspend judgment with respect to a propositional content, I neither affirm it, deny it, doubt it, nor even just entertain it.  For if I do any of those things I admit that it has a coherent sense.  In epoché, however, I leave it open whether the content has a coherent sense.  Epoché is the ultimate in doxastic disengagement.  Practicing total doxastic abstinence, I totally disengage from those propositions that ignite often acrimonious disagreement.

You can always go back to your atheist beliefs.  Another excellent form of self-denial for atheists and religionists alike is to abstain from all theological controversies and polemics from time to time.  One could call it a 'belief fast.'  I hope we can all agree that being just is better than developing a theory of justice.  And if discussing the Trinity only makes you angry and combative, then it might be best to drop theology and cultivate piety.

But while atheists can profit from voluntary self-denial, bringing such practices under the Lent umbrella makes little sense.  Will the period of self-denial go from Ash Wednesday to Easter Sunday?  Why tie it to these dates freighted as they are with Christian metaphysics?  When a Christian reminds himself on Ash Wednesday that he is dust and shall return to dust, the whole point of that memento mori is situated within the context of the hope for and promise of eternal life.  Christian mortalism is toto caelo different from atheist mortalism.  And what the Christian celebrates on Easter Sunday is precisely the bodily resurrection of Jesus Christ by the power of God  and the hope that death will be conquered eventually for all. No atheist believes that.

In the final analysis, Lent secularized is no longer Lent.  Atheists ought to exercise their imaginations and come up with a secular analog free of Chistian trappings.

Atheists ought also to worry that if they take up Christian practices, the beliefs may follow . . . . >  ~ http://maverickphilosopher.typepad.com/m...eists.html
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#16
Catholic tradition teaches that anything atheists do, whether it is alms giving, fasting or offering themselves up to be burnt, profits them nothing in the next life since they didn't do it for God.
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