Curious about joining an SSPX Monastery
#11
Drew:
 
You've been given some good advice above, especially with respect to making a 5 day Ignatian retreat if you can. A monastic vocation is serious business. I think the life of a monk is a lot more austere than many imagine, especially when you haven't had a Traditional upbringing. It may just be that you'll have to wait a while until you're more on your own before you can even begin to think about testing a vocation. In all honesty, having a Novus Ordo (unsupportive) family might be an obstacle. Take the next couple of years to pray, discern, and read/study (and get to a retreat, if at all possible). If God wants you to be a monk, he'll lead you to the monastery, one way or another.   
 
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#12
Drew,
 
Do yourself a favor and log on http://cloisters.tripod.com
This is a wonderful resource
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#13
http://www.sspxasia.com/Documents/Societ...ations.htm
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#14
Wow, great links!  Thank you!
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#15
drewmeister2 Wrote:Thanks for the reply, but I can't go to SSPX Chapels regularly.  My mom wouldnt let me.  And yes, she can take my car away so I can't drive there if I try to sneak it.  Its not worth it.  Believe me. 
 
And Im only 16, its not like Im 18, and am still under her "control". 
 
Thanks again! :)

 
I feel sorry for you, Drew. I'm 17 and fortunate enough to have a mom willing to drive to Mass on Sundays to the hotel. Too bad she is the only one that comes with me to Mass, for everyone else doesn't even go to ANY Mass period, especially my dad (who DOESN'T believe unnecessary servile work on Sunday is sinful). Now my sister and her family go to the Novus Ordo once in a while (like Christmas, Easter, or just when they plain feel like it). At least my mom comes and lets me have a ride from someone who attends the TLM when she can't make it.
 
I suggest Drew that you pray to St. Joseph to at least convince them to go to the TLM, and that through the True Mass they will be converted.
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#16
Hi Drew,
 
Getting the first step right when approaching your adult life and vocation is of paramount importance. I wholeheartedly agree with Matt re: your need to show due honor to your parents as you begin to discern God's perfect will for you. If you're aware of the crisis (and its meaning) that has afflicted the One True Church for the last half-century+, you'll long for Our Dear Lord to do the choosing for you. Be thankful for your "Nazareth", though seemingly contradictory... pray the Rosary daily, find a pre-60's Roman Missal, and pray the Mass daily as well. Your parents will be taking notice... and we will undergird you with our prayers, for what that is worth.
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#17
Dear Drewmeister,
 
I am 19. I have had the same problems like you have.
 
Maybe even a bit worse.

You should be obedient to your parents, but to a certain extent.
 
After you are 18, your parents will have to let you make your own decisions.
 
I do agree with the posts above about seriously checking and following some retreats before applying.
 
The SSPX and Indult traditionalist monasteries have a lot of potential applicants, unlike the delapidated Novus Ordo monasteries, but that also means they are selecting. They do not accept applicants younger than 18 years I think, because unlike older diocesan seminaries etc. they can't offer a universitary, academic, or college education degree like the pre 1965 small and grand seminaries could.
 
You've got to have a diploma of college or high school normally if you're 18.
 
The life of a monk is hard. It is not like being a seminarian in a brown habit instead of the black cassock. It's a lot more.

But it is great you feel you might have a vocation. You can always contact the SSPX superiors, the district and the monasteries for advice and guidance. They are happy to provide.
 
Some at the forum might be a bit harsh and reprimanding towards you, but that's because they want to prevent you from entering something you don't want in the end. To prevent sadness afterwards with the Benedictines and yourself.
 
And you should research other possibilities too, like the traditional Carmelites, DOminicans etc. Or a secular traditional priestly vocation if you've got the diploms.
 
I would not advise you to enter a non-traditional seminary or monastery. No matter how "conservative" they may seem. But you're clever enough to know that and test them.
 
Soli Deo gloria,
 
HMiS. 
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#18
Thank you all!
Great advice.
 
I dont know, I dont want to throw FSSP out the window (even though some SSPX dont like them, but oh well, I need to go where I am called).
 
Also, I have been considering over the past month Eastern Catholicism.  Im starting to fall more and more in love with the Eastern spirituality.  Maybe that is where God wants me?  I dont know.
 
Thanks again!
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#19
Quote:Also, I have been considering over the past month Eastern Catholicism.  Im starting to fall more and more in love with the Eastern spirituality.  Maybe that is where God wants me?  I dont know.
 
Dear Drewmeister,
 
I hope you are not only considering aesthetic aspects of spirituality as important. They are not the prime factor.
 
Eastern Catholicism is great, but I think it should be reserved to those from the original Rite areas.
 
Your rite, considering your German name, is the Roman Rite, the Latin Rite at least.
 
I know the mystical environment and prayers of the Eastern Rites might attract, but they are the same in essential as the Roman Rite, which is not as "emotional" as the Eastern Rite. The Roman Rite is very sober, straight, just, plain, but its simplicity makes it great. It gives the Western European mentality: Romanic and Germanic countries both included.
 
You don't have to "throw out" the FSSP, but just consider what you would be able to do in good conscience. Would you once a year approve Communion in the hand and the New Mass, while the rest of the year you're acting against it? That's what many Indult sites have to do, although many of their monasteries do not fortunately.
 
I think you should take your time to discern your vocation. Considering you are going from Benedictine to Eastern Rite from SSPX to FSSP to Indult and from Neo conservative to traditionalist, it is important for you to first get stability in your thoughts and opinions and explore what is your position in traditional Roman Catholicism, and whether you would e.g. want to enter the traditional SSPX-affiliated Redemptorists in England and Scotland (they own an island: Papa Stronsay)... (www.redemptorists.org.uk) They have eastern rite monks and priests along side traditional ROman Rite ones, both traditional ROman Catholic of course, just other rites (traditional Maronite, traditional Russian, Ruthenian, Byzantine Greek, Syriac). (They have Russian Rite nuns and Basilian sisters in the Ukraine too.) They are less harsh and strict than the traditional OSB rules.
 
More open and missionizing in parishes etc. etc.
 
A friend of mine who is a lawyer went there for a retreat in Scotland. He told me he could attend the Divine Liturgy there and the Roman Rite. They have two little chapels for both. That's the SSPX family of Roman Catholic Tradition. Not blindly staring upon the very important and universal Roman Rite (Tridentine), but also keeping other traditions of the apostolic foundations. This friend of mine however did prefer the Roman Rite because of its clarity and because it fits more into the western european mind. I must say, I do prefer the Traditional Latin Mass above the Divine Liturgies etc. I am not an emotional man and am constantly rationalizing dogma of the faith etc., not being "carried away" by chant or something into emotional feelings. Not at all.
 
You can contact those English and Scottish traditionalist redemptorists (C.ss.R.) See their site above and read their English magazine: www.thecatholic.org
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#20
Quote:They have eastern rite monks and priests along side traditional ROman Rite ones, both traditional ROman Catholic of course, just other rites (traditional Maronite, traditional Russian, Ruthenian, Byzantine Greek, Syriac). (They have Russian Rite nuns and Basilian sisters in the Ukraine too.) They are less harsh and strict than the traditional OSB rules.

It's interesting that you should mention this. I have had the privilege to have been in contact with an Eastern-rite brother from this monastery, and he told me that, and I quote:

"Its an
interesting question. Luckily in our monastery we have the privilege of
working in both Rites and so it is not a problem. The Order takes you under
its wing and the Society bishops give a dispensation."

So yes, you're quite right about the open, dual-rite nature of the Transalpine Redemptorists. If I decide on a clerical vocation, these men will definitely be at the top of my list, as I want to do what I can to help save Russia, but am (nominally, but I know not at heart) a Latin-rite Catholic. Interestingly, the monk with whom I have been in contact told me that the Redemptorists are even able to offer the pre-Nikonian (Old Believer) liturgy if they need to.

And drewmeister2, it is well worth contacting these holy monks. They take a while to respond, because of their isolation and also, I suppose, the fact that the monastic life leaves little time for the use of the internet, but I've found this dedicated religious' email letters very informative and of great value for spiritual guidance. Don't hesitate.

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